Programs

Criminologist Grant Duwe told public radio’s Here & Now program in 2013 that mass murder rates and mass public shootings have been on the decline. He said that 0.2 percent of all homicides in the U.S. are mass murders, and of those, 10 percent are mass public killings, such as those in Newtown and Aurora. Duwe said “I think it’s important for everyone to understand the cases that receive extensive coverage, that those aren’t the only mass murders that take place within the U.S.  Within a given year, there are about 30 mass murders that occur in this country.” He says that the more common mass murder occurs when a male head of household kills his partner and his children, then himself.  In the wake of the San Bernardino and other mass shootings, we’ll ask Grant Duwe to provide context and review some of the history on Wednesday’s Access Utah. We’ll talk mental illness, guns, media, and much more.  

 

 

 


www.playthepartbook.com/

Gina Barnett has coached executives and leaders worldwide from Fortune 500 companies to start-ups, small businesses and non-profits. She has been speaker coach for TED Talks for the past five years.

 

In her book, “Play the Part: Master Body Signals to Connect and Communicate for Business Success,” Barnett focuses on embodiment: how the body affects our thoughts and emotions and, in turn, how we engage and are perceived.

    

flickr.com

Join us for a live broadcast of Access Utah from the State Capitol on Monday for the opening day of the 2016 Utah Legislature. We'll talk about the issues likely to be addressed in the legislature this year. Our guests will include Governor Gary Herbert, House Majority Leader, Rep. Jim Dunnigan, R-Taylorsville; House Minority Leader, Rep Brian King, D-Salt Lake City; Senate Majority Leader, Sen. Ralph Okerlund; R-Monroe; and Senate Minority Leader, Sen. Gene Davis, D-Salt Lake City.


Public Land's Bill, Election Reform & More On Behind The Headlines

Jan 22, 2016
publiclands.utah.gov

Jan. 22nd, 2016- Congressmen Rob Bishop and Jason Chaffetz unveil their public lands proposal. Utah’s lieutenant governor stands behind signature gathering. And Utahns like the job Governor Gary Herbert is doing, but it’s a different story for the state legislature. 


http://www.howtoletgomovie.com/

The 2016 Sundance Film Festival opens in Park City on Thursday. UPR's Sundance Correspondent Steve Smith is in Park City and will join Tom Williams on Thursday's Access Utah to set the scene and tell us about the films he's excited about. Then we'll talk with two filmmakers whose films are showing at Sundance.

Lee Benson of the Deseret News recently wrote a nice profile of Jim Steenburgh, author of “Secrets of the Greatest Snow on Earth.” And with fresh powder on the ground, we thought this a great time to revisit our conversation from November 2014.

For a generation, some of the money we’ve spent at the gas station and the mall has gone to empower the authoritarians and the armed groups that have given us our worst foreign-born crises. How can we get ourselves out of business with hostile petrocrats and the violent extremists?

  


useu.usmission.gov

Jan. 15th, 2016 - President Obama gives his final State of the Union address. Rep. Jason Chaffetz proposes a bill that would cut allowances for former presidents. A recently-released video draws more questions about the 2015 shooting death of James Barker. And sexual assault in Utah costs the state nearly $5 billion annually, according to a new report. 


Moab resident Steph Davis is a superstar in the climbing community. But when her husband made a controversial climb of Delicate Arch, the media fallout and the toll on her marriage left her without a partner, a career, a source of income...or a purpose. Accompanied by her beloved dog, Fletch, she set off in search of a new identity and discovered skydiving.  


Image of Jan Brett Book, The Turnip
penguinrandomhouse.com

What do you do with that beautiful Poinsettia now that the holidays are over? How does Badger remove a giant turnip from the garden? Jerry Goodspeed, and author Jan Brett are on today's Zesty Garden along with Nancy Williams and a turnip reading on Petals and Prose.

Poinsettia Protection Link

The National Park Service turns 100 on August 25, 2016 and today we’re kicking off a series of programs focusing on America’s national parks.


National Geographic

“Cars, for Americans, more than anything else represent freedom.” So says Matt Hardigree, executive director of Jalopnik.com, who is featured in National Geographic Channel’s  documentary film, “Driving America.” The film examines how car culture has changed the way we live, work, travel and socialize; and looks into the future, including potential game changers like Tesla’s electric cars.  

http://coloradoreview.colostate.edu/books/the-logan-notebooks/

My guest for the hour today is poet Rebecca Lindenberg. Clouds, mountains, flowering trees. Difficult things. Things lost by being photographed. Things that have lost their power. Things found in a rural grocery store. These are some of the lists, poems, prose poems, and lyric anecdotes compiled in “The Logan Notebooks,” a remix and a reimagining of The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon, a collection of intimate and imaginative observations about place—a real place, an interior landscape—and identity, at the intersection of the human with the world, and the language we have (and do not yet have) for perceiving it.

 

 

 


mediamatters.org

  

Jan. 8th, 2016 - On this week's Behind The Headlines, a Bundy-led militia takes over a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon, and the LDS Church denounces their actions. President Obama takes executive action to increase background checks in an attempt at reducing gun violence. Jackie Biskupski is sworn in as mayor of Salt Lake City. And a new inversion forecast can predict Utah air quality up to 30 days out.


