Wild About Utah

Riparian Zones on Wild About Utah

Jun 22, 2018
como.gov

Summer’s heat has turned on. It was evident in a dramatic fashion as I ran a ridge in N. Utah where the early am temps were near 70 degrees, flowers had faded, and the absence of birdsong. 

Shiras Moost Calf
Sam Robertson


In the early 1900s, moose began expanding south into Utah from Wyoming.  

 

This moose sub-species was named in honor of [Congressman] George Shiras III who explored Yellowstone in the early 1900’s and found large numbers of moose.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife

As human populations increase and construction developments overtake agricultural land and wildlife habitat, some people may feel as if there is little hope for local connections to nature.  Don’t raise the white flag of surrender.  There is much you can do in your own yards to help attract wild songbirds and butterflies.

Hidden In Plain Sight on Wild About Utah

May 18, 2018
USDA

My wife and I paddled our kayak gingerly into the eaves of a limestone cliff, our eyes scanning its face for some sort of concavity or movement where there was none. “I don’t see where she could possibly be,” my wife confessed. She was right. We knew we had found the right rock, soiled as it was with bird refuse, but there was nowhere for the nest to lie it seemed. 

Spring’s Gifts on Wild About Utah

May 4, 2018
Glacier lily
US Forest Service

I doubt there was a song left unsung as I worked my way up Birch Canyon early am. Testosterone laden birds filled the morning with delight. Robins, finches, meadowlarks, song sparrows- what a marvelous symphony! I breathed deeply to fully absorb air filled with titillating odors from last night’s gentle spring rain- nature’s perfume, free and priceless.

Poetry In The Forest on Wild About Utah

Apr 25, 2018
poetry in the forest
edsitement.neh.gov

There are people who can capture beautiful scenery by painting on canvas, using film photography, and with digital technology.  And these forms of art can be visually stunning.  But there is a unique perspective of visualizing when written words are read, allowing one’s mind to see not only the exterior of a scene but the interior heart intended by the writer.

The Invasive Phragmites on Wild About Utah

Apr 20, 2018
Great Salt Lake Phragmites
Karin Kettenring

Those unfamiliar with the history of the Utah’s wetlands may see Phragmites and say, “What a beautiful, elegant plant! It looks so graceful blowing along the shore.”

However, the plant’s attractiveness and ability to absorb pollutants may not compensate for its negative impacts.

'Wilderglyphs' on Wild About Utah

Apr 4, 2018
Ice Pattern Wilderglyph
Josh Boling

Glyph: a word that might evoke images in the mind of ancient Egyptian pictures recounting the trials and triumphs of pharaohs and their people; or Native American rock art meaningfully pecked into a sandstone wall, directing desert travelers toward water. There are others, too, all around us, hiding in plain sight. They are perhaps less noticed because they are not made by humans, but instead by the elements and the wilds. I call them wilderglyphs.

Bonneville Cutthroat Trout
Shauna Leavitt

In the 1970s, many feared Utah’s native fish, the Bonneville Cutthroat Trout, was extinct.

A search began and in a short time, with a sigh of relief, state managers were able to report the Bonneville cutthroat trout was still in Utah’s rivers and streams, but the sub-species was imperiled and had experienced dramatic reductions in abundance and distribution rangewide.

State Symbols on Wild About Utah

Mar 13, 2018
Topaz gemstone
US Geological Survey

Most people could probably name the state bird or the state tree, but what about the state gem? The state grass? State fruit?  Do you know why they are important to Utah?  Here are just a few of Utah’s State Symbols that you might not have known.

'Journey North' on Wild About Utah

Mar 2, 2018
Citizen-scientist in yard
USGS

To those who take personal pride in their yard, park, field, or community you could become part of an amazing network called Journey North.  This is a free, extremely easy Citizen-Science online activity that people can simply enjoy, or enter data about their own backyard and join over 80,000 other people and schools that participate regularly.

The Language Of Ravens on Wild About Utah

Feb 23, 2018
The Common Raven
National Parks Service

I was three days downriver and hadn’t seen a soul since shoving my canoe away from the boat ramp outside of town. The only sounds accompanying my solitude were the white noise of rapid water and the echoes of thoughts pin-balling around my mind—that is, until the third morning when, stooped over the small, blue roar of my cook stove, I was startled by an unfamiliar sound. 

