Tom Williams

Program Director | Access Utah Host

Tom Williams worked as a part-time UPR announcer for a few years and joined Utah Public Radio full-time in 1996.  He is a proud graduate of Uintah High School in Vernal and Utah State University (B. A. in Liberal Arts and Master of Business Administration.)  He grew up in a family that regularly discussed everything from opera to religion to politics. He is interested in just about everything and loves to engage people in conversation, so you could say he has found the perfect job as host “Access Utah” and “Opera Saturday.”  He and his wife Becky, live in Logan.

Ways to Connect

adlibbing.org

We have established an Access Utah tradition: On or near Earth Day each year we invite Utah writer Stephen Trimble and other guests to talk about the earth, the land, and the environment. Trimble suggested we focus on the Torrey House Press this year and specifically focus on their blog which is full of powerful posts written by young authors who are passionate about our beautiful planet.

USU Caine College of the Arts

Wednesday’s Access Utah is a part of USU’s Year of the Arts. We’ll talk about Henry Purcell’s  opera “Dido and Aeneas,” and related topics. Our guests will include conductor Nicholas Kraemer and Purcell scholar and Syracuse University professor Amanda Eubanks Winkler. And we’ll hear some music from the opera.

 

Utah State University Opera is presenting the opera “Dido and Aeneas” on April 19 and 20 at 7:30 p.m. and April 21 at 2 p.m. in the Morgan Theatre on the USU Logan campus.

The War on Loneliness

When Graham Cavanaugh divorced his first wife it was to marry his girlfriend, Audra, a woman as irrepressible as she is spontaneous and fun. But, Graham learns, life with Audra can also be exhausting, constantly interrupted by chatty phone calls, picky-eater houseguests, and invitations to weddings of people he’s never met.

Michael Lionstar

Edward Hirsch is the celebrated author of nine books of poetry.

upr.org

Utah Patients Coalition, which is leading a ballot initiative campaign in support of medical marijuana, says that “right now, Utah patients battling cancer, seizures, and other life-threatening conditions must break the law in order to relieve their pain and suffering.

Amazon.com

David Roberts has spent his career documenting voyages to the most extreme landscapes on earth. In his new book, “Limits of the Known,” he reflects on humanity’s—and his own—relationship to extreme risk; and he tries to make sense of why so many have committed their lives to the pursuit of adventure.

CNN.com

Some 200 years after her death, Jane Austen's books are still widely read and loved. Many film adaptations and spin-offs such as 'Pride, Prejudice and Zombies' are also adored by many. The BBC said this about Austen.

"Jane Austen died in 1817, when she was just 41. But in her short life, she exerted more of a lasting influence on British literature and culture than many of her peers who lived twice as long.

wikicommons

Fifty years after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., just one in 10 African Americans think the United States has achieved all or most of the goals of the civil rights movement. That’s according to a recent poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. On Wednesday’s Access Utah, on the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s death, we’ll talk about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., his legacy, and the future of the ideals he so eloquently articulated and strove for.

USA Today

Last week USU’s Department of Languages Philosophy and Speech Communications hosted a panel discussion titled “Meaning and #MeToo.” Panelists discussed the #MeToo movement and provided historical, cultural, and legal analysis. On Tuesday’s Access Utah we’ll continue the discussion with the panelists: Erica Holberg, USU Assistant Professor of Philosophy; Mattie Burkert, USU Assistant Professor of English; and Nicole Vouvalis, Director of USU’s Institutional Review Board Office.

AL.com

This episode of Access Utah is part of the “Democracy and the Informed Citizen” Initiative administered by the Federation of State Humanities Councils in partnership with the Pulitzer Prizes Board for a collaboration between UPR, Utah Humanities, and The Salt Lake City Library. The initiative seeks to deepen the public’s knowledge and appreciation of the vital connections between democracy, the humanities, journalism, and an informed citizenry. The initiative is supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

 

UPR

It’s the final pledge drive special edition of Access Utah for our Spring drive today. My special guests this hour are some of the great people who have served as student interns and producers of Access Utah. We’ll be talking with Dani Hayes, Adison Pace, Katie Swain, Bennett Purser, Aimee Cobabe and Connor Rivers. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our most memorable episodes. We’ll revisit discussions about lifting the ban on gay Boy Scouts, and about Sex Positivity. And we’ll hear some music from our program on the history of the Banjo.

