Vote Utah

utahdemocrats.org

On the ballot this election cycle in Utah is a proposal that would affect appointments to the State Tax Commission. The amendment, if passed, would allow the legislature to select commission members without regard to the candidate’s political affiliation. The commission would become anything but nonpartisan if voters choose to support the amendment, said Peter Corroon, the state Democratic Party chairman.

“The reality will be that it will become entirely partisan and Democrats will have no voice on the Tax Commission,” he said.

The polls continue to swing in the Mia Love-Doug Owens Fourth Congressional District Race. Earlier this week a poll from BYU showed Owens, a Democrat, creeping ahead, but now a new poll shows that Republican Love is the one in the lead.

The poll from Utahpolicy.com gives Love a five percent lead over Owens, with 48 percent and 43 percent of the vote, respectively. However, the margin of error for the survey is also five percent, meaning it is likely no one will know who the next representative to congress will be until election night. The gap between the candidates is narrowing, however; the last poll from Utahpolicy.com had Love leading by nine percent.

According to the most recent poll, one-third of respondents have already cast their ballots for the election.

akronohio.gov

The next open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act begins Nov. 15. While the ACA has come under criticism for having high premiums, Jason Stevenson with the Utah Health Policy Project says there are many government subsidies that can cover the majority of the premium cost.

“Sixty to 70 percent of Americans have no idea that financial help is available if you go to Healthcare.gov to shop for insurance,” Stevenson said. “Once they find that out, they're amazed, and they quickly sign up. But too many people don't know that insurance is now affordable and within their reach through the Affordable Care Act."

Democratic Party of Utah

About half of Utah's state Senate and the entire House are up for election this year, and the Democratic Party has high hopes for increasing representation in the traditionally red state.

“I think we’re in great shape. I think Democrats are mobilized and engaged, I don’t think the Republicans really have a whole lot to vote for, and I think that that’s going to make a difference and we’re going to win in November,” said Matt Lyon, executive director of the Utah Democratic Party.

Utah Democratic Party chairman Peter Corroon said this week that his party has a chance to win seats in Carbon, Emery and Weber Counties.

Voter ID Laws: Where Utah Stands

Oct 24, 2014

Voter identification laws have made national news recently with various courts striking down laws in Wisconsin, Arkansas and Pennsylvania. Utah State University political science Professor Roger Tew said the fight over voter ID laws is complicated and often partisan.

“The argument is that voter IDs are relatively simple. We have to provide IDs for all kinds of things, it should be no different,” Tew said.  “Those who tend to be opposed to it on the other hand, the argument is there are people living in cities and older people who don’t have a need for a driver’s license, or a need to obtain normal IDs that often other people use.”

tex4mayor.com

According to the most recent Gallup Poll, just 14 percent of voters approve of how congress is handling its job, but that hasn’t stopped 14 new candidates from throwing their bones in the ring. 

The first ever election for canine mayor of Salt Lake County is underway, with caninedates running to raise money for the Salt Lake County Animal Services Injured Animals Fund.

Incumbent Curt Webb, and challenger Jeff Turley sit next to each other at the debate for Utah House of Representatives District 5.
http://www.hjnews.com

Candidates contesting the Utah House of Representatives District 5 seat squared off Wednesday night in the Logan Library’s Jim Bridger Room.

Incumbent Curt Webb and challenger Jeff Turley sparred over the funding of education, taxes and public lands, among other things.

 


attorney general cadidates
ABC

The Utah Debate Commission sponsored the first debate between the Republican and Democratic Candidates for Utah Attorney General Wednesday night. Both candidates agreed on many issues, with the exception being over a plan to defend Utah's gay marriage ban.

Wednesday night UPR and the Herald Journal team up with the Logan Library to host two debates between local candidates.

Utah House of Representatives candidates Curt Webb and Jeffrey Turley debate at 7 p.m. (Listen below)

Cache County Attorney candidates James Swink and Chris Daines debate at 8 p.m.

You can listen to the debates live on the Herald Journal's Website, and we will post the audio Thursday morning, and tweet out the link. You can also attend the debate at the Logan Library for one or both races.  

The first Tuesday in November is notorious for long lines to tap a few buttons, cast a vote, and possibly change the future course of our state. Depending on where you live, you may not be waiting in line to cast your vote in November.

Several counties across Utah are doing it: mail-in ballots- for everyone, not just the absentee voters. This isn't new, but several counties are trying it for the first time this year.

Hey Cache County! Utah Public Radio, The Herald Journal and Logan Library are teaming up on Wednesday to bring two debates to you:

House of Representatives candidates Curt Webb and Jeffrey Turley @ 7 p.m.

