Programs

christiandaily.com

The woman who says she was raped by a Missionary Training Center president sues the LDS Church and comes forward to tell her story. The state of Utah asks for control of unclaimed water in Bear Lake, prompting concerns from environmentalists about downstream effects. And how Salt Lake City's priorities for an inland port were pushed aside during this year's legislative session. 

CNN.com

Some 200 years after her death, Jane Austen's books are still widely read and loved. Many film adaptations and spin-offs such as 'Pride, Prejudice and Zombies' are also adored by many. The BBC said this about Austen.

"Jane Austen died in 1817, when she was just 41. But in her short life, she exerted more of a lasting influence on British literature and culture than many of her peers who lived twice as long.

'Wilderglyphs' on Wild About Utah

Apr 4, 2018
Ice Pattern Wilderglyph
Josh Boling

Glyph: a word that might evoke images in the mind of ancient Egyptian pictures recounting the trials and triumphs of pharaohs and their people; or Native American rock art meaningfully pecked into a sandstone wall, directing desert travelers toward water. There are others, too, all around us, hiding in plain sight. They are perhaps less noticed because they are not made by humans, but instead by the elements and the wilds. I call them wilderglyphs.

wikicommons

Fifty years after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., just one in 10 African Americans think the United States has achieved all or most of the goals of the civil rights movement. That’s according to a recent poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. On Wednesday’s Access Utah, on the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s death, we’ll talk about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., his legacy, and the future of the ideals he so eloquently articulated and strove for.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. being interviewed by the press.
Pixaby

On April 3, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. found himself in Memphis, Tennessee to lend support to a sanitation workers’ strike.  

USA Today

Last week USU’s Department of Languages Philosophy and Speech Communications hosted a panel discussion titled “Meaning and #MeToo.” Panelists discussed the #MeToo movement and provided historical, cultural, and legal analysis. On Tuesday’s Access Utah we’ll continue the discussion with the panelists: Erica Holberg, USU Assistant Professor of Philosophy; Mattie Burkert, USU Assistant Professor of English; and Nicole Vouvalis, Director of USU’s Institutional Review Board Office.

AL.com

This episode of Access Utah is part of the “Democracy and the Informed Citizen” Initiative administered by the Federation of State Humanities Councils in partnership with the Pulitzer Prizes Board for a collaboration between UPR, Utah Humanities, and The Salt Lake City Library. The initiative seeks to deepen the public’s knowledge and appreciation of the vital connections between democracy, the humanities, journalism, and an informed citizenry. The initiative is supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

 

MSNBC

Mitt Romney takes a hard stance on Dreamers and suggests a merit-based U.S. immigration system. Utah Gov. Gary Herbert signs a Medicaid expansion bill that will cover 70,000 needy Utahns, if the federal government approves it. And a look back at this past weekend's student-led march against gun violence as well as the counter demonstration by gun rights activists.  

 

Wikicommons

The UPR Original Series “King’s Road: Where Do We Go From Here?” is an exploration of the ongoing civil rights movement through a contemporary study of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy 50 years after his assassination. 

UPR

It’s the final pledge drive special edition of Access Utah for our Spring drive today. My special guests this hour are some of the great people who have served as student interns and producers of Access Utah. We’ll be talking with Dani Hayes, Adison Pace, Katie Swain, Bennett Purser, Aimee Cobabe and Connor Rivers. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our most memorable episodes. We’ll revisit discussions about lifting the ban on gay Boy Scouts, and about Sex Positivity. And we’ll hear some music from our program on the history of the Banjo.

City Weekly

It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is Ken Sanders from Ken Sanders Rare Books in Salt Lake City. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our favorite episodes of the program.

TEDX USU

It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is folklorist and USU Assistant Professor of English Lynne McNeill. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some great episodes of the program.

Coming soon to Utah Public Radio, “King’s Road: Where Do We Go From Here?” A five-part radio series exploring the ongoing Civil Rights Movement through a contemporary study of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy 50 years after his assassination.

Radioline

 It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is former UPR Station Manager Richard Meng. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of my most memorable interviews. We’ll hear from explorer and educator Helen Thayer; indomitable Holocaust survivor Eva Kor; and singer-songwriter Rosalie Sorrells.

Business Insider

Utah Congressman John Curtis is accused of ignoring sexual harassment allegations against his chief of police while he was Mayor of Provo. State Rep. Mike Noel, R-Kanab, gets flack for not disclosing how he could benefit from the Lake Powell Pipeline project he advocated for in the legislature. And a number of Utahns are deciding whether or not to break ties with Facebook, as a global movement to delete accounts gains steam. 

Dani Hayes / Utah Public Radio

 


It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is former UPR Program Director and Access Utah host Lee Austin. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of  interviews Lee conducted with writer Gore Vidal and former Utah Poet Laureate Ken Brewer. We’ll also hear a portion of a special broadcast on the history of Capitol Reef National Park. We’ll talk about the history of Access Utah and the public affairs programs that preceded this program. And we’ll invite you to pledge your support to UPR to ensure that Access Utah and all the programming you value continues strong.

millennial Mormons are leaving the church at a higher rate than any past generation. LDS families are finding ways to bridge these faith divides.
visitutah.org

In 2014, the Pew Research Center conducted a study of 35,000 Americans called the Religious Landscape Study. They found that about a third of all millennials raised in Mormonism no longer identify with the faith.

helenwhitney.com

We don’t know how. We don’t know when. But death comes for us all. 

mkaku.org

Physicist and futurist Michio Kaku says that moving human civilization to the stars, formerly the domain of fiction, is increasingly becoming a scientific possibility–and a necessity.

Penguin Random House

Dr. Anne Spoerry treated hundreds of thousands of people across rural Kenya over the span of fifty years. A member of the renowned Flying Doctors Service, the French-born Spoerry learned how to fly a plane at the age of forty-five and earned herself the cherished nickname, "Mama Daktari"--"Mother Doctor"--from the people of Kenya. Yet few knew what drove her from post-World War II Europe to Africa. Now, in the first comprehensive account of her life, Dr.

Bonneville Cutthroat Trout
Shauna Leavitt

In the 1970s, many feared Utah’s native fish, the Bonneville Cutthroat Trout, was extinct.

A search began and in a short time, with a sigh of relief, state managers were able to report the Bonneville cutthroat trout was still in Utah’s rivers and streams, but the sub-species was imperiled and had experienced dramatic reductions in abundance and distribution rangewide.

KUTV

Thousands of Utah high school students walked out of their classrooms Wednesday in protest of gun violence. We get the reaction to that, as well as the reaction to the many Utah legislators who announced they will not be running for reelection. All of this and more on this edition of Behind The Headlines. 

At 9 a.m. Friday, Salt Lake Tribune reporters Lee Davidson and Benjamin Wood, and columnist Robert Gehrke join KCPW’s Roger McDonough to reflect on the session and talk about the week’s top stories.

Weller Book Works

Patty Rayman was born with the ability to communicate with animals and has helped thousands of people resolve many types of behavior, health, attitude and relationship issues with their animal companions. In working with all types of animals, she has developed techniques to help people move from conflict to cooperation in their relationships.

Andrea Smardon

Our series LGBTQ: Off The Grid, explores the far corners of Utah where lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender people, and those questioning their sexuality are often isolated and unseen. In this story, a family turns a Mormon tradition on its head to create a gathering place for LGBTQ teenagers. 

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