Health

Can a Face Mask Protect You From Air Pollution?

Jan 19, 2017

  

Air pollution is a complicated problem without a simple solution. But have you ever wondered what you can do to protect your health on bad air days? Scientists suggest a mask.

Toddler Obesity Significantly Drops In Utah

Nov 30, 2016
Wikimedia Commons

  

  

  

Nearly one in four toddlers are overweight or have obesity, but lately those numbers have dropped. A recent study shows 2-to-4-year-old kids have significantly lower obesity rates than in 2010. In Utah, obesity rates among toddlers dropped from 12.5 percent to 8.2 percent.

 

Intranasal Flu Vaccine Was Ineffective Last Year, Doctors Say

Jun 27, 2016

The intranasal flu vaccine, commonly known as FluMist, has been given to thousands of adults and children since it was introduced in 2003, but the Center for Disease Control and Prevention is now advising against it.

Bad Air Day? Try a Mask.

May 10, 2016

Air pollution is a complicated problem without a simple solution. But have you ever wondered what you can do to protect your health on bad air days? Scientists suggest a mask.

Newborn babies in Utah are tested for 44 medical conditions, one being Phenylketonuria, or PKU, a rare genetic disorder that impacts one in every 10,000 to 15,000 births, according to the Utah Department of Health. A Northern Utah family shares their story about their three children who have PKU.

 

 


Supreme Court Ruling Brings Out Medicaid Discussion

Jun 29, 2015
www.publicdomainpictures.net

The recent Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act has brought the question of Medicaid expansion in Utah to the forefront of the state legislature.

groundswell.org

Rocky Mountain Power representatives met on Tuesday with the Utah Public Service Commission to discuss the costs of alternative energy generation. The power company offers a program called net metering, which allows customers to offset electricity charges when they use their own solar panels or wind generators.

Sickweather

If you’ve been looking this flu season for a way to find out what pathogens are floating around town, there’s an app for that.

A few years ago tech-developer Graham Dodge came down with a stomach virus and, as someone interested in data, he wondered if there was a way to track his ailment in the area he lived to try and get a better picture of how he got sick.

According to a news release from the park, an employee at Zion Lodge tested positive for tuberculosis on March 13. The person is being treated, and a number of people who were in contact with that person are also being tested as a precaution.

David Eaker is a spokesperson for the National Park Service at Zion.

Whit Richardson

Last weekend hundreds of mountain bike connoisseurs converged on Moab to try out the latest and greatest gear.

The event is called Outerbike, and the idea came from Ashley Korenblat, proprietor of the Western Spirit bike shop in Moab.

"Right To Try" Moves Past House

Feb 24, 2015
kirk.senate.gov

A “right to try” bill that would allow terminally ill patients to use experimental medication has taken another step forward in the Utah State Legislature.    

House bill 94 met the approval of the Senate Health and Human Services Committee on Tuesday. Sponsored by Rep. Gage Froerer, R-Huntsville, the bill previously passed the House overwhelmingly by a 72-1 vote.

If you've ever had an eye infection, you know how annoying it can be to get drops of medicine on the eyeball a few times a day. It's an even harder task with children or for older adults who don't always have the dexterity to squeeze they used to.

That's why researchers have developed an ultra-thin contact that can be placed on the eye to deliver drugs slowly — in a matter of hours or they hope even days — before dissolving away.

The federal government banned the sale of raw milk across state lines nearly three decades ago because it poses a threat to public health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Medical Association all strongly advise people not to drink it.

"Is this doctor in my insurance network?" is one of the key questions people ask when considering whether to see a particular doctor. Unfortunately, in some cases the answer may not be a simple yes or no.

Supporters of legislation to help terminally ill patients access FDA trial therapies announced Wednesday the formation of a foundation to help those patients acces expensive experimental drugs.

Two years ago Jonathan Johnson was overseeing a large international company, Overstock.com - but it was his father's health and not his experience as an executive that led him to set up a Right to Try Foundation.

 

Health officials in Illinois are trying to find the source of a measles infection, after five babies were diagnosed with the contagious respiratory disease in a Chicago suburb. Saying that more cases are likely, a health official warns, "The cat is out of the bag."

Because the Illinois patients are all under a year old, they can't be vaccinated. The new cluster of cases joins more than 100 other reports of measles in 14 states this year; most of them have been traced to an outbreak at Disneyland in California in December.

Vietnamese authorities have buried thousands of cats, many of them apparently still alive, that were destined for restaurant tables. The Associated Press says the felines were culled because they posed an environmental and health risk.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

When it comes to organic certification, food producers must follow strict guidelines.

For an organic steak, for instance, the cow it came from has to be raised on organic feed, and the feed mix can't be produced with pesticides, chemical fertilizers or genetic engineering.

Now, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is considering a set of rules for organic farmed fish. Several consumer groups, though, say the recommended rules don't go far enough to meet the strict standards of other organic foods.

Mike Quaglia was 42 when he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, which gradually robs its victims of their ability to move normally. For the next seven years, his condition deteriorated despite medication.

"I was at a point where I was either going to give up and let the Parkinson's take over, or I was going to decide to fight back," Quaglia says.

Fight back he did — literally. Last February he stumbled on a program called Rock Steady Boxing. That's right: It teaches Parkinson's patients how to box.

Across the country, efforts to make marijuana more accessible have quickly gained traction. Medical marijuana is now legal in 23 states, and recreational use is also legal in four states and the District of Columbia.

Science, however, hasn't quite caught up. Largely due to its illegal status, there's been very little research done on marijuana's health effects. And researchers don't fully understand how pot affects the developing teenage brain.

This may explain the why the nation's pediatricians have changed their recommendations on marijuana and children.

Jennifer Pemberton

If it passes, it would be one of the strictest wood burning bans in the nation. State officials are accepting public comment on a proposed winter burn ban. UPR’s Jennifer Pemberton has this report on the overwhelming opposition expressed at Wednesday night’s public hearing in Logan.

In the simplest terms it’s the right to burn versus the right to breathe. At least that’s how those who oppose and support a seasonal ban on wood burning in Northern Utah are voicing it.

Governor Herbert tasked the state Air Quality Board with probing public opinion on the ban, which would prohibit use of all wood stoves in seven inversion-prone Utah counties from Nov. 1 to March 15 in an effort to limit winter air pollution.

At the public hearing Wednesday night in Logan the opposition was overwhelming. The sheriff’s office estimates there were 500 people trying to attend the hearing in the Cache County Courthouse with a capacity of 160.

Vapor produced by electronic cigarettes can contain a surprisingly high concentration of formