Programs

From an early age, Margaret Fuller dazzled New England's intelligent elite. Her famous Conversations changed women's sense of how they could think and live; her editorship of the Dial shaped American Romanticism. Megan Marshall tells the story of how Fuller, tired of Boston, accepted Horace Greeley's offer to be the New York Tribune's front-page columnist. The move unleashed a crusading concern for the urban poor and the plight of prostitutes, and a hunger for passionate experience. 

The banjo is emblematic of American country music. It is at the core of other important musical movements, including jazz and ragtime, and played an important part in the development of many genres, such as folk, bluegrass, and rock.  The instrument has been adopted by many cultures and has been ingrained into many musical traditions, from Mento music in the Caribbean to dance music in Ireland.

In his book, “Black Flags: The Rise of ISIS” (now out in paperback), Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Joby Warrick traces how the strain of militant Islam behind ISIS first arose in a remote Jordanian prison and spread with the unwitting aid of two American presidents. Drawing on high-level access to CIA and Jordanian sources, Warrick weaves moment-by-moment operational details with the perspectives of diplomats and spies, generals and heads of state, many of whom foresaw a menace worse than al Qaeda and tried desperately to stop it.

propublica.org

  Tuesday on Access Utah we’ll spend the hour with multiple Pulitzer winning reporter Ken Armstrong, who, with T. Christian Miller (of ProPublica), won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting for “a startling examination and expose of law enforcement's enduring failures to investigate reports of rape properly and to comprehend the traumatic effects on its victims.” Tuesday’s episode is part of the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative.

 

 

 

Viking Books

Julie Berry was inspired to write her new historical novel, “The Passion of Dolssa,” while listening to a college lecture she found online about medieval France. Fascinated, Berry began a two-year dive into research on the era, learning about the lives of several medieval female mystics like Clare of Assisi, Marguerite Porete, and Catherine of Siena, women who rejected marriage, almost unheard of at the time, and bucked the authority of the church with their own religious visions. “The Passion of Dolssa” is set during the 13th Century in southern France (the area now known as Provence), in the aftermath of the Albigensian Crusade.


hatch.senate.gov

  

  Seven-term Utah Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch considers a run for re-election. Energy developers plan to drill oil wells near the Bears Ears area. Utah's LGBTQ community comes together in response to Donald Trump's election. And the state completes an audit of the University of Utah's athletics program, including an investigation into the buyout of the men's basketball team series with Brigham Young University.

 

America’s Caveat River on Wild About Utah

Nov 17, 2016
waterrights.utah.gov

I grew up in a town that had a story for nearly every run-down property in its borders. Most buildings had at least one ghost floating around its fence line, but the really haunted estate—the one where, supposedly, my great-great uncle plastered babies into the walls, where it’s said he threw his wife into the well, where the land itself swallows livestock and spits out bones, where you can still hear screams coiling up near the hackthorn bushes and willow trees—is just outside of town. Just far enough to escape the reach of the city lights, but not too far that you won’t make it back by morning. The location, more than its history, is probably the reason for the stories. If there is no journey, there is no room for stories to germinate.

"Oceans are a sonic symphony. Sound is essential to the survival and prosperity of marine life. But man-made ocean noise is threatening this fragile world.” So say the producers of a documentary film, “Sonic Sea,” which takes us beneath the ocean’s surface to uncover the consequences of increased ocean noise pollution, including the mass stranding of whales around the planet, and looks at what can be done to stop it.

 

Aimee Cobabe

Elite Hall in Hyrum, Utah has a rare dance floor with a lot of character under its surface.

It’s one of only two left in Utah with a spring floor. What is a spring floor? Well, it literally gives a dance floor spring.

On Wednesday’s Access Utah we’ll talk with acclaimed law professor and historian, Annette Gordon-Reed, as a part of the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative.

Objectified: Uncovering The Sex Trafficking Industry In America

Nov 15, 2016
Robin Jones

 

The movie is called The Abolitionists, and Robin Jones was invited to watch it at the home of a friend. It was shocking, eye-opening, compelling. A 2016 production of Fletchet Entertainment, the film highlights the efforts of Operation Underground Railroad - abbreviated OUR - to rescue children from sex-trafficking, and it opened Robin’s eyes to a problem she immediately knew she had to help solve.

The University of North Carolina Press

In the mid-1840s, Warner McCary, an ex-slave from Mississippi, claimed a new identity for himself, traveling around the nation as Choctaw performer "Okah Tubbee". He soon married Lucy Stanton, a divorced white Mormon woman from New York, who likewise claimed to be an Indian and used the name "Laah Ceil". Together, they embarked on an astounding, sometimes scandalous journey across the United States and Canada, performing as American Indians

 

npr.org

  Jessica Lahey’s The Gift of Failure focuses on the critical school years when parents must learn to allow their children to experience the disappointment and frustration that occur from life’s inevitable problems so that they can grow up to be successful, resilient, and self-reliant adults.

