Utah News

Utah News
12:55 pm
Wed March 7, 2012

The Big Picture on State Education: a Conversation with Larry Shumway

Without fail, there’s always one issue that dominates much of the discussion during the Utah Legislature’s annual session: public education. This year, issues like reforming teacher contracts, dramatically changing how education dollars are spent and the Common Core standards adopted by the State Board of Education have been debated in the House and Senate. So what does Utah’s top education official think of all this, with just two days left in the session? Jeff Robinson sat down with State Superintendent Larry Shumway at his office in Salt Lake City.

Utah News
12:50 pm
Wed March 7, 2012

A Wolf Pack in Utah? What Would be the Impact?

On Sunday, Division of Wildlife Resources personnel spotted what appeared to be four wolves while performing coyote control from a helicopter in the mountains east of Springville in Utah County. Now the division must determine if the animals are wolves or wolf-dog hybrids before deciding a course of action. Eric Ray spoke with DWR Wildlife Section Chief Kevin Bunnell, who says finding the predators wasn’t a great surprise.

5:30 News
6:05 pm
Tue March 6, 2012

Utah News for Tuesday, March 6

  • Woman Struck and Killed by Truck in Provo
  • State Attorneys Appeal Payment of $5.5 Million Debt Incurred by Warren Jeffs
  • Education a Hot Topic at the Capitol Today

These stories and the rest of the day's headlines, plus legislative coverage and a forecast from the Utah Climate Center.

Utah News
4:54 pm
Tue March 6, 2012

Bill Would Require Drug Test for Utahns on Welfare

Some welfare recipients may be required to undergo drug tests to qualify for benefits under a bill that has passed the house. Republican Representative Brad Wilson of Kaysville explained last week that anyone who fails a drug test could enroll in a treatment program to avoid losing their benefits. Mackinzie Hamilton has more about the bill.

Utah News
4:41 pm
Tue March 6, 2012

Women's History Month, Part 1: Utah Women & Education Project

March is National Women's History Month, and the 2012 theme is Women's Education, Women's Empowerment. In the first of our series on this theme in Utah, we hear from Susan Madsen, Director of the Utah Women & Education Project and professor at Utah Valley University. Findings from her recent studies explain why women in Utah graduate 6% less than men. While they enter college at the national level, they graduate at a much lower rate.

More information about the Utah Women and Education Project at http://www.uvu.edu/wep/.

Utah News
7:28 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Nearly Extinct Onion Planted in Utah Today

The Blanc de Paris Hatif onions from The Centre for Genetic Resources, the Netherlands

A Utah author and researcher has been given a rare vegetable seed from the U.S. government in an effort to prevent further loss of thousands of years of seed heritage. Caleb Warnock planted his very rare onion seeds today in a garden behind his home in Alpine, Utah.

5:30 News
6:45 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Utah News for Monday, March 5

  • A Proposed Bryce Canyon Coal Mine Has Environmentalists Very Concerned
  • Utah's 5th Avalanche Death
  • Lots of Bills Awaiting Governor Herbert's Signature

These stories and the rest of the day's headlines, plus legislative coverage and a forecast from the Utah Climate Center.

Listen Now.

Utah News
5:47 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Gov. Herbert Signs the B.E.A.R. Bill for Rural Development

Governor Gary Herbert has signed a bill to fund economic development in rural Utah. UPR's Kerry Bringhurst was at the state capitol during the signing ceremony and files this report.

Utah News
7:06 pm
Wed February 29, 2012

Southern Utah Man Waits in Jail for Mental Assessment

It sounds almost as if a St. George defense attorney is actually working to keep his client in jail as the court waits for a required mental assessment. Chris Holmes reports from Southern Utah.

Utah News
7:00 pm
Wed February 29, 2012

No More Free College Credit for High School Students

Free college credit for qualifying high school students may be a thing of the past. Concurrent enrollment courses, which are available at most high schools across the state, are seeing large budget cuts, and one lawmaker says the solution is to start charging students who want to receive the credit. KCPW’s Jessica Gail reports on what critics are saying about the measure.

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