Access Utah

Weekdays 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

Access Utah is UPR's original program focusing on the things that matter to Utah. The hour-long show airs daily at 9:00 a.m. and covers everything from pets to politics in a range of formats from in-depth interviews to call-in shows.

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Access Utah
11:14 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Bad Air On Access Utah And Nuclear Testing On Science Questions Friday

Credit earthtimes.org

Logan has some of the worst air in the nation several days many years.  On Friday’s AU, USU Professor of Toxicology, Roger Coulombe, talks to host Sheri Quinn about Cache Valley air and what is being done to help clean it up so we can all breathe a little easier.   

At 9:30 Science Questions explores the downwind effects of nuclear testing in Nevada and Utah in the 1950s and the science of nuclear bombs with one of the nation's first female chemists.   

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Access Utah
10:20 am
Thu October 23, 2014

The Future Of Snow And Skiing On Thursday's Access Utah

Credit grist.org

In 2012, two skiers from Jackson Hole, Wyoming, noticed that snow was disappearing from the western U.S. and wondered how long it would be before it affected the mountains in their backyard. They called Porter Fox, a longtime Powder magazine editor and writer, and asked if he was interested in writing a book about climate change and snow.

In the resulting book, ”DEEP: The Story of Skiing and the Future of Snow” Fox notes that in the last 45 years, 1 million square miles of spring snow cover has disappeared from the Northern Hemisphere. Rocky Mountain spring snowpack is down by 20%, and Europe has lost half of its glacial ice. Winter warming in the U.S. has tripled since 1970, and warming in the European Alps is now three times the global average. By mid-century, climatologists predict that more than half of the Northeast's 103 ski resorts will have to close due to rising temperatures. Two-thirds of Europe's ski resorts will likely no longer be snow-reliable in 50-70 years. The Western U.S. could lose anywhere from 25-100% of its snowpack by 2100, effectively ending skiing at resorts like Park City and relegating ski operations at Aspen to the top quarter of the mountain. And that's just the beginning...

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Access Utah
11:04 am
Wed October 22, 2014

Undercover Child Slavery Rescue On Access Utah Wednesday

Credit voicesofyouth.org

Dallas Hyland, a photojournalist and resident of St. George, recently traveled to Colombia with a privately-funded organization, Operation Underground Railroad, to execute what they called Clear Hope; a mission they say proved to be the biggest child trafficking rescue operation in history.

Hyland says that there are approximately 23-million people worldwide in some form of subjugation, including forced labor, and sex labor. And two million of those are children. He adds that “...at the height of the Trans-Atlantic trade, the slave trade, I believe the numbers were around 17 million. This is alarming because that means we’re not progressing, we’re digressing. ...slavery did not end with the Civil War...It’s getting worse. It’s just underground and nobody talks about it.” 


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Access Utah
11:20 am
Tue October 21, 2014

Clash Of Amendments: Feminism, Free Speech, And Gun Control On Tuesday's Access Utah

Rally for feminism and free speech at Utah State University

It’s been THE topic of conversation at Utah State University for several days now as well as making the pages of the New York Times and the airwaves of NPR: After learning that USU was legally forbidden from restricting firearms at a Wednesday lecture over which she received a death threat, nationally-known feminist writer and video game critic, Anita Sarkeesian, canceled her appearance. (SLTrib) She says she won’t appear at a Utah school until guns are barred from the state’s campuses.

Rep. Curt Oda says she’s overreacting and says that he wants to further strengthen gun rights by reinforcing Utah law allowing open carrying of guns on Utah’s college campuses. Students and faculty gathered Wednesday at USU to promote free speech and condemn threats against Sarkeesian.


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Access Utah
10:31 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Encore Of "Wildrides and Wildflowers: Philosophy and Botany with Bikes" On Monday's Access Utah

Credit mavgetaways.com

On Monday's Access Utah we'll revisit a conversation from March.  

Two Utah Valley University professors who describe themselves as similar to hosts Click and Clack from NPR’s "Car Talk," set out to repeatedly bike the Great Western Trail, observing and writing about its variations with every season. The accounts of their adventures, however, refuse to be limited to flora and fauna.

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Access Utah
10:43 am
Fri October 17, 2014

"The Ancient History Of Oil" And "Youth Addiction Recovery" On Friday's Access Utah

Credit sfari.org

Friday on Access Utah host Sheri Quinn revisits her conversation with former oil executive and geologist Marc Deshowitz about the unique geology of southern Utah parks and the ancient history of oil in the area.    At 9:30 Science Questions presents a special encore program about youth addiction and recovery featuring Utah addiction scientist Glen Hanson and an educational approach gaining popularity across the nation that fosters recover schools. 

