Wild About Utah

Farewell Autumn on Wild About Utah

Nov 14, 2017
US Forest Service

Many people enjoy Autumn as their favorite season of the year. Temperatures are comfortable, most pesky insects are absent, animal migrations are evident, and beautiful Fall colors on the trees and shrubs are stunning. But why do these deciduous plants change color? Consider daylight, temperature, and chemistry.

The Urban Ecotone on Wild About Utah

Nov 14, 2017
blogs.va.gov

A small herd of deer bounded away over the manicured grounds of the Logan Cemetery, tumbled through its faux wrought-iron gateway, and hurdled across empty campus streets. I watched the deer disappear into alleyways between ocher-bricked University buildings, contemplating their explosion of wild life as my city woke to a quiet dawn.

Bryan Maloney

Along the bottom of the Weber River lives a genetically-distinct fish called the bluehead sucker. 

Its head is colored in dusty shades of blue, brown and gold.  From the gills to the tail the fish has a pattern of gold, diamond-shaped scales with dark brown borders, which grow larger and more distinct closer to the tail.

Third Graders & Kokanee Salmon on Wild About Utah

Oct 13, 2017

It’s a cool crisp morning as my Edith Bowen third graders disembark their mini buses at Cinnamon Creek Campground and sprint for the water’s edge. We’re here to witness an animalian rite of passage as old as evolutionary time: the Salmon Run.

Bird Brains on Wild About Utah

Sep 7, 2017
Naitonal Science Foundation

When I was a young lad being called “bird brain” was an indication that one was lacking in mental capacity.

Over the years I’ve come to question this connotation, and might even consider it a compliment. I suggest that quantity of this gray matter might be outweighed by quality.

Jereme Gaeta

In Bear Lake, there lives a small, bright blue eyed, bottom-dwelling fish species that may appear insignificant as it moves among the lake’s cobble areas.

The Zion Narrows on Wild About Utah

Sep 1, 2017
Department of Interior

Seventeen miles, and three potential swims. If those two descriptors aren’t deterrents, great scenery awaits those who hike the Zion Narrows from the top down into the main canyon. 

Josh Boling

It took all of Frank Clark’s seven steel-ball cartridges to bring down Old Ephraim, the infamous Grizzly Bear that, for many years in the early 20th century, plagued the shepherds of the Northern Wasatch Mountains. 

Mayfly Life Cycle on Wild About Utah

Jul 10, 2017
VisualHunt.com

It’s commonly believed that mayflies live for only one day. If you visit a cold, clear river in the spring or early summer, you might see what is known as a “mayfly hatch,” when millions of delicate, glassy insects suddenly appear on the surface of the water, take to the air, and then fall into the river later that day and apparently drown.

June Fireflies on Wild About Utah

Jun 23, 2017
nature.mdc.mo.gov

Most people are fascinated by unusual displays of light.  Meteor showers, solar eclipses, and the stunning Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights, are grandiose in scale and mesmerize onlookers.  But people are also enchanted with the small life-forms that create their own light.

Greater Sage-Grouse In Utah on Wild About Utah

Jun 16, 2017
Todd Black

Utah’s dry, sagebrush covered landscapes are home to one of North American’s largest grouse species, commonly known as the greater sage-grouse.

Conserving Water on Wild About Utah

Jun 9, 2017

Liquid water is essential to life as we know it on planet Earth.  With rising temperatures ahead, our water resources are critical to us all.  Whether nations contain hot-desert areas or not, the appropriate management of water is essential.  In fact, life-sustaining water is literally far more important and valuable than oil.  

Utah State University Special Collections and Archives.

 

If you’ve ever hiked or driven up Green Canyon near the City of North Logan, you’ve probably noticed the dried-up streambed. It wasn’t always dry, however. In fact, if you turn back the pages of history you’ll find water, and the story of why the stream no longer flows.

Water-Liquid Life on Wild About Utah

May 26, 2017
Cottonwoods Heights City

It’s springtime in the Rockies, and Utah’s northern rivers are engorged with liquid life - and have been for what seems like months now. After a winter of record snowfall, the spring heat and a miniature monsoon season have raised our local waters to levels not seen in decades. 

