Tom Williams

USU Caine College of the Arts

Wednesday’s Access Utah is a part of USU’s Year of the Arts. We’ll talk about Henry Purcell’s  opera “Dido and Aeneas,” and related topics. Our guests will include conductor Nicholas Kraemer and Purcell scholar and Syracuse University professor Amanda Eubanks Winkler. And we’ll hear some music from the opera.

 

Utah State University Opera is presenting the opera “Dido and Aeneas” on April 19 and 20 at 7:30 p.m. and April 21 at 2 p.m. in the Morgan Theatre on the USU Logan campus.

The War on Loneliness

When Graham Cavanaugh divorced his first wife it was to marry his girlfriend, Audra, a woman as irrepressible as she is spontaneous and fun. But, Graham learns, life with Audra can also be exhausting, constantly interrupted by chatty phone calls, picky-eater houseguests, and invitations to weddings of people he’s never met.

Michael Lionstar

Edward Hirsch is the celebrated author of nine books of poetry.

upr.org

Utah Patients Coalition, which is leading a ballot initiative campaign in support of medical marijuana, says that “right now, Utah patients battling cancer, seizures, and other life-threatening conditions must break the law in order to relieve their pain and suffering.

Amazon.com

David Roberts has spent his career documenting voyages to the most extreme landscapes on earth. In his new book, “Limits of the Known,” he reflects on humanity’s—and his own—relationship to extreme risk; and he tries to make sense of why so many have committed their lives to the pursuit of adventure.

CNN.com

Some 200 years after her death, Jane Austen's books are still widely read and loved. Many film adaptations and spin-offs such as 'Pride, Prejudice and Zombies' are also adored by many. The BBC said this about Austen.

"Jane Austen died in 1817, when she was just 41. But in her short life, she exerted more of a lasting influence on British literature and culture than many of her peers who lived twice as long.

wikicommons

Fifty years after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., just one in 10 African Americans think the United States has achieved all or most of the goals of the civil rights movement. That’s according to a recent poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. On Wednesday’s Access Utah, on the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s death, we’ll talk about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., his legacy, and the future of the ideals he so eloquently articulated and strove for.

helenwhitney.com

We don’t know how. We don’t know when. But death comes for us all. 

Penguin Random House

Dr. Anne Spoerry treated hundreds of thousands of people across rural Kenya over the span of fifty years. A member of the renowned Flying Doctors Service, the French-born Spoerry learned how to fly a plane at the age of forty-five and earned herself the cherished nickname, "Mama Daktari"--"Mother Doctor"--from the people of Kenya. Yet few knew what drove her from post-World War II Europe to Africa. Now, in the first comprehensive account of her life, Dr.

Weller Book Works

Patty Rayman was born with the ability to communicate with animals and has helped thousands of people resolve many types of behavior, health, attitude and relationship issues with their animal companions. In working with all types of animals, she has developed techniques to help people move from conflict to cooperation in their relationships.

Wikimedia Commons

One month after seventeen people were killed in the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, Women’s March Youth Empower is organizing a national student walkout against gun violence. In most areas, including Utah, the walkout will happen at 10:00 a.m.local time on Wednesday, March 14.

 

The Curies' newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War.

 

Utah Public Radio

A formerly homeless man tries to help young people in Southern Utah. A transgender person in Brigham City finds community in a coven of witches. A gay Navajo man finally decides to leave the reservation to escape the loneliness. And in a suburb of Salt Lake City, a family turns a Mormon tradition on its head to find fellowship. Those are descriptions of episodes from the UPR original series “LGBTQ: Off the Grid,” broadcasting through mid-March.

matikawilbur.com

In 2012, photographer Matika Wilbur sold everything in her Seattle apartment and created Project 562, which reflects her commitment to visit, engage with and photograph all 562 plus Native American sovereign territories in the United States. With this project she has traveled hundreds of thousands of miles, many in her RV (which she has nicknamed the “Big Girl”) but also by horseback through the Grand Canyon, by train, plane, and boat and on foot across all 50 states.