City Weekly

It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is Ken Sanders from Ken Sanders Rare Books in Salt Lake City. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of our favorite episodes of the program.

TEDX USU

It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is folklorist and USU Assistant Professor of English Lynne McNeill. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some great episodes of the program.

Radioline

It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is former UPR Station Manager Richard Meng. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of some of my most memorable interviews. We’ll hear from explorer and educator Helen Thayer; indomitable Holocaust survivor Eva Kor; and singer-songwriter Rosalie Sorrells.

Dani Hayes / Utah Public Radio

 


It’s a pledge drive special edition of Access Utah today. My special guest for the hour is former UPR Program Director and Access Utah host Lee Austin. We’ll reach into the archives for parts of  interviews Lee conducted with writer Gore Vidal and former Utah Poet Laureate Ken Brewer. We’ll also hear a portion of a special broadcast on the history of Capitol Reef National Park. We’ll talk about the history of Access Utah and the public affairs programs that preceded this program. And we’ll invite you to pledge your support to UPR to ensure that Access Utah and all the programming you value continues strong.

helenwhitney.com

We don’t know how. We don’t know when. But death comes for us all. 

mkaku.org

Physicist and futurist Michio Kaku says that moving human civilization to the stars, formerly the domain of fiction, is increasingly becoming a scientific possibility–and a necessity.

Penguin Random House

Dr. Anne Spoerry treated hundreds of thousands of people across rural Kenya over the span of fifty years. A member of the renowned Flying Doctors Service, the French-born Spoerry learned how to fly a plane at the age of forty-five and earned herself the cherished nickname, "Mama Daktari"--"Mother Doctor"--from the people of Kenya. Yet few knew what drove her from post-World War II Europe to Africa. Now, in the first comprehensive account of her life, Dr.

Weller Book Works

Patty Rayman was born with the ability to communicate with animals and has helped thousands of people resolve many types of behavior, health, attitude and relationship issues with their animal companions. In working with all types of animals, she has developed techniques to help people move from conflict to cooperation in their relationships.

Wikimedia Commons

One month after seventeen people were killed in the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, Women’s March Youth Empower is organizing a national student walkout against gun violence. In most areas, including Utah, the walkout will happen at 10:00 a.m.local time on Wednesday, March 14.

University Press Of Mississippi

Joseph Ward, Dean of the USU College of Humanities and Social Sciences, is the editor of a new book titled “European Empires in the American South: Colonial and Environmental Encounters,” which examines the process of European expansion into a region that has come to be known as the American South. After Europeans began to cross the Atlantic with confidence, they interacted for three hundred years with one another, with the native people of the region, and with enslaved Africans in ways that made the South a significant arena of imperial ambition.

Amazon.com

Part elegy, part ode, part investigative science journalism, Jonathan Thompson’s new book “River of Lost Souls: The Science, Politics, and Greed Behind the Gold King Mine Disaster” (Torrey House Press), tells the gripping story behind the 2015 Gold King Mine disaster that turned the Animas River in southwestern Colorado orange with sludge and toxic metals for more than 100 miles downstream, wreaking havoc on cities, farms, and the Navajo Nation along the way.

elaineweiss.com

Nashville, August 1920. Thirty-five states have ratified the Nineteenth Amendment, twelve have rejected or refused to vote, and one last state is needed. It all comes down to Tennessee, the moment of truth for the suffragists, after a seven-decade crusade. The opposing forces include politicians with careers at stake, liquor companies, railroad magnates, and racists who don’t want black women voting. And then there are the “Antis”–women who oppose their own enfranchisement, fearing suffrage will bring about the moral collapse of the nation.

 

The Curies' newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War.

 

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