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College: I'll Only Go If I Know (That I Can Afford It)

It's Financial Aid Week here at the NPR Ed Team (not really, but it sure feels like it). And we're kicking things off with a nostalgia nugget for all you children of the '80s.The old G.I. Joe animated series famously ended with the phrase, "Now I know! And knowing is half the battle."It's a catchy line and, it turns out, eerily relevant when it comes to high school seniors debating their college options.Last week, researchers released a survey that found students were more likely to say they...
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Friday, March 27th

9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

Deedee Corradini, the only female mayor in the history of Salt Lake City and a past president of Women’s Ski Jumping USA, has passed away at 70 years old.

A statement released by her family on Monday read, “Our amazing mother, wife, sister, aunt, friend and mentor, died today at her home in Park City, surrounded by the light, love and gratitude of her loved ones.”

Corradini’s death comes after a six-month battle with a non-smoking form of lung cancer.

As wildlife populations increase, so does the potential for human-wildlife conflicts, which can be seen in in economic losses, regulatory conflicts, and sometimes, physical encounters. Terry Messmer, Director of the Berryman Institute at USU, says that wildlife managers may need to change their traditional emphasis from sustaining or increasing wildlife populations to mitigating conflicts. On Monday's AU we'll talk about potential effects of listing the Sage-grouse as an endangered species and of delisting the wolf. We'll also consider the phenomenon of urban deer and the management of wild horses and burros. We'll ask you what you think about these issues and we'd also like to know if you've had an encounter with, say, a mountain lion or a bear. Joining the discussion today is Terry Messmer and Michael Wolfe, Emeritus professor of Wildlife Ecology and Management at Utah State University.


When you ask people what impacts health you'll get a lot of different answers: Access to good health care and preventative services, personal behavior, exposure to germs or pollution and stress. But if you dig a little deeper you'll find a clear dividing line, and it boils down to one word: money.

Days after video emerged showing self-declared Islamic State extremists taking sledge hammers to pre-Islamic antiquities inside the Mosul museum, the Iraqi government has reopened the country's national museum, shuttered since the 2003 U.S. invasion of the country that toppled Saddam Hussein.

In Florida, archaeologists are investigating a site that a century ago sparked a scientific controversy. Today, it's just a strip of land near an airport.

But in 1915, it was a spot that became world-famous because of the work of Elias Sellards, Florida's state geologist. Sellards led a scientific excavation of the site, where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized animal bones and then, human remains.

Andy Hemmings of Mercyhurst University is the lead archaeologist on a project that has picked up where Sellards left off a century ago.

Humane Society Offers Reward After Deer Found Dead

Feb 27, 2015

The Humane Society of Utah is offering a $2,000 reward for information about the killing of a pregnant deer and two fawns that were run down with a car.

In a statement released Thursday, the group said they are looking for information leading to an arrest and conviction of whoever chased the animals through a Box Elder County grain field. The animals were run over on Feb. 14 or 15.

Humane Society Director Deann Shepherd talks about the $2,000 reward.

Seth McConnell/The Denver Post/Getty Images

A medical marijuana bill has passed its first test in the Utah State Legislature.

Republican Senator Mark Madsen raised eyebrows at the general legislative session this year when he revealed his intention to sponsor medical marijuana legislation. But Thursday’s hearing in the Senate Judiciary, Law Enforcement, and Criminal Justice Committee was the first time Senate Bill 259 was vetted publicly.

bustos.house.gov

New legislation may require Utah high school students to pass a citizenship test in order to graduate. After receiving approval from the Senate in a vote of 20-8, the bill is in its final stages in the House of Representatives.

Introduced by Sen. Howard Stephenson (R-Draper), the bill would require students to answer 50 questions on American Government and get 75 percent correct before receiving a high school diploma. The test would be similar to a citizenship test, which requires knowledge of principles of American Government, American History and Integrated Civics. However, citizenship tests only require a minimum score of 60 percent.

GOVERNOR'S OFFICE

On Wednesday, Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes announced that he is stopping the advancement of the Healthy Utah bill. Hughes’ announcement came hours after Gov. Gary Herbert said he felt optimistic about Healthy Utah, which would provide healthcare coverage to 60,000 to 70,000 Utahns.

The Senate passed the bill in a vote of 21 - 8 on Wednesday. It was then sent to the House Rules Committee, where it was given a favorable recommendation. However, Hughes insisted that there aren’t enough votes among House Republicans to advance it further.

Last week acclaimed cowboy performer and songwriter Mary Kaye spent the morning doing educational outreach at Canyon Elementary School.

With 10 kids of her own, Kaye knows how to enthrall an audience of fifth graders with a genre of music many had never heard before that morning.

Many wonder, well, so what is Western music? Is it similar to Country?

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