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More Black Bear Hunting Permits On The Way?

The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources is proposing to expand the number of permits and areas in which black bears can be hunted in the state. DWR Mammals Coordinator Leslie McFarlane said the number of black bears in Utah has more than doubled since the 1990s. “We estimate that we’ve got about 4,100 bears, if not probably a little more than that, and most of them live in our mountainous areas of the state,” McFarlane said. The increase in the bear population has led to more conflict with both people and livestock. The DWR says in an average year 50 bears are euthanized after coming into contact humans and animals; however, in 2014 that number increased to 81 bears.
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StoryCorps promotes the day after Thanksgiving as a National Day of Listening, saying that  listening, sharing and recording stories of family members and friends is the least expensive but most meaningful gift you can give this holiday season. Access Utah has promoted this concept for a few years now, and Wednesday we’ll continue the tradition. We’ll invite you to share your story.

  Our guests will include USU Folklife Archives Curator Randy Williams, who recently completed an audio collection: “The Central Utah Project: Capturing Utah’s Share of the Colorado River,” and USU Professor of Anthropology and Affiliate Professor of Religious Studies, Bonnie Glass-Coffin, who has recorded stories of religious diversity as a part USU’s Interfaith Initiative.

A big winter storm spinning its way across the East Coast of the United States is expected to wreak havoc on Thanksgiving Day travel plans.

The National Weather Service says that travelers from the Carolinas all the way up to New England could see significant snow, and the entire East Coast will see some kind of precipitation.

Weather.com reports:

It's like the start of a bad joke: a vegan, a gluten-free and a paleo walk into a bar — except it's your house, and they're gathered around your Thanksgiving table.

More and more Americans are passing on gluten — some for medical reasons, most by choice. Others are adopting diets that exclude meat, or insisting on the kinds of unprocessed foods that early man would have hunted and gathered.

All of this is a challenge to the traditional Thanksgiving feast.

Proposed Tuition Increase Stirs Up Student Opposition On Utah Campus

21 hours ago
huntsmanschool.blogspot.com

In an email sent to students Nov. 18, administrators from the John M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University announced a proposal to increase the school’s differential tuition. The proposal would increase the business school’s tuition by $20 per credit hour for undergraduates. The move has sparked a debate on the USU campus over the rising cost of going to college.

utah capitol
April Ashland / Utah Public Radio

With the Utah Legislative session now less than two months away, Utah lawmakers are being asked to consider adding a couple of weeks to the annual 45-day session.

Because lawmakers don't meet on weekends during the session, the actual number of days spend legislating is nearer to 32 or 33. Last week a legislative committee forwarded the idea of amending the Utah constitution to stipulate that lawmakers should meet for a full 45 days within a 90-day calendar period. State representative John Westwood of Cedar City feels that more time just makes for more mischief.

"I am not for extensions. We have 45 days to conduct our business. We've done that, we want to remain efficient and take care of our bills and not extend it and bring in more bills. Sorry, I'm not for that. More is not always better," Westwood said.

telegraph.co.uk

    

austinchronicle.com

We’ve had some time now to see how the Affordable Care Act is working. On Tuesday’s AU we’ll ask you what your experience has been and what you think about the ACA going forward. The Utah Health Policy Project’s annual policy conference coming up on December 2nd is titled “Is It Working? Taking the Pulse on Health Reform in Utah.” The conference will tackle several questions: Which states are succeeding? What’s different about the 2015 marketplaces? What should Utah do to cover the Medicaid expansion coverage gap?

Our guests will include Rep. Jim Dunnigan, R-Taylorsville, Co-Chairman of the Utah Legislature’s Health Reform Task Force; Katherine Howitt, Senior Policy Analyst with Community Catalyst; and Utah Health Policy Project’s Education and Communications Director, Jason Stevenson.


After sitting through hours of testimony and reading through thousands of pages of documents, a grand jury decided that there was not enough probable cause to indict police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old.

Their decision, like the shooting that led up to all this, sparked violent protests overnight in Ferguson, Mo.

Ching Farm Animal Rescue.

At the Ching Farm’s Thanksgiving dinner earlier this month there wasn’t any Turkey on the menu. Instead, the goal of the 16th annual Vegan Thanksgiving dinner was to help turkeys and other animals that call the Riverton-based animal sanctuary home. The Ching animal sanctuary provides a place to live for farm animals that were destined for slaughter. It holds a fundraising Thanksgiving feast each year to keep the farm going.

Rescue Executive Director and farm founder Faith Ching said various community groups provide food for the dinner, which is attended by 300 people each year.

“We have the traditional everything," Ching said. "From the cranberry sauce to the mashed potatoes and all of that…it’s just vegan. Everything tastes the same, it’s just that we don’t have to hurt any animals to do it."

wikipedia.org

Are corporations people? The U.S. Supreme Court says they are, at least for some purposes.  NPR’s Nina Totenberg reports that in the past four years, the high court has dramatically expanded corporate rights. It ruled that corporations have the right to spend money in candidate elections, and that some for-profit corporations may, on religious grounds, refuse to comply with a federal mandate to cover birth control in their employee health plans. 

Some have noted that if we take the idea of corporate personhood literally, some corporate “citizens” display sociopathic tendencies. On Monday’s AU, In the first in a four-part series we’ll discuss the history of corporations and how they’ve reached the status they enjoy today. Our guests will include Adrian Wooldridge, Management Editor of The Economist and co-author of “The Company: A Short History of a Revolutionary Idea.” William Shughart, J. Fish Smith Professor in Public Choice in the USU Huntsman School of Business and Research Director and Senior Fellow at the Independent Institute in Oakland. We’ll look at the the rise of corporations in the U.S. through the court rulings and economic climate of the times.  

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