Rhesa Ledbetter

Times have changed. The majority of Americans now live in urban environments, and the current generation is defined by technology. This has left some public land agencies fighting to stay relevant.

Our Crossing Borders series, crosses the Utah border into Idaho to tell you about the journey of a mother and her transgender son. Through a series of short vignettes, Page Geske and her son Andrew reflect on their relationship through the years as they share about the loss, healing, and freedom they found through their own border crossing—the transition process.

Wikipedia and University of Utah

LeAnn Williams was married for 31 years. She just lost her husband this past February to an overdose of Oxycodone. LeAnn gently turned through each page of a scrapbook. In her quiet way, she showed me pictures of falling in love with her college sweetheart, winters spent building snow caves in their yard, and growing a family with three beautiful children in Heber City, Utah.  

Tim Magnuson

“I just finished my 10½ mile run,” gasped Travis Peltier as he struggled to catch his breath in a selfie video recently posted on social media. “I want to announce that I started training for the Top of Utah Marathon. This is my 10-year anniversary of getting orthotics.”

Utah Public Radio’s Morning Edition host Kerry Bringhurst shared with me an experience she had as a mother of a son with special needs. She unexpectedly met another mother with a daughter who has the same rare developmental disorder known as Williams syndrome. As Kerry told her story, I couldn’t help but want to learn more about the syndrome and get to know the children their parents describe as being “built on love.”

You may have heard or seen our announcement of an upcoming garden party and home tour to benefit UPR. Some of you have had questions about the location of the event, and why it is so special. Reporter Rhesa Ledbetter wondered as well, so she made a visit to meet the hosts of the party, Bruce Bugbee and his wife Diana West. 

Hannah Russell

You get a rain gauge, measure the precipitation once a day, and upload the information via the web or app—it’s a citizen science project that only takes a few minutes and has real-time application, said Henry Reges, national coordinator of the precipitation reporting network known as CoCoRaHS. 

Scott Sampson

Scott Sampson, better known as "Dr. Scott the Paleontologist," is a household name to many, especially those with young children. He’s the host of the PBS show Dinosaur Train, president and CEO of Science World British Columbia, and an enthusiastic scientist with a passion to inspire kids to get out into nature.

Can Stock Photo

Bacteria are everywhere—throughout our bodies, in the air, and even part of some of the foods we eat, like yogurt. The ubiquitous nature of microbes may be unnerving to some, since these microscopic creatures don’t have a squeaky clean record. Some do cause disease, but the good they bring to the world often goes unnoticed.

Natural History Museum of Utah

Two young brothers were thrilled to find tadpoles swimming in the pond at the Fred and Ila Rose Fife Wetland Preserve in Salt Lake City. They scrambled to take a picture with their tablet camera and upload the photo to an app called iNaturalist. It was a family outing—the boys along with their mother and grandparents took the day to participate in the City Nature Challenge.