Our Winterless Winter on Wild About Utah

Feb 20, 2018
NOAA

Our winterless winter. I’ve been in this lovely valley over 30 years and have never experienced such a balmy January, and now February. The thaw began January first and never ended. As an avid cross country skier, I fear my days of low elevation skiing have ended over a month early.

Soundscapes on Wild About Utah

Feb 9, 2018
National Parks Service

Imagine yourself in your favorite place outside.  What sounds do you expect to hear?  The sound of water rushing over rocks? Crickets chirping? The wind softly blowing through the trees?  These are some of the natural sounds you might expect to hear, but it might not always work out that way.  

Utah Envirothon on Wild About Utah

Feb 2, 2018
Ron Hellstern

No matter where you live in the State of Utah, you are located in one of the 38 Conservation Districts managed by the Utah Conservation Commission. Each of those Districts sponsor and support a wonderful program for High School students called the Utah Envirothon (which simply means a marathon competition to understand Utah’s environments).

South Canyon Sage-Grouse on Wild About Utah

Jan 26, 2018
Nicki Frey

At 3:00 a.m. on a frigid winter morning Nicki Frey, an extension associate professor in the Department of Wildland Resources at USU, leads a group of new biologists who are trapping west of Bryce Canyon. 

PEHart via Visual hunt / CC BY-SA

Last Saturday 3 intrepid young families joined us for a morning with the Stokes Nature Center slipping and sliding along a canyon trail to discover animal and plant adaptations to survive the winter. 

Classroom In The Sky on Wild About Utah

Jan 12, 2018
Eric Newell

Edith Bowen third graders recently had the opportunity to visit the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in Brigham City. The day was chock full of exciting activities meant to engage students’ senses and ground their understanding of core curriculum within the context of the place we were visiting. It was awareness we were after, using the semi-wild freshwater wetlands as a wellspring of imagination and thought.

Utah's Dark Skies on Wild About Utah

Jan 5, 2018
nps.gov

The night sky...throughout history humans have looked up after the sun set in the evening and marveled at the astral bodies spread above them in a sea of black. This sight has inspired people from every age of history and from every culture around the world.

Audubon.org

On December 19th, I will have joined several others for an exciting day of counting bird species and numbers in our lovely, snowy valley. Our numbers will be entered on a database that will be shared with the world. 

13 Tips For Winter Bird Feeding on Wild About Utah

Dec 8, 2017
Ron Hellstern

Most people enjoy watching birds, except for their occasional deposits on cars or windows.  In an earlier program, I mentioned at least fifteen benefits that birds provide to humans and planet Earth.  But as human population and developments increase, the survival of many bird species becomes threatened.  

Talking Dirt on Wild About Utah

Dec 1, 2017
sunnyvale.ca.gov

It’s time to talk dirt- and I’m not talking politics, but real, factual dirt! Of all our amazing planets ecosystems, there is one that rises above all others. It’s the one your home is standing on, the one you don’t want your kids to track in the house. By now you’ve probably guessed it!

Farewell Autumn on Wild About Utah

Nov 14, 2017
US Forest Service

Many people enjoy Autumn as their favorite season of the year. Temperatures are comfortable, most pesky insects are absent, animal migrations are evident, and beautiful Fall colors on the trees and shrubs are stunning. But why do these deciduous plants change color? Consider daylight, temperature, and chemistry.

The Urban Ecotone on Wild About Utah

Nov 14, 2017
blogs.va.gov

A small herd of deer bounded away over the manicured grounds of the Logan Cemetery, tumbled through its faux wrought-iron gateway, and hurdled across empty campus streets. I watched the deer disappear into alleyways between ocher-bricked University buildings, contemplating their explosion of wild life as my city woke to a quiet dawn.

Bryan Maloney

Along the bottom of the Weber River lives a genetically-distinct fish called the bluehead sucker. 

Its head is colored in dusty shades of blue, brown and gold.  From the gills to the tail the fish has a pattern of gold, diamond-shaped scales with dark brown borders, which grow larger and more distinct closer to the tail.

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