Programs

In the spring of 2005, acclaimed environmental photographer James Balog headed to the Arctic on a tricky assignment for National Geographic: to capture images to help tell the story of the Earth’s changing climate. Even with a scientific upbringing, Balog had been a skeptic about climate change. But that first trip north opened his eyes to the biggest story in human history and sparked a challenge within him that would put his career and his very well-being at risk.

 Laura McBride is a writer and community college teacher in Las Vegas, Nevada. She says that she appreciates the beautiful and explosive possibilities of her home town: a community in which the conventional and social boundaries are unusually fluid, and where she has witnessed the power of second chances.

 

  All her life, Emily felt different from other kids. Between therapist visits, sudden uncontrollable bursts of anger, and unexplained episodes of dizziness, things never felt right. For years, her only escape was through the stories she crafted. It wasn’t until a near-fatal accident when she was twelve years old that Emily and her family discovered the truth: a grapefruit-size brain tumor at the base of her skull.

The Three-Leaf Sumac on Wild About Utah

Aug 12, 2016
Hansen’s Northwest Native Plant Database

  Many think of the desert as a hot, dry, barren, and unforgiving place. However, Utah’s deserts are chock full of interesting and diverse plants and animals! One such plant, which grows throughout much of Utah, is rhus trilobata or three-leaf sumac. 

pbs.org

Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill finds police involved in the shooting of Abdullahhi Mohamed "justified" in their actions. Incumbent Republican Rep. Mia Love surpasses Democratic opponent Doug Owens in a recent poll. Brigham Young University graduate Evan McMullin jumps into the presidential race as a "Never Trump" option. And a report estimates that local ozone pollution results in the deaths of 13 people in Salt Lake City per year.

 Annie Bell can't escape the dust. It's in her hair, covering the windowsills, coating the animals in the barn, in the corners of her children's dry, cracked lips. It's 1934 and the Bell farm in Mulehead, Oklahoma is struggling as the earliest storms of The Dust Bowl descend. All around them the wheat harvests are drying out and people are packing up their belongings as storms lay waste to the Great Plains. As the Bells wait for the rains to come, Annie and each member of her family are pulled in different directions.

Sacred Mountains On Wild About Utah

Aug 10, 2016
fs.usda.gov

I just completed teaching a 5 day Utah Master Naturalist course through USU extension on Utah mountains. The course allowed me to revisit the immense influence these lofty lumps in the earth’s crust have had on my life, and the life of so many others.

John Palfrey, founding president of the Digital Public Library of America and a director of Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society, told the Deseret News that he has “been struck by the number of times people tell [him] that they think libraries are less important than they were before, now that we have the Internet and Google.

  Artist, researcher, and writer Jonathan Bailey is out with a new book: "Rock Art: A Vision of a Vanishing Cultural Landscape"

http://nakednutrition.life/

  Amy Choate says that her passion for a plant-based, whole food lifestyle is due to her complete recovery from debilitating depression and illness that occurred during her service as a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Annie Miller says that as a young married woman, she began to learn from her mother-in-law that not all prepared/canned/packaged foods are nutritious. She began to prepare most everything from “scratch” and says she learned to unlock the magic of food by using fresh herbs and spices.


corrections.utah.gov

A former Utah State University student is cut from the Atlanta Falcons lineup based on four different accusations of sexual assault. Outdoor recreation businesses throw support behind designating Bears Ears a national monument. The state zooms in on land near the Great Salt Lake for the prison relocation site. And Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson makes comments on religious freedom and Mormonism.

http://autismshow.org/templegrandin/

  Today we revisit an episode from March 2016:

Imagine a blackout lasting not days, but weeks or months. Tens of millions of people over several states are affected. For those without access to a generator, there is no running water, no sewage, no refrigeration or light. Food and medical supplies are dwindling. Devices we rely on have gone dark. Banks no longer function, looting is widespread, and law and order are being tested as never before.

