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John McColgan, Bureau of Land Management

Discussing Utah's Wildfires On Tuesday's Access Utah

“In our region fire is to dry forests as rain is to rainforests; both are important in the life of a forest to provide clean water, climate stabilization, hunting and fishing, outdoor recreation and wildlife habitat. A fire does not destroy a forest; rather, it simply resets nature’s clock as it has been doing for millennia,” said Chad Hanson, Director and Ecologist with the John Muir Project, Earth Island Institute, and co-editor of “The Ecological Importance of Mixed-Severity Fires: Nature’s Phoenix”
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Groups Criticize Nation's First Tar Sands Mine

3 hours ago
cooldavis.org

The Canadian company U.S. Oil Sands is set to open the United States’ first ever tar sands mine in eastern Utah’s Book Cliffs. The move has encountered heavy criticism, mainly from environmental activists.

Tar sands mining extracts bitumen from the earth, which is then processed into oil at a refinery. Raphael Cordroy, spokesperson with Utah Tar Sands Resistance, said that tar sands mining releases pollutants from what’s left over after bitumen is obtained.

New Money For Sage Grouse Conservation Announced

3 hours ago
PBS.org

  U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack announced a program on Thursday called Sage Grouse Initiative 2.0, in which he allocated $211 million for conservation efforts throughout the West. The initiative provides ranchers with resources to make conservation efforts on their own private land economically viable. The initiative is expected to conserve 8 million acres of land by 2018.

Terry Messmer, the director of the community-based conservation program, has been involved with Sage-Grouse conservation for over 20 years.  

 

Utah Ranked 4th In Aerospace Manufacturing

4 hours ago
http://business.utah.gov/industries/aerospace-defense/

 

Utah took fourth place in the most recent 2015 Aerospace Manufacturing Attractiveness Rankings, which was funded by Pricewaterhouse Coopers, a tax audit company.  

 

Scott Thompson, a U.S. Aerospace and Defense Assurance Leader, said the study took into consideration the size and scale of the current statewide aerospace industry, education opportunities, manufacturing costs and taxes.

 

“Utah scored extremely well in the top ten in terms of its industry and tax cost,” Thompson said.

Trying to divine what the future holds is an ancient human preoccupation. And for centuries, soothsayers have sought answers in the bottom of a teacup.

Amy Taylor was 18 when she stumbled into the practice of reading tea leaves. Now 46 and a professional tea-leaf reader, she remembers looking into her stepsister's teacup at a Toronto restaurant, and saying, "Oh, that's funny, that looks like a tree." She says she looked at all of her family's cups that night, and saw things in all of them. "I just thought that was really odd," she says.

At a festival on the Danish island of Fyn, Claus Holm, a fast-talking Danish celebrity chef, is sniffing and mixing into a pot of stew an ingredient he calls "totally forbidden." It's cream, and it expires today.

Danes' increasing willingness to buy and consume items like just-expired dairy products has helped make them, arguably, the world champions in the fight against food waste. According to a recent report from the Danish government, Danes now throw away 25 percent less food than they did five years ago.

John McColgan, Bureau of Land Management

“In our region fire is to dry forests as rain is to rainforests; both are important in the life of a forest to provide clean water, climate stabilization, hunting and fishing, outdoor recreation and wildlife habitat. A fire does not destroy a forest; rather, it simply resets nature’s clock as it has been doing for millennia,” said Chad Hanson, Director and Ecologist with the John Muir Project, Earth Island Institute, and co-editor of “The Ecological Importance of Mixed-Severity Fires: Nature’s Phoenix”


On Monday's Access Utah we discuss the recruitment of western peoples by ISIS, the extremist militant group terrorizing Iraq and Syria. The group, utilizing social media, has managed to lure thousands of young adults from the United States, Canada and Europe to join their efforts in the Middle East. On the program today we speak with Christianne Bourdreau, a Canadian mother whose works to prevent the ISIS' recruitment follows the death of her son, Damian Clairmont, who died in Syria after relocating and fighting for the Islamic State. Christian Bourdreau now works with the Mothers For Life network, which aims to build support for mothers who have experienced Jihadist radicalization. Joining us for the hour is also Dr. Anne Speckhard, Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry in the School of Medicine and of Security Studies in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Dr. Speckhard talks about the discourse and ideology of terrorism recruitment, which she details in her new book "Bride of ISIS." 


Logan Hospital Adds Physical Therapy Pools

Aug 28, 2015

On Monday, Logan Regional Hospital announced the addition of several physical therapy pools to the medical center’s occupational therapy wing.

Many older patients use the pools in order to take pressure off of joints. Rich Hall, Director of Sports Medicine and Rehab with Logan Regional Hospital, said that patients of all ages have benefited from physical therapy pools.

ACLU Utah Launches New Public Defense Campaign

Aug 27, 2015
acslaw.org

  August 27 marks the four year anniversary of the ACLU of Utah’s report entitled Failing Gideon. ACLU communications director Anna Brower says the report found Utah’s public defense system was failing on all ten of the principles set forward by the American Bar Association.

Study: Federal Drug Sentences Increasing

Aug 27, 2015
justicepolicycenter.org

According to a study released Thursday by the Pew Charitable Trusts, the average sentence for federal drug offenders has risen 36 percent since 1980. According to Adam Gelb, Director of Pew’s Public Safety Performance Project, that’s indicative of a broken justice system. 

The number of federal prisoners with drug-related offenses has risen from 5,000 in 1980 to 95,000 today. That’s 49 percent of the prison population. Gelb said that the policies enacted over thirty years ago have not proven to be the best approach.

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