avalanche

Utah Avalanche Center

Utah avalanche experts have released a video demonstrating the high risk dangers of recreating in the state's back countries.

The potential for avalanches increases significantly with the lack of snow in our mountains, putting backcountry skiiers at risk
utahavalanchecenter.org

Utah avalanche experts are warning backcountry skiers to be extra cautious due to a thin early season snowpack that is the lowest in four decades.

A weather gauge near the top of Little Cottonwood Canyon east of Salt Lake City shows that fewer than 50 inches of snow had fallen by Jan. 1. That's the lowest total for that date since 1977.

Drew Hardesty, a forecaster with the U.S. Forest Service's Utah Avalanche Center, says the thin early season snow can quickly become weak, sugary-like snow that breaks.

Utah Avalanche Center Issues Avalanche Warning

Jan 4, 2017
Utah Avalanche Center

The Forest Service Utah Avalanche Center in Salt Lake City has issued a backcountry avalanche warning in effect from 1 p.m, Tuesday to 6 a.m. Thursday.

noaa.gov

The Utah Avalanche Center has issued a high avalanche warning for the mountains of norther and central Utah, including the Bear River Range, the Western Uintas, the Wasatch Range, the Manti-Skyline plateau, and the mountains of southeast Idaho. 

The center says that natural and human triggered avalanches are now occurring on many steep slopes at the mid and upper elevations. Avalanches may be triggered by the flats below, and for this reason, the center recommends people to avoid being on or beneath steep mountain slopes.