Programs

npr.org


torreyhouse.com

Brooke and Terry Tempest Williams came across a copy of British nature writer Richard Jefferies’ autobiography “The Story of My Heart” in a small Maine bookstore. The beautiful volume intrigued them and inspired a journey: they traveled to England in order to learn more about the 19th-century nature essayist, to wander the countryside which so inspired and captivated him. 

Delving into this love letter to nature strengthened and refreshed Terry and Brooke’s relationship with each other and with the natural world. Originally published in 1883, “The Story of My Heart” explores Jeffries’ idea a “soul-life” which he experienced while wandering in England. In essays alongside Jefferies’ original work, Brooke and Terry Tempest Williams contemplate dilemmas of modernity, the intrinsic need for wildness, and what it means to be human in the 21st century. (Torrey House Press.)

Brooke and Terry Tempest Williams will headline two upcoming events in Utah: Thursday, November 20 at 7:00 p.m. at Rowland Hall, Lincoln Street campus in Salt Lake City for The King’s English Bookshop; and Monday, December 1 at 7:00 p.m. at Back of Beyond Books in Moab.

mnn.com

President Obama is demanding that the FCC reclassify the Internet as a public utility under Title II of the Telecommunications Act. He wants rules to ensure “that neither the cable company nor the phone company will be able to act as a gatekeeper, restricting what you can do or see online."

Elise Hu of NPR’s All Tech Considered reports that the president sees reclassification of the internet as the best way to achieve the objectives of an open Internet: No throttling of some content and speeding up others, no paid prioritization — customers getting stuck in a "slow lane" because the sites they are visiting didn't pay a fee — and no blocking content.  According to Hu, big ISPs — Comcast, Verizon and Time Warner — and their trade associations and lobbyists argue that the Title II option would lead to suffocating regulation that would give them no incentive to invest millions in developing new technologies and maintaining or improving the current network connecting Americans to the Internet.


moving.com

    


amazon.com

After nine years of keeping his prostate cancer at bay, the drugs were no longer working. The doctors told him his time was nearly up. So Jeff Metcalf dove deep into writing, tasking himself with writing one essay each week for a year. His new book “Requiem for the Living” contains the best of the resulting fifty-two essays by an author who continues to defy his medical prognosis. The essays form a memoir of sorts, recounting good times and critical moments from Metcalf’s life. 

He does not describe a life defined by cancer but writes to discover what his life has been, who he has become, and what he has learned along the way. Brian Doyle, author of “Two Voices,” says, “I liked this book first for what it is, a cleanly written and fascinating story of a life spent paying close attention to the miracles. But I also like it very much for what it isn’t, and could so easily have been—a work of self-pity, a litany of ills and blaming.” “Requiem for the Living” is funny, moving, profoundly personal, and a testimony to the human spirit.


npr.org

NPR Science Correspondent Joe Palca set out to become a college professor and ended up on the radio. He’s in Logan for several events for UPR and USU and he’s Tom Williams’ guest for the hour on Friday’s AU. They’ll talk about the art of reporting on science and the fascinating stories he has covered, including a story from Utah about the dangers of household sponges.

His recent reporting includes stories about the Rosetta spacecraft getting ready for a rendezvous with a comet; a non-GMO way to get more and tastier tomatoes; a phone app that checks photos for eye disease; and why theories about black holes are full of holes.

Joe Palca will give a talk titled “Unwrapping Science on the Radio” as a part of the Science Unwrapped series presented by USU’s College of Science on Friday at 7:00 p.m. in Eccles Science Learning Center Emert Auditorium, Room 130. The event is free and open to the public and hands-on learning activities and refreshments will follow the presentation. Joe Palca’s USU appearance is sponsored by UPR.

Since joining NPR in 1992, Palca has covered a range of science topics — everything from biomedical research to astronomy. He is currently focused on the eponymous series, "Joe's Big Idea." Stories in the series explore the minds and motivations of scientists and inventors.

www.entomologytoday.org

Zombie ladybugs, a butterfly that changes it spots, and daddy longlegs that use glue to capture prey. These aren't tabloid headlines; They are all true! USU Extension Entomologist explains the fascinating insect world and we introduce the new Zesty Garden module, Bug Bytes. We also look at the gymnocalcium, or globe cactus, in The Green Room as an addition to your home, then in Petals and Prose, Helen Cannon concludes her series on Victory Gardens during World War II.