Photo of a face mite.
California Academy of Sciences

Welcome to the new year and a new season of the Zesty Garden! Today on the show is a live conversation with USU Extension Entomologist Diane Alston about face mites and jumping wasp larvae, then Helen Cannon revisits orchids on Petals and Prose.


University Press of Colorado

In her new book, “Epiphany in the Wilderness: Hunting, Nature, and Performance in the Nineteenth-Century American West,” historian Karen Jones uses the metaphor of the theater to argue that the West was a crucial stage that framed the performance of the American character as an independent, resourceful, resilient, and rugged individual. 


According to recent studies, 50% of us set New Year's resolutions and 78% of us fail to keep them. But there's something compelling in the idea of a new you in the new year. Should we set New Year's resolutions? How do we keep them past, say, February? We'll ask you what you do and what successes or failures you've had. 

“The West was once seen as a beacon of opportunity, and it is still a place where many ways of life can flourish. But it is also a region that leaves some people isolated both culturally and geographically.” That’s David Kennedy, from his foreword to a collection of essays titled “Bridging the Distance: Common Issues of the Rural West.”

 

 

 

 

 


http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/10/politics-mental-illness-history-213276

  Alex Thompson, writing in Politico Magazine, says “Political taboos, campaign dealbreakers and electoral glass ceilings are crumbling. Members of Congress are openly gay and bisexual, there’s a black man in the White House, and a woman may be next. Voters have accepted all sorts of behavioral warts and missteps in their political candidates, too. DUIs? A mistake of their youth. Draft dodgers? There’s a long list. Womanizers? A much longer list. Illegal drugs? In just a few short elections, we’ve gone from a president who “didn’t inhale” to one who openly admits using cocaine in his youth.

Yet one large taboo remains stubbornly fixed—mental illness. Sure, it’s part of the conversation, in that pundits these days can, and do, speculate casually about whether Donald Trump has narcissistic personality disorder, Joe Biden has slid into depression, Hillary Clinton is clinically paranoid or Jeb Bush will be undone by a Freudian sibling tangle. But here’s the really sick thing: For a politician to admit to seeing a psychiatrist would likely be far more politically damaging than any of the possible symptoms of actual mental illness.”

 

On Monday's Access Utah, Alex Thompson will join the discussion and provide insight into a world of high expectations and powerful stigmas. In the upcoming year, could America elect a mentally ill president? And what might be the implications?

 

 

Utah's Top Stories of 2015

Dec 25, 2015
bigstory.ap.org

  

Dec. 25, 2015 - In 2015, Salt Lake City elected its first gay mayor, LDS church leaders grappled with the reality of gay marriage, lawmakers decided to move the Utah State Prison, flash floods claimed 21 lives in Southern Utah and the public lands debate raged on. 

 

 


UPR Presents: Folks Over For Christmas

Dec 23, 2015
calliopehouse.org

Utah Public Radio presents "Folks Over For Christmas" with hosts Kirsten Swanson and Jessica Sonderegger.

UPR invited some of Utah's wonderful musicians to join us in studio to share some of their own music and Christmas arrangements.

Jennifer Pemberton

The Colorado River flows for over 1400 miles through four U.S. states, though it drains seven. It’s sometimes called the American Nile because nearly every drop of it is used by the civilization of the American West. Over 90% of the river is diverted and consumed by nearly 40 million people -- not all of whom live in its watershed. It’s a lifeline in a desert -- something to fight over. But when it gets squeezed through the tight canyons it has carved for itself it creates dramatic places for adventure. And it sure is pretty.

Today on The Source, three stories of the Colorado River. One about a wooden boat named for a place on the Colorado River that wouldn’t be there if it weren’t for a conservation great named Martin Litton. Also, two guys named Eric talk about Lake Powell. And finally the story of two bodies of water that kissed for the first time in a long time.

Join us for the Access Utah Holiday Special 2015. We’ll hear music for the season performed by the Lightwood Duo (Mike Christiansen on guitar and Eric Nelson on clarinet). We’ll also hear readings for the season by the author of The Christmas Chronicles, playwright Tim Slover. 


Ginny on Flickr.com

Periodically we join together as a UPR community to share what we're reading. On Wednesday's Access Utah we're doing it again, but with a twist: We want your list of the best books of 2015.
 

Elaine Thatcher joins me in studio and we'll hear from Anne Holman from The King's English Book Shop in Salt Lake City, Andy Nettell from Back of Beyond Books in Moab and Catherine Weller of Weller Book Works in Salt Lake City.


www.dailydot.com

On Today’s Access Utah we continue our series on Mass Shootings in America by asking how the media should respond. Our guests include Tom Teves, whose son Alex was killed in the mass shooting in Aurora Colorado. Teves is a founder of No Notoriety a campaign that urges news outlets to limit how much they use a gunman’s name and photograph. Tom Teves says the hope is to curb shootings by denying many perpetrators what they want: fame.

 

We’ll also be speaking to Deseret News reporter Chandra Johnson, whose series of articles on mass shootings can be found in the Deseret News National Edition.


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