Crossing Borders: A Yearlong Storytelling Project

This UPR original series is a yearlong storytelling project about borders that are crossed to pursue goals or make changes in society. 

New episodes added monthly through June 2018.

The UPR Original Series "Crossing Borders" is a yearlong storytelling project between UPR and the USU Office of Global Engagement - providing services for international students and scholars; and facilitating study abroad opportunities for students and faculty. 

Details found here

Jackson Olsen

A fortitude for finding ways to help educate low income and at risk students in North Carolina forced Jackson Olsen to change course.  While volunteering with Teach For America Jackson went from planning to be an attorney to writing a book about his experiences.

In Tanzania, electricity is not a given, it's a gift.  Norman Harrison has brought this gift from Utah to Tanzania.  He recently returned from installing solar panels at the Falco Children's Village. 

Our Crossing Borders series, crosses the Utah border into Idaho to tell you about the journey of a mother and her transgender son. Through a series of short vignettes, Page Geske and her son Andrew reflect on their relationship through the years as they share about the loss, healing, and freedom they found through their own border crossing—the transition process.

Crossing Borders: With A Headscarf

Dec 14, 2017
Gonca Soyer

 

Many borders come with the physical representations of walls, policies and guards. Other borders are less visible and center around ideas and stereotypes. For some Muslim women, social borders may come from wearing a headscarf.

Crossing Borders: The Journey Of Alaskan Salmon

Dec 7, 2017
Vas Sfinarolakis

Phrases like organic, sustainable, eco-friendly, and farm-to-table have been around for a while. The concept of finding healthy and environmentally friendly ways to eat is becoming more popular. More and more, people want to know where their food is coming from, and the process their food undergoes before arriving on their plate. 

Breeanne Matheson

Facilitated by an International Initiatives Grant through the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, a nine-person research team from Utah State University traveled to Morocco to find their academic objectives spark realizations of global proportions. 

Barnes Family

Eleven-year-old Noah Barnes and his family are traveling across the country in the name of diabetes. But while his mom is driving the family car, Noah and his dad are walking ever mile from southern Florida to Washington State on foot. 

Ross Chambless

If you were suddenly forced to leave your home because of violence and political conflict, what would you bring?  Where would you go? These are a few of the questions that an interactive exhibit by Doctors Without Borders challenged visitors to answer recently in Salt Lake City.  The exhibit’s aim was to help visitors imagine what more than 65 million people are experiencing across the world today.

Karena Angell

Continuing with Utah Public Radio’s original series Crossing Borders, we have a story from journalist and podcast producer Andrea Smardon about an undocumented immigrant who came to the US from Peru as a child. She’s an artist in Salt Lake City, and as she was sketching a new piece, she realized that even as an adult, she is still crossing that border.

Tim Magnuson

“I just finished my 10½ mile run,” gasped Travis Peltier as he struggled to catch his breath in a selfie video recently posted on social media. “I want to announce that I started training for the Top of Utah Marathon. This is my 10-year anniversary of getting orthotics.”

Ka-Voka Jackson

As you float down the Colorado River from Glen Canyon Dam to Lake Mead you may not realize that river right, the north side of the river, is owned and managed by the National Park Service and river left is managed by several groups including the Hualapai and Havasupai Indian nations.

Ross Chambless

Life for a refugee in America is as different as their story of how they came to live in the states. And for one refugee living in Salt Lake City, he feels fortunate enough that he wants to give back. 

In mid-July, refugee and refugee supporters gather in Liberty Park in Salt Lake City. It was World Refugee Day, an event hosted by the Utah Refugee Service and the Department of Workforce Services. UPR contributor Ross Chambless was there and collected stories from those who now live in Utah and how the community is rallying around refugees. 

Latino Leaders Network

Hailing from Salt Lake City, Mickey Ibarra founded the Latino Leaders Network to encourage and support Latino youth in making a difference; in their own lives as well is in the community. 

Raised in foster care as a child, Ibarra went on to a distinguished career in government and politics -- including a position in the Clinton White House.

Ross Chambless

U.S. Immigration Laws are complicated and constantly changing.  What’s more, they can be even harder to keep up with if you don’t speak English.  

As the Trump Administration tightens border security and immigration enforcement, many Spanish-speaking Utah residents are turning to sources they trust for information and advice about immigration law.