When Michael Copperman left Stanford University for the Mississippi Delta in 2002 - recruited by Teach for America - he imagined he would lift underprivileged children from the narrow horizons of rural poverty. Well-meaning but naïve, the Asian-American from the West Coast says he soon lost his bearings in a world divided between black and white. Trying to help students, he often found he couldn’t afford to give what they required―sometimes with heartbreaking consequences.

Bird Banding in Red Butte Canyon on Wild About Utah

Jul 29, 2016
Jessie Bunkley

The Biodiversity and Conservation Ecology lab's work focuses on how human-land use affects different types of wildlife.

http://kuer.org/post/city-working-combat-price-gouging-taxis#stream/0

 

  A state judge officially dismisses public corruption charges against former Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff. Riders complain about price gouging by Salt Lake airport taxis. Gov. Gary Herbert speaks out against designating Bears Ears as a monument at a hearing hosted by Republican Sen. Mike Lee. And Hillary Clinton becomes the Democratic presidential nominee at the convention in Philadelphia. 

 

 

In the wake of U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell’s recent visit to the area being proposed by some for designation as Bear’s Ears National Monument, we’ll consider anew public lands issues in Utah. Reps. Rob Bishop and Jason Chaffetz have released their Public Lands Initiative legislation for consideration by the U.S. House of Representatives. Rep. Chris Stewart has introduced an amendment to the Interior Appropriations Bill that would restrict the president’s ability to create national monuments in Utah and other areas, under the Antiquities Act. And the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition is pushing for President Obama to create a national monument in southern Utah.

  Medical researcher and ICU physician Samuel M. Brown says “While writing a book about death culture and American religion before the Civil War, I read hundreds of accounts of the ‘good death.’ I began to wonder why good dying was incredibly rare in the hospitals where I practiced medicine.”

 

Fandom & Ownership

Jul 26, 2016
http://news.wgbh.org/post/zombies-robots-and-24-straight-hours-sci-fi-films

In December 2015, Paramount and CBS sued the producers of a proposed fan-supported feature length movie called "Axanar" which was to be set in the Star Trek universe. Included in the issues at dispute was the question: who owns the Klingon language and can a language, albeit an invented one, be copyrighted?


 

   Utah Lake's algal bloom proves problematic in Utah, Salt Lake and Davis Counties. Davis County Attorney Troy Rawlings seeks dismissal of all charges against former Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff. A caregiver of a Utah man who died from Zika virus has also contracted the virus. And GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump is named the official nominee of the party at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Pioneer Day Edible Native Plants On Wild About Utah

Jul 21, 2016
nps.gov

  With Pioneer Days looming, let’s explore a bit of our local heritage.

Following several days of cold and snowy weather in early May, my friend and USU graduate student Ian Keller and I approached the Mormon Handcart outpost near Evanston Wyoming on Deseret Land & Livestock Company land. We braved the elements to deliver a seminar to 8 missionary couples on Mormon pioneer use of wild plants as they struggled toward the Promised Land of Salt Lake Valley.

Backbeat Books

The banjo is emblematic of American country music. It is at the core of other important musical movements, including jazz and ragtime, and has played an important part in the development many genres, such as folk, bluegrass, and rock. The instrument has been adopted by many cultures and has been ingrained into many musical traditions, from Mento music in the Caribbean to dance music in Ireland. Virtuosos such as Bela Fleck have played Bach, African music, and Christmas tunes on the five-string banjo, and the instrument has had a resurgence in pop music with such acts a Mumford and Sons and the Avett Brothers.

Bat Netting at Antelope Island State Park On Wild About Utah

Jul 20, 2016
adfg.alaska.gov

 

Bats use sound to detect their surroundings. They produce frequencies that are much higher than what we’re able to hear and as those sound waves hit objects in front of them and reflect off the bats interpret the echoes to sense their environment. 

Butterflies on Wild About Utah

Jul 20, 2016
fws.gov

Rivaling flowers and tropical fish in their beauty, butterflies or lepidopterans, have been icons of peace and reverence for millennia. 

Pages