Access Utah

Dani Hayes / Utah Public Radio


It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is former UPR Program Director and Access Utah host Lee Austin. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of  interviews Lee conducted with writer Gore Vidal and former Utah Poet Laureate Ken Brewer. We’ll also hear a portion of a special broadcast on the history of Capitol Reef National Park. We’ll talk about the history of Access Utah and the public affairs programs that preceded this program. And we’ll invite you to pledge your support to UPR to ensure that Access Utah and all the programming you value continues strong.

Physicist and futurist Michio Kaku says that moving human civilization to the stars, formerly the domain of fiction, is increasingly becoming a scientific possibility–and a necessity.

Nashville, August 1920. Thirty-five states have ratified the Nineteenth Amendment, twelve have rejected or refused to vote, and one last state is needed. It all comes down to Tennessee, the moment of truth for the suffragists, after a seven-decade crusade. The opposing forces include politicians with careers at stake, liquor companies, railroad magnates, and racists who don’t want black women voting. And then there are the “Antis”–women who oppose their own enfranchisement, fearing suffrage will bring about the moral collapse of the nation.

In 2012, photographer Matika Wilbur sold everything in her Seattle apartment and created Project 562, which reflects her commitment to visit, engage with and photograph all 562 plus Native American sovereign territories in the United States. With this project she has traveled hundreds of thousands of miles, many in her RV (which she has nicknamed the “Big Girl”) but also by horseback through the Grand Canyon, by train, plane, and boat and on foot across all 50 states.

Wikimedia Commons

Join us on Monday at 9:00 a.m. for our annual live broadcast from the Utah State Capitol in Salt Lake City on the opening day of the Utah Legislature. Tom Williams will be talking with Governor Gary Herbert and majority and minority leaders from the Utah Senate and House of Representatives. We’ll take questions via email for the governor and legislative leaders. We want to know what’s on your mind as the 2018 Utah Legislature gets down to business.

Seminary co op

David Schwartz, author of “The Last Man Who Knew Everything,” joins us for Wednesday’s Access Utah.

The Salt Lake Tribune

Announcing the actions in Salt Lake City, President Trump has removed some 2 million acres from the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments and split the two monuments into five. Bears Ears was split into two separate areas: Shash Jaa at 129,980 acres and Indian Creek at 71,896 acres. Together the two comprise 201,876 acres, as compared to the 1.35 million acres that President Barack Obama named last December.

From  For forty years, Rick Hammond has raised cattle and crops on his wife’s fifth-generation farm. But as he prepares to hand off the operation to his daughter Meghan and her husband Kyle, their entire way of life is under siege.

Center for American Progress

President Donald Trump will phase out a program that has protected hundreds of thousands of young immigrants brought into the country illegally as children and call for Congress to find a legislative solution to protect the immigrants, sometimes known as “dreamers.”

Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Tuesday called the program known as DACA as an “unconstitutional exercise of authority by the executive branch.”


Quoting CNN: “More than 70% of antibiotics sold in the U.S. are for food production animals, according to the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. The problem is that many experts believe this is an overuse of antibiotics, and they fear significant public health consequences.

In The Evolution of Beauty, Richard O. Prum’s award-winning career as an ornithologist and his lifelong passion for bird-watching come together in a thrilling intellectual adventure. Scientific dogma holds that every detail of an animal’s mating displays—every spot on the peacock’s tail—is an advertisement of its genetic material superiority to potential mates. But thirty years of research and fieldwork around the world led Prum to question this idea.

Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives recently passed the American Health Care Act which, they say, fulfills their promise to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. The bill now moves to the Senate.

Access Utah Our guests will include Jason Stevenson, Education and Communication Director from the Utah Health Policy Project and Boyd Matheson, President of Sutherland Institute.  

We’ll talk about taxes, Medicaid, pre-existing conditions, and much more.

Earth Day on Thursday's Access Utah

Apr 20, 2017

We have established an Access Utah tradition: On or near Earth Day each year we invite Utah writer Stephen Trimble and other guests to talk about the earth, the land, and the environment. Here is Trimble’s suggestion for this year: Why don’t we talk about young people’s responses to the land, especially young people who are writing about the land.

 Initially inspired by his own struggles with conflict, consultant and USU lecturer Clair Canfield is committed to changing the way people think and feel about conflict. He says, “Conflict holds up a mirror to our deepest needs and most cherished hopes and it is the doorway of opportunity for creating the change we want in our lives,” and “It is common to feel trapped and stuck when we experience conflict, but there is a way out!” His recent TEDxUSU talk is titled “The Beauty of Conflict.”