 

 

Utahns react to Donald Trump's election as president. Utah Republican Sen. Mike Lee votes for Evan McMullin in protest of Donald Trump. LDS Church executive and former Gov. Gary Herbert spokesperson Ally Isom quits the Republican party. And Utah Republican Rep. Jason Chaffetz plans to continue investigations into Hillary Clinton's emails. 

Jack’s Urban Deer on Wild About Utah

Nov 10, 2016
US FWS Ryan Moehring, Photographer

As I look out my front window, 7 mule deer are cavorting, feeding, with some lying down for a mid-day siesta. With the final week of the regular season deer hunt winding down, some have taken sanctuary from the nimrods to join the urban herd.

Today we speak with Jessica Luther, author of "Unsportsmanlike Conduct." Jessica Luther is and independent writer and investigative journalist living in Austin, Texas. Her work on sports and culture has appeared in the Texas Observer and the Austin Chronicle, and at Sport Illustrated, Texas Monthly, Vice Sports, Guardian Sport, and Bleacher Report.

LiberalAmerica.org

Today we discuss the results of the 2016 Presidential Election. Our listeners call in and share their post election feelings. We are also joined in studio by Dr. Damon Cann and Dr. Michael Lyons, Associate Professors from the Utah State University Political Science Department. To join in this conversation, you can still email us at upraccess@gmail.com. 

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

In 2015 the number of visitors to Yellowstone exceeded four million for the first time. David Quammen, writing in the May 2016 edition of National Geographic magazine, asks "Can we hope to preserve, in the midst of modern America, any such remnant of our continent's primordial landscape, any such sample of true wildness-a gloriously inhospitable place, full of predators and prey, in which nature is still allowed to be red in tooth and claw? Can that sort of place be reconciled with human demands and human convenience?

Today on Access Utah we discuss the companion volume to the international bestseller Letters of Note. It’s an assortment of correspondence that spans centuries and place--and an array of human emotions--written by the famous, the not-so-famous, and the downright infamous.

npr.org

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump rises above Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and independent candidate Evan McMullin in Utah, according to national polls. Incumbent Republican Gov. Gary Herbert holds nearly a 40-point lead over Democratic challenger Mike Weinholtz as election day approaches. And Utah Republican Rep. Jason Chaffetz says he's received death threats over comments made about a new FBI investigation into Hillary Clinton's emails.

Cache County voters are deciding the following question: Should a Cache Water District be created? We’ll talk about it next time on Access Utah. Logan Herald Journal reporter Clayton Gefre will give us some historical context. Then Dave Rayfield, Board Member with Bear River Land Conservancy, will tell us why he thinks voters should vote “yes” and Zach Frankel, Executive Director of Utah Rivers Council, will tell us why he thinks voters should vote “no.” Whether you’re a Cache County voter or not, water issues are front-and-center in our minds all over Utah. 

http://www.moncleronlineshop.net/#from=https://www.google.com/

 

   What’s in a name? Today we’ll explore that question. We’re asking you: What do you think of your name? What was your thought process in naming your children? Are there names that are passed down in your family? Have you ever wanted to change your name? Did you? What’s the most unusual or distinctive name you’ve encountered? How does your name affect you? How do you think your name is perceived?

Ally Wall

Ally Wall spent most of her life in hiding. She was a member of the polygamist sect Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints lead by Warren Jeffs, who they consider to be a prophet of God. He’s currently serving a life sentence in a Texas prison for the sexual assault of underage girls. Ally tells her story about her life in the FLDS community, how she educated herself on the actuality of the sect she was born in, and how she ultimately made the decision to leave.

scbwi.org

BYU English Professor, Chris Crowe, is an award-winning author of books for young adults about the Civil Rights era. He recently gave a couple of talks on the USU campus in Logan as a part of the USU Department of English Speaker series. Crowe is the author of several books, most notably MISSISSIPPI TRIAL, 1955, which won several awards, including the 2003 International Reading Association's Young Adult Novel Award. His nonfiction book, GETTING AWAY WITH MURDER: THE TRUE STORY OF THE EMMETT TILL CASE, was an Jane Addams Honor book.

What do you do when God dies?

It's a question facing millions today, as science reveals a Universe that's self-creating, as American culture departs from Christian social norms, and the idea of God begins to seem implausible at best and barbaric at worst.

 

 

 

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