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Sickweather

If you’ve been looking this flu season for a way to find out what pathogens are floating around town, there’s an app for that.

A few years ago tech-developer Graham Dodge came down with a stomach virus and, as someone interested in data, he wondered if there was a way to track his ailment in the area he lived to try and get a better picture of how he got sick.

The elderly couple in their living room, which is teeming with artwork.
brenau.edu

Megumi Sasaki, the director of the documentary “Herb and Dorothy 50x50,” first learned about the Vogels while on assignment at the National Gallery in Washington D.C.

“I think that there were about seventy works exhibited there and they were all part of the Herbert and Dorothy Vogel collection,” Sasaki said. “I learned about Herb and Dorothy right there for the first time and I was totally shocked – in a good way.  I just could not believe that was a true story.”

The story is about a couple of humble means who had an insatiable appetite for collecting art. They lived in a one-bedroom apartment in New York City. Herbert Vogel worked as a postal worker and Dorothy Vogel worked as a librarian. They decided to live off of Dorothy’s salary and use all of Herbert’s salary to purchase artwork.

At a high school, four people stand in front of a table, surrounded by posters.
Kari Schott

As the students from the Jordan High School Young Democrats set up their table in the middle of the common area, there was an air of nervous anticipation. This was their first big event as a club and it had already garnered enough attention to attract TV cameras to the scene.

They were holding what's being called a “gender equality bake sale” with the goal to highlight the issue of wage inequality between men and women. The cookies, artfully arranged on the table, were sold at 77 cents apiece for girls, and $1 for boys.

Their president and founder, Kari Schott, said the price of the cookies reflects the current relative earning power of the genders due to pay inequality.

“We mostly got good comments from it, but some people were a little outraged by it. They thought that we were being sexist, which we were, but that’s the point - to maybe start a conversation and make change," Schott said.


Man sitting at an organ, looking at the camera, with one of his arms raised, poised to play.
choralnet.org

The Campbell Organ Festival will present a concert Wednesday evening featuring English organist Stephen Cleobury, the music director at King’s College. You may recognize his playing from UPR’s annual Christmas Eve broadcast of the “Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols” live from Cambridge, England.

He is in Logan this week and will be performing as well as conducting two Utah State University choirs at Wednesday’s concert. He’ll be playing on the recently renovated Holtkamp organ located in the Kent Concert Hall.

Jason Gilmore

The first installment of “52 Strong” comes to us from a Greyhound bus station in Montgomery, Ala. The series follows USU Professor Jason Gilmore and two of his students as they travel through the South as part of a civil rights pilgrimage.

Montgomery, Ala. is contested space. On the one hand, it was considered the cradle of the Confederacy. On the other, the birthplace of the modern civil rights movement. It is the stories of courage and determination of the civil rights movement that drew us here.

140, 221 people in Utah signed up for a health insurance plan through the Affordable Care Act during the Open Enrollment period that ended Feb. 15. Those are the numbers reported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Jason Stevenson with the Utah Health Policy Project, a nonprofit organization that helps people in Utah get health coverage, says the numbers reflect a big increase over last year.

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