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Access Utah
11:18 am
Thu October 16, 2014

Flirting With French On Thursday's Access Utah

Credit amazon.com

William Alexander is more than a Francophile. He wants to be French. There’s one small problem: he doesn’t speak the language. In “Flirting with French: How a Language Charmed Me, Seduced Me, and Nearly Broke My Heart” Alexander sets out to conquer the language he loves. But will it love him back?

Alexander eats, breathes, and sleeps French (even conjugating in his dreams). He travels to France, where mistranslations send him bicycling off in all sorts of wrong directions, and he nearly drowns in an immersion class in Provence. While playing hooky from grammar lessons and memory techniques, Alexander reports on the Académie française, the four-hundred-year-old institution charged with keeping the language pure; explores the science of human communication, learning why it’s harder for fifty-year-olds to learn a second language than it is for five-year-olds; and, frustrated with his progress, explores an IBM research lab, where he trades barbs with a futuristic hand-held translator. Does he succeed in becoming fluent?  Alexander is surprised to discover that studying French may have had a far greater impact on his life than actually learning to speak it ever would.

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Access Utah
10:50 am
Wed October 15, 2014

"The Glass Cage: Automation And Us" Author Nicholas Carr On Wednesday's Access Utah

Credit amazon.com

Technological advances seem to be accelerating. Every day we hear of something new: self-driving cars, wearable computers, factory robots, digitized medicine… Continuing advances in computers and automation can reduce workloads, increase productivity, and even imbue life with a sense of wonder. But Nicholas Carr, in his new book, “The Glass Cage: Automation and Us,” says there are hidden costs in granting software dominion over our work and leisure. Even as these programs bring ease to our lives, he says, they are stealing something essential from us.

Drawing on psychological and neurological studies that underscore how tightly people’s happiness and satisfaction are tied to performing hard work in the real world, Carr reveals something we already suspect: shifting our attention to computer screens can leave us disengaged and discontented. From nineteenth-century textile mills to the cockpits of modern jets, from the frozen hunting grounds of Inuit tribes to the sterile landscapes of GPS maps, “The Glass Cage” examines the personal as well as the economic consequences of our growing dependence on computers.

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Access Utah
11:03 am
Tue October 14, 2014

Encore Of "World's Strongest Librarian" On Tuesday's Access Utah

Author Josh Hanagarne
Credit sltrib.com

Tuesday we’ll revisit this conversation from May:

Josh Hanagarne couldn't be invisible if he tried. Although he wouldn't officially be diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome until his freshman year of high school, Josh was six years old and onstage in a school Thanksgiving play when he first began exhibiting symptoms.

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By the time he was twenty, the young Mormon had reached his towering adult height of 6'7" when — while serving on a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints — his Tourette's tics escalated to nightmarish levels. Determined to conquer his affliction, Josh underwent everything from quack remedies to lethargy-inducing drug regimes to Botox injections that paralyzed his vocal cords and left him voiceless for three years. Undeterred, Josh persevered to marry and earn a degree in Library Science. At last, an eccentric, autistic strongman — and former Air Force Tech Sergeant and guard at an Iraqi prison — taught Josh how to "throttle" his tics into submission through strength-training.

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Access Utah
10:32 am
Thu October 9, 2014

Lt. General Honore on Thursday's Access Utah

Credit teamrubiconusa.org

Russell Honore came to national attention when, as a U.S. Army Lt. General, he was assigned to lead the Department of Defense’s Joint Task-Force Katrina. The hurricane hit on Monday, August 29, 2005, and he was put in charge of overseeing the federal emergency response on Tuesday at 10:00 p.m. By the time he arrived on Wednesday morning thousands of people were stranded on roof tops and in attics and more than 16,000 people were at the Superdome along with a similar number at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, according to Honore.

General Honore gained a reputation as a straight-talking no-nonsense leader who got things done and was called the”Category 5 General” and that “John Wayne dude.” He served 37 years in the military and supported the Department of Defense’s response to several hurricanes including Hurricane Floyd in 1999 and Lili in 2002. Now retired from the army, he says his current mission is to help build a culture of preparedness in families and communities. His books include “Leadership in the New Normal” and “Survival: How Being Prepared Can Keep You and Your Family Safe.” He is currently a senior scientist with The Gallup Organization, where he is working on developing questions to determine levels of preparedness. He is also an active public speaker and regular contributor to CNN where he is often interviewed on topics related to disaster preparedness.

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