Science communication

Scientific American Blog Network

Today's discussion is on the importance of science communication. We are joined by the Director of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University Laura Lindenfeld, Improv Program Leader of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science Valeri Lantz-Gefroh, Phd candidate and UPR Science Reporter Daniel Kinka, and Aimee Tallian and Director Nancy Huntly of the USU Ecology Center.

Did you know  2.9 trillion pounds of food are wasted each year, which is equal to one-third of the world’s food supply?  This is just one of the many facts you can learn in an award-winning online video about solid waste made by Utah State University engineering student Nathan Guyman.

Mary-Ann Muffoletto

A group of scientists at Utah State University has developed a unique way to share their research with the community. Science Unwrapped is a program that teaches the public about science and how scientists learn to interact with the public.

Ka-Voka Jackson

As you float down the Colorado River from Glen Canyon Dam to Lake Mead you may not realize that river right, the north side of the river, is owned and managed by the National Park Service and river left is managed by several groups including the Hualapai and Havasupai Indian nations.

Physics professor, bestselling author, and dynamic storyteller James Kakalios reveals the mind-bending science behind the seemingly basic things that keep our daily lives running, from our smart phones and digital “clouds” to x-ray machines and hybrid vehicles.

University of Vermont

Scientists, a small group of them, sit in a circle—it's reminiscent of a campfire gathering despite the fact they're in a drab classroom. Everyone is listening intently to the scientist holding up what looks like a 5x7  photograph, but in reality, is just a blank piece of paper. You wouldn’t know it was an imageless page by the number of eyes staring at it. A scientist is sharing a special memory, distinctly describing the details of the “photograph” that means so much. People laugh, cry, feel, and relate in some way to every story told through the simple piece of paper that makes its way to each person around the circle.