Around the Nation
2:00 am
Thu February 16, 2012

Iowa Honors China's Xi Jinping With Gala Dinner

Originally published on Thu February 16, 2012 8:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

China's Vice President Xi Jinping is hitting all the hotspots on his American tour. He's already been to Washington, D.C. and to the White House. Later today, he heads to Los Angeles. And, of course, yesterday he was in Iowa. He has a personal connection to that state, and Iowa farmers now have reason to be glad he does.

Iowa Public Radio's Sandhya Dirks reports.

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Asia
2:00 am
Thu February 16, 2012

Thailand Squeezed In Iran-Israel Shadow War

Originally published on Sun February 19, 2012 6:47 am

Thailand says three Iranians arrested this week were planning to assassinate Israeli diplomats in Bangkok. The bombs went off on Tuesday, wounding one Iranian and four Thai residents. Since then, Israel and Iran have been trading accusations of waging shadow warfare against each other through a series of recent attempted assassinations in several countries.

Business
2:00 am
Thu February 16, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu February 16, 2012 8:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Today's last word in business is: snap, crackle and crunch.

Kellogg, the name behind many boxes in the cereal aisle, will now have its name on cans of Pringles. Kellogg bought the potato chip brand from Proctor and Gamble yesterday for $2.7 billion. The company put down the big bucks for Pringles to capitalize on yet another growing consumer demand in places like China and India - a new taste for snack.

And that's the business news from MORNING EDITION on NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Business
2:00 am
Thu February 16, 2012

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

NPR Story
2:00 am
Thu February 16, 2012

Frustrations Mount As Greece Waits For Economic Lifeline

Originally published on Thu February 16, 2012 8:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

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Chris Lehman graduated from Temple University with a journalism degree in 1997. He landed his first job less than a month later, producing arts stories for Red River Public Radio in Shreveport, Louisiana. Three years later he headed north to DeKalb, Illinois, where he worked as a reporter and announcer for NPR–affiliate WNIJ–FM. In 2006 he headed west to become the Salem Correspondent for the Northwest News Network.

Chris is a native of rural Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He was born in the upstairs bedroom of his grandmother's house, and grew up in a 230 year old log cabin in the woods. Chris traces his interest in journalism to his childhood, when his parents threatened to take away his newspaper if he didn’t do his chores.

Election 2012
10:01 pm
Wed February 15, 2012

How Does Mitt Romney Stop Rick Santorum's Rise?

Rick Santorum gestures toward Republican rival Mitt Romney during the South Carolina GOP presidential debate in Myrtle Beach on Jan. 16.
Charles Dharapak AFP/Getty Images

What's the best way for Mitt Romney to stop Rick Santorum?

For the answer, we went to someone who has done it before.

Democratic strategist Saul Shorr helped Bob Casey defeat then-Sen. Santorum, R-Pa., in a landslide in 2006. Santorum lost by 18 points.

But Shorr says that was a general election; in a Republican primary, Romney will have a much harder job.

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Medical Treatments
10:01 pm
Wed February 15, 2012

Military Pokes Holes In Acupuncture Skeptics' Theory

iStockphoto.com

In a fluorescent-lit exam room, Col. Rochelle Wasserman sticks ballpoint-size pins in the ears of Sgt. Rick Remalia.

Remalia broke his back, hip and pelvis during a rollover caused by a pair of rocket-propelled grenades in Afghanistan. He still walks with a cane and suffers from mild traumatic brain injury. Pain is an everyday occurrence, which is where the needles come in.

"I've had a lot of treatment, and this is the first treatment that I've had where I've been like, OK, wow, I've actually seen a really big difference," he says.

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Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Wed February 15, 2012

BP's Oil Slick Set To Spill Into Courtroom

Docks on the Bon Secour River sit idle nearly two years after the BP oil spill. The small fishing village of Bon Secour, Ala., is still suffering the lingering effects of the spill, despite government monitoring and assurances that Gulf seafood is not contaminated.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Thu February 16, 2012 8:53 am

A federal court in New Orleans is preparing for one of the largest and most complex environmental lawsuits ever to come to court. It stems from the worst oil disaster in U.S. history: the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon rig nearly two years ago and the resulting oil gusher in the Gulf of Mexico.

Testimony is scheduled to begin at the end of the month. The case combines more than 500 lawsuits in one proceeding designed to determine who's responsible for what went wrong.

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Law
10:01 pm
Wed February 15, 2012

Age Discrimination Suits Jump, But Wins Are Elusive

Jack Gross filed an age discrimination suit against his employer when he was demoted in 2003. He lost his case at the U.S. Supreme Court.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 16, 2012 8:53 am

For older Americans looking for work, finding a job can be a tremendous challenge. Someone 55 or older will typically take three months longer to find employment than the average job seeker.

And with more people of all ages looking for work in the slow economy, age discrimination complaints are on the rise — but becoming harder to win.

Employment law experts say that has a lot to do with one particular case: Gross v. FBL Financial Services Inc.

'Persona Non Grata'

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