Cache County Attorney Candidates James Swink and Chris Daines @8 p.m.

We're collecting questions... so ask away!

Utah Public Radio will be broadcasting five debates live this election season, in cooperation with the VoteUtah initative. The newly-formed Utah Debate Commission will be producing the state-wide debates. 

Each debate listed below will air live on UPR at 6 p.m. and be re-broadcasted the following morning at 11 a.m.

Should active military members be exempt from paying property taxes while they serve?  Utah voters will answer that question when they head to the polls on Tuesday.

When Democratic Senator Luz Robles began working to get Constitutional Amendment B on the ballot, she says it was about giving back to those in the military who defend the country.

If the turnout for early voting is any indication, the overall voter turnout for the 2012 Utah general election could be high. Mark Thomas, Director of Elections in the Utah Lieutenant Governor’s Office, says he anticipates about 40% of people who intend to vote did so early.

"The numbers that have been reported in from the county clerks show 378,000 have voted either by mail or at the early voting locations so far. This number could certainly increase in the days after Election Day as they count more of those absentee ballots that came in before Election Day."

Women's issues have played a large part in the 2012 campaigns, with many "zingers" coming from candidates surrounding these issues. Romney's "Binders full of women" quickly became an Internet sensation. But women are more than political pawns, they are the largest voting bloc in the country and have the potential to sway the election. How will they vote and why? UPR's Storee Powell talks with Professor Tim Chambless of the Hinckley Institute of Politics at the University of Utah to put women voter trends into context.

While seniors don't tend to vote for a party in the majority, they are the voting bloc with the highest voter participation. And with an aging population, the group continues to grow. As voter ID laws pop up across states, many worry that seniors will be disenfranchised. UPR's Storee Powell talks with AARP Utah's Laura Polacheck and Professor Tim Chambless of the Hinkley Institute of Politics at the University of Utah about why they believe the law is meant to suppress voters.

LDS Democrats Growing in Influence

Nov 5, 2012

"I am."

"I am."

"We are. And Elder [Jay] Jensen is. And President [James] Faust. And Silvia Allred. Brigham Young."

What do all of these people have in common? First, they're Latter-Day Saints. What is less known is that they're also Democrats.

Crystal Young-Otterstrom, the LDS Democrats Caucus vice chairperson, says the combination is actually more common than you might think.

"We're not that small of a minority, as people might think."

One penny for every ten dollars spent. That’s what Cache County needs from voters in order to continue the Recreation, Arts, Parks, and Zoos tax—better known as the RAPZ tax. The tax, which excludes food purchases, was approved by voters in 2002 and is now up for renewal.

Many officials and beneficiaries have argued for the tax, saying it has been a boon for the local economy. North Logan recreation coordinator Brett Daniels supports RAPZ funding.

UPR

The one and only debate between Lieutenant Governor candidates Greg Bell and Vince Rampton took place on Wednesday at Utah State University.  Republican incumbent Bell and Democratic challenger Rampton argued their positions on public lands, the economy, and the budget, among other things.

Perhaps the biggest issue discussed by the candidates was the cost of higher education. Rampton criticizes Governor Gary Herbert for not doing enough to fund state colleges.

Debating constitutional amendment a in the first half of the program today, continuing our Vote Utah series. The amendment proposes the Utah constitution be amended to require a portion of the revenue from all state severance taxes, to be deposited in the state trust fund, beginning in 2016. 

A severance tax is a tax required of all those who extract oil, gas or minerals from land within the state. This amendment would exclude resources taken from Native American tribal land within the state. 

Today on Access Utah is a rebroadcast of Wednesday night's House 2nd Congressional District debate on the Southern Utah University campus, in conjunction with the Michael O. Leavitt Center for Politics and Public Service. UPR Southern Utah Correspondent Chris Holmes moderates with Eric Kirby, Director of the Leavitt Center.   

 The candidates include: 

KPCW's Larry Warren moderates a debate between 1st District Republican Congressman Rob Bishop and his Democratic challenger Donna McAleer, who are both running for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. The debate originally aired during KPCW's Community Voices and UPR's Access Utah.

As a public service to Utah voters, Vote Utah 2012 has compiled a series of three-minute messages from twenty-one candidates for office. Messages include candidates from all four U.S. House districts, the U.S. Senate, and the Governorship. 

To listen to any free speech message, click here.

Here is our broadcast schedule for every free speech message:

10/18

Suggest a Question for the Lieutenant Governor Candidates

Oct 22, 2012

Tune in to the Lieutenant Governor Debate, October 31 at 11:30 on Utah Public Radio

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