USDA

The Greater Sage-Grouse is an iconic symbol of the American West.  They thrive in healthy sagebrush ecosystems in prime grazing land. Their population numbers are declining in states across the west.  Utah has a population of roughly 20,000 Greater Sage-Grouse and efforts are currently underway to work with private land owners to help protect the bird and preserve the environments they inhabit. An international forum about wildlife management of the Greater Sage-Grouse is taking place in Salt Lake City today and Friday. 

On Thursday’s AU, Sheri Quinn talks to a 5th generation rancher who grew up with sage-grouse, and USU wildlife biologist Terry Messmer, who conducts research on the biology and natural history of this famous Utah bird.

Then Science Questions at 9:30 AM

penguinbooks.co.za

This week on Science Questions intern, Hope Mckinny, talks to Nelson Mandela's former private secretary, Zelda LaGrange, about her new book, a memoir titled "Good Morning Mr. Mandela".  LaGrange offers insight into what being one of the world's most revered individuals was like.

Land Ethics And Earth

Nov 12, 2014

In a soil-science class, Thad has a life-changing moment, where he realizes human communities are part of the land.


usupress.com

Jim Steenburgh says that for many who come to our state, powder is more than snow. It is a way of life.

Utah has long claimed to have the greatest snow on Earth—the state itself has even trademarked the phrase. In Secrets of the Greatest Snow on Earth: Weather, Climate Change, And Finding Deep Powder in Utah’s Wasatch Mountains and Around the World (Utah State University Press) Steenburgh investigates Wasatch weather, exposing the myths (the famous “lake effect” is, he says, the most misunderstood Wasatch weather phenomenon) and revealing how and why Utah’s powder lives up to its reputation. (One section of the book is titled “Mother Nature’s Five-Step Plan for a Snowstorm.”) 

www2.qsrmagazine.com

A new debate over increases in legal minimum wage has now begun.  Hear UPR Commentator Richard Ratliff discuss how relationship economics could help resolve this debate. 

washingtontimes.com

Robert Poole says that “for most of the country, the longest war in the history of the United States has taken place largely out of sight, the casualties piling up in faraway Iraq and Afghanistan while normal life continued on the home front, with no war taxes, no draft notices, no gas rationing, and none of the shared sacrifice of the nation’s earlier conflicts. The one exception has been in section 60, a corner of Arlington National Cemetery, where more than 900 men and women have come to rest in the past decade.”

On Veterans Day 2014 we’ll talk with Robert Poole, whose book “Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery: Where War Comes Home” is the biography of a five-acre plot where many of those killed in Iraq and Afghanistan have been laid to rest alongside service members from earlier wars. 

April Ashland / Utah Public Radio

What happens when newcomers from the suburbs move into farm country? Or when small-scale backyard farmers in cities or suburbs want to continue or begin operations against neighborhood opposition? Sometimes conflicts ensue. How should these be handled?

In Michigan, a “Right to Farm Act” was created in 1981 to protect farmers from the complaints of people from the city who moved to the country and then attempted to make it more urban with anti-farming ordinances. According to Gail Philburn of the Michigan Sierra Club, a recent ruling by the Michigan Commission of Agriculture and Rural Development “effectively removes Right to Farm Act protection for many urban and suburban backyard farmers raising small numbers of animals.”  

 

On Monday’s AU we’ll talk about Utah laws and rules and discuss the issues with Cache Valley farmers Don Baldwin and Reid Zought; USU Cache County Extension Agent Clark Israelsen; and Logan City Councilman Herm Olsen.

 

 


siarchives.si.edu

The Smithsonian Institution houses a vast collection of artifacts from across the nation and around the world.  What can all of these items tell us about American culture and history?  Friday on Access Utah, Richard Kurin, Under Secretary for History, Art, and Culture at the Smithsonian, joins Sheri Quinn for a discussion about the stories they reveal.  At 9:30 Science Questions explores marijuana policy through the lens of a theologian. 


huffingtonpost.com

At 9:30 Science Questions explores marijuana policy through the lens of a theologian.

Recreational marijuana became legal  in the state of Colorado for those 21 and older in 2014.  Washington and others states are preparing to follow suit.  Today on the program we explore the effects, from a theological perspective, that marijuana policies have had on society.  The Reverend Susan Brooks Thistlethwait, Ph. D joins us.

