All Things Considered

Weekdays 4:00 - 7:00 p.m.
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by more than 11 million people on over 600 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. Andrea Seabrook hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

More information at All Things Considered.

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World
10:11 am
Fri December 28, 2012

Out Of Desperation, North Korean Women Become Breadwinners

Women shop and trade at a market in Razon city, northeast of Pyongyang, in September. Most private trading, which is the only source of income for almost half of North Korean families, is done by women.
Carlos Barria Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 3:06 pm

Imagine going to work every day and not getting paid. Then, one day, you're told there's no work to do β€” so you must pay the company for the privilege of not working.

This is the daily reality facing Mrs. Kim, a petite 52-year-old North Korean. Her husband's job in a state-run steel factory requires him to build roads. She can't remember the last time he received a monthly salary. When there are no roads to build, he has to pay his company around 20 times his paltry monthly salary, she says.

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Remembrances
6:38 pm
Thu December 27, 2012

Schwarzkopf, Commander In Gulf War, Dies At 78

Originally published on Thu December 27, 2012 7:40 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

General Norman Schwarzkopf has died. The military leader who earned the nickname Stormin' Norman was 78 years old. He became a household name in the 1991 Persian Gulf War, commanding the U.S.-led international coalition that drove Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait.

Joining us now is NPR's Pentagon correspondent, Tom Bowman. And, Tom, to begin, tell us a little bit about his background. How did Schwarzkopf rise through the ranks?

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Books
4:56 pm
Thu December 27, 2012

Libraries And E-Lending: The 'Wild West' Of Digital Licensing?

About three-quarters of public libraries offer digital lending, but finding a book you want can be frustrating β€” every publisher has its own set of rules.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu December 27, 2012 7:40 pm

Have you ever borrowed an e-book from a library? If the answer is no, you're a member of a large majority. A survey out Thursday from the Pew Internet Project finds that only 5 percent of "recent library users" have tried to borrow an e-book this year.

About three-quarters of public libraries offer e-books, according to the American Library Association, but finding the book you want to read can be a challenge β€” when it's available at all.

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Books
2:56 pm
Thu December 27, 2012

Margaret Atwood's Brave New World Of Online Publishing

Margaret Atwood has written 13 novels, including The Handmaid's Tale and Oryx and Crake.
George Whiteside

Originally published on Thu December 27, 2012 7:40 pm

If you're a Margaret Atwood fan β€” and you've got some spare change under the couch cushions β€” just a few dollars will get you a stand-alone episode of the new novel she's writing in serial form.

It's called Positron, and Atwood is publishing it on Byliner, a website launched last year that's one of many new sites billing themselves as platforms for writers.

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Books
2:24 pm
Thu December 27, 2012

Change Is The Only Constant In Today's Publishing Industry

Penguin and Random House, two of the biggest players in publishing, announced in October that they would merge.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 27, 2012 7:40 pm

The publishing industry has been in flux for years. First chain stores, then Amazon, then e-books β€” many forces have combined to create dramatic change in the traditional publishing model.

Mike Shatzkin is the founder and CEO of the publishing industry consulting firm Idea Logical. He says one of the biggest changes happening in publishing right now is the planned merger of two of the biggest players in the field, Penguin and Random House β€” with whispers of further mergers to come.

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Books
2:23 pm
Thu December 27, 2012

E-Books Destroying Traditional Publishing? The Story's Not That Simple

Publishers are finding that flexible pricing on e-books can help bring in new readers.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu December 27, 2012 7:40 pm

What counts as a book these days, in a world of Kindles, Nooks and iPads β€” and eager talk about new platforms and distribution methods?

Traditional publishers are traveling a long and confusing road into the digital future. To begin with, here's the conventional wisdom about publishing: E-books are destroying the business model.

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Shots - Health News
2:20 pm
Thu December 27, 2012

Shootings Leave Sandy Hook Survivors Rethinking The Odds

People visit a memorial outside Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., on Dec. 15.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 27, 2012 9:02 pm

About a month ago, Declan Procaccini's 10-year-old son woke him early in the morning in a fright.

"He came into my bedroom and said, 'Dad, I had a horrible, horrible dream!' " Procaccini says. "He was really shaken up. I said, 'Tell me about it,' and he told me he'd had a dream that a teenager came into his classroom at his school and shot all the kids in front of him."

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Europe
1:59 pm
Thu December 27, 2012

Italians In Steel Town Face Stark Choice: Health Or Jobs

ILVA Steel, Europe's biggest steel plant, is located in the Italian port city of Taranto. Judges have ordered a partial shutdown because the plant spews dangerous carcinogens. But the plant is also the anchor of the region's economy, employing some 20,000 people. Sylvia Poggioli

Media
1:59 pm
Thu December 27, 2012

Journalists Thrust Into Heart Of Gun Story

Originally published on Thu December 27, 2012 7:40 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Amid all of the news coverage of the Newtown school shooting, a wrinkle has emerged. The statements and actions of journalists miles away from Connecticut have stirred up controversy.

As we hear from NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik, some journalists have thrust themselves into the middle of the story about guns.

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U.S.
1:31 pm
Thu December 27, 2012

An Abundance Of Extreme Weather Has Many On Edge

A parking lot full of yellow taxis is flooded as a result of Hurricane Sandy on Oct. 30 in Hoboken, N.J.
Charles Sykes AP

Originally published on Thu December 27, 2012 7:40 pm

Opinion polls show 2012's extreme weather β€” producing wildfires, floods and drought β€” has more people making a connection with climate change. For Marti Andrews in southern New Jersey, a turning point was the summer's hurricane-like derecho.

"I don't want to say I freaked out about it, but holy crap, it scared me," she says. It packed winds up to 90 miles per hour and nonstop lightning, which Andrews says looked like some wild disco display in the sky.

"I've never seen anything like that," she says. "I sat there on the couch thinking, 'Oh my God, we're all gonna die!' "

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