Bird Benefits on Wild About Utah

May 10, 2017
Ron Hellstern

Birds may not be as exciting as certain athletic events or blockbuster films, but have you ever considered the many benefits they provide to ecosystems and humans? They control insect and rodent populations; they eat weed seeds; they pollinate crops, flowers, fruits. They are a major food source, consider chickens, turkeys, game birds, water fowl, as well as their eggs. 

US FWS, Steve Hillebrand

Beginning as early as the 17th century, beavers have struggled to find safe places to build their homes. Initially, hunters trapped beaver extensively to keep up with the popular beaver fashions in Europe.Then as settlers began moving west, they considered the beavers annoying because of their tendency to cause flooding and damage trees – so the trapping continued.

The Passion Of Penstemaniacs on Wild About Utah

Mar 10, 2017
Dr. Tom Edwards

Penstemaniacs, the name affectionately given to members of the American Penstemon Society, will be gathering from all parts of the world to meet in Vernal, Utah, this June. 

While here, they'll be searching the Uinta Mountains for penstemons native to that area.    

Tree Talk on Wild About Utah

Mar 3, 2017
NYC Parks

The next time you take a walk in the deep woods or even a stroll through a local park, listen closely. You may hear the trees ‘whispering in the wind.’ We use this familiar phrase to describe the soothing sounds of a gentle breeze through the forest canopy; but it may delight and surprise many to know that this figure of speech is now a proven scientific fact. The trees are talking.

Wild Roots on Wild About Utah

Feb 24, 2017
plants.usda.gov

One thing I love about being a horticulturist is paying close attention and working with seasonal cycles, especially this time of year when it finally feel OK to slow down.  This is the time of year when plants put all their energy into reserve for the winter and I think this is really cool.  If you’ve never thought about it, or even if you have… imagine how vibrant the fresh, new, green leaves are in the spring, busting from the dormant branches of trees. 

Why Dippers Dip on Wild About Utah

Feb 10, 2017

Cinclus mexicanus is the only aquatic songbird found in North America, but it goes by several names—the American dipper, the water dipper, or the water ouzel. It is a grapefruit-sized bird that inhabits mountainous riparian areas. It has brownish gray plumage, stubby wings and tail, and ornithologists sometimes refer to it as “stocky,” “chunky,” and even “chubby-looking.” However, the dipper has no shortage of energy, and can be seen careening at low altitudes over mountain streambeds and crashing beak-first into fast-flowing water, always in the upstream direction.

Utah's Fish Culture on Wild About Utah

Feb 3, 2017
digitalmedia.fws.gov

On May 12, 1871, Albert Perry Rockwood, the recently appointed Territorial Fish Superintendent of Utah, arrived at Silver Creek, a small tributary of the Weber River near present-day Rockport Reservoir. After setting up camp, Rockwood went to work catching native Bonneville cutthroat trout, which he placed in crates and milk cartons and loaded on wagons bound for Salt Lake City. 

Orphaned Cub Rehabilitation on Wild About Utah

Jan 26, 2017
www.aphis.usda.gov

Sadly each year, there are orphaned bear cubs in Utah.  Some lose their mothers to forest fires, while others are orphaned by vehicle-bear collisions or other human-related conflicts.

USDA Forest Service

Pando, a sprawling aspen colony and the world’s largest discovered organism, is dying.

On the lip of Fish Lake in Central Utah, Pando germinated from a seed the size of a grain of sand thousands of years ago. Now he sprawls over a hundred acres with approximately 47,000 trunks. 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

On December 17th, I will join several others for an exciting day of counting bird species and numbers in our lovely, snowy valley. The numbers will be entered on a database that will be shared globally.

Chadd VanZanten

Northern Utah’s Logan River is known for its solitude and grandeur. Drive just a few miles up Logan Canyon in Cache Valley and find yourself in a wild setting on the bank of a picturesque mountain stream. It would be difficult to find a place in Utah that is more accessible and yet so peaceful.

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