Coffee for roses- false ideas about your garden
C.L. Fornari

Would you plant your peppers with matches in hopes of hotter fruit? How about a sweeter tomato by watering the plants with sugar water? These are two gardening myths dispelled in the new book by C.L. Fornari, Coffee for Roses and 70 Other Misleading Myths About Backyard Gardening. There are probably more than a few myths that you actually practice on a regular basis.


Albert Bierstadt / wikiart.org

As we move toward the Winter Solstice, we’ll revisit a program from April when we invited three Utah writers to reflect on the environment for Earth Day 2014. Where are we with regard to the environment and the land we love? What progress has been made? What are the most pressing current problems? Jana Richman, author of “The Ordinary Truth,” and other books; Stephen Trimble, whose books include, Bargaining for Eden: The Fight for the Last Open Spaces in America;” and George Handley, author of “Home Waters: A Year of Recompenses on the Provo River,” and other works, reflect on the earth and the land from a poetic and perhaps a political perspective as well.

denverlibrary.org

Today we recap the mid-term elections which saw control of the U. S. Senate return to the Republicans and a Republican clean sweep in Utah’s congressional races. One constitutional amendment passed in Utah and two were defeated. Several state school board incumbents were defeated. 

We’ll open the phone lines for your comments. What race were you keying on? What are your predictions for the future? What issues concern you? Today also marks the unofficial start to the 2016 presidential campaign. We’ll talk about all of this and more with Deseret News columnists LaVarr Webb and Frank Pignanelli; and Mike Lyons and Damon Cann from the USU Political Science Department.


startribune.com

From Farinelli, the eighteenth century castrato who brought down opera houses with his high C, to the recording of "Johnny B. Goode" affixed to the Voyager spacecraft, Elena Passarello, in Let Me Clear My Throat dissects the whys and hows of popular voices. There are murders of punk rock crows, impressionists, and rebel yells; Howard Dean's "BYAH!" and Marlon Brando's "Stella!" and a stock film yawp that has made cameos in movies from A Star is Born to Spaceballs. The voice is thought's incarnating instrument and Elena Passarello's essays are a deconstruction of the ways the sounds we make both express and shape who we are—the annotated soundtrack of us giving voice to ourselves.

Utah’s mountains and foothills blaze with the brilliant foliar colors of aspens, maples, sumacs and more. But autumn colors can be found in less likely habitats too, even across our flat, desolate salt pans. There the usually drab stage has been given a splash of deep, dusty rose color by its sole botanical performers, the pickleweeds.


amazon.com

In “Outlawing Genocide Denial: The Dilemmas of Official Historical Truth” (University of Utah Press) historian and political scientist Guenter Lewy scrutinizes the practice of criminalizing the expression of unpopular, even odious historical interpretations, exemplified by genocide denial. Holocaust denial can be viewed as another form of hatred against the Jews and preventing it can be understood as a form of warding off hate speech. Germany has made it a crime punishable by law. Other European countries have similar laws.

bloggingfoodforthought.blogspot.com

A piece of the 21st century pie--people everywhere are clamoring for their own life-sustaining morsel. But water, pesticide, distribution, and financial issues seem to conspire against assuring a hungry world there will be enough to eat. Noelle Cockett, executive vice president and provost for Utah State University, has long been researching answers to the question of how to feed 21st century populations. Dr. Cockett brought her expertise to Utah State University’s College of Humanities and Social Sciences’ Tanner Talks when she kicked off the 2013-15 lecture series last month with a look into the future of food production. Her talk was titled: “Feast or Famine: Feeding a Hungry World in the 21st Century.”

Provost Cockett will join Tom Williams for Friday’s Access Utah.


Utah is home to 18 species of bats. Today on the Zesty Garden, Michael Wolfe helps us understand this often misunderstood mammal. In Yes You Can!, it becomes a little more clear from Adrie Roberts why your jars sometimes don’t seal. Then Helen Cannon in Petals and Prose continues with victory gardens in World War II and the sacrifices everyone made.


snookerbacker.com

A while back on Access Utah, Glen in the Uintah Basin shared this story: “I used to haul crude oil from oil wells. We have an area in central Duchesne County called the Koch Field. It was originally operated by the infamous Koch brothers' business and developed in the 1970s and early 80s. The Koch field is very remote and quite rugged. Many oilfield workers claimed to have seen a ‘headless horseman.’ I first heard about this when I was dispatched to a load out in the field probably in 1999.

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