Wildwords.net

“I began my writing career by exploring the tracks humans have left in nature. Now I’m mostly interested in the tracks nature leaves in us.” That’s author Gary Ferguson. He says that nature provides beauty, mystery and community, traits that each of us very much needs. He is the author of 25 books. We talked with Gary Ferguson a few months ago about his latest “Land on Fire.” Today we’ll talk with him about “The Carry Home” a haunting meditation on wilderness, conservation, and grief, written following the death of his wife in a canoeing accident.

B&T

 

Lyndon Johnson's towering political skills and his ambitious slate of liberal legislation are the stuff of legend: the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Medicare, Medicaid, Head Start and environmental reform. But what happened after the bills passed? One man could not and did not go it alone. Bill Moyers, Jack Valenti, Joe Califano, Harry McPherson and the other staff members who comprised LBJ's inner circle were men as pragmatic and ambitious as Johnson, equally skilled in the art of accumulating power or throwing a sharp elbow.

The Salt Lake Tribune

Today on the program, we're discussing the possibility of Utah doing away with the death penalty and as Mitt Romney begins his campaign for Senate, his relationship with Pres. Donald Trump appears to warm.  Huntsville Republican Rep. Gage Froerer leads the charge to do away with the death penalty, and he has some powerful players backing him. And state lawmakers seem to have an extra $209 million to work with in the budget this year. 

IMDB

Whose Streets? is a documentary about the Ferguson uprising, brought to you by the activists and leaders who live and breather this movement for justice. When unarmed teenager Michael Brown is killed by police and the left lying in the street for hours, it marks a breaking point for the residents of St. Louis County. Grief, Long-standing tension, and renewed anger bring residents together to hold vigil and protest the latest tragedy. In the days that follow, artists, musicians, teacher, and parents turn into Freedom Fighters, standing on the front lines to demand justice.

Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault

Several Utah-based organizations including the Rape Recovery Center and Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault recently hosted a town hall conversation focusing on the impact and future of the #MeToo movement. Organizers say “It is time for Utahns to come together to discuss the future of our community. To give survivors an opportunity to define what progress looks like for our community.” They hope to provide forums where the concerns of sexual assault and harassment survivors would be heard.

 

We’ll talk with panelists today, including:

University of Utah

From the University of Utah:

In a new study, University of Utah geographers sought to understand the factors fueling hate across space. Their findings paint a rather grim reality of America; hate is a national phenomenon, and more complicated than they imagined.

The researchers mapped the patterns of active hate groups in every U.S. county in the year 2014, and analyzed their potential socioeconomic and ideological drivers.

Light Up Puerto Rico

 

  It’s been six months since Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico. The hurricane is regarded as one of the worst natural disasters in Puerto Rican history. Some Puerto Ricans expressed the worry at the time that the news cycle would turn and the island’s needs will be forgotten. We’ll try to counteract that tendency today. We’re going to focus on Puerto Rico and try to point you to good ways you can help. We’ll also seek context and look at some history.

Utah State Today

Renowned American political activist, scholar and author Ibram X. Kendi visited USU last fall for a keynote presentation on “How to be an Anti-Racist.” The presentation was sponsored by the USU Access and Diversity Center. Kendi, an award-winning historian and New York Times best-selling author, is professor of history and international relations and the founding director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University. His second book, “Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America,” won the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction.

Book Soup

Salt Lake City resident Gabriel Tallent’s debut novel “My Absolute Darling” has been getting rave reviews. Here’s a synopsis:

National Association of Counties

David Yokum is Director of The Lab @ DC. Under his leadership, The Lab conducts applied research projects to generate evidence that informs the District’s decisions. Yokum was previously a founding member of the White House’s Social & Behavioral Sciences Team and Director of its scientific delivery unit housed at the U.S. General Services Administration. President Obama further institutionalized the work in Executive Order 13707, “Using Behavioral Science Insights to Better Serve the American People.”

Noozhawk.com

On her Twitter account, which by the way is @LindaHyphen, Linda Shaver-Gleason describes herself as a “musicologist, mother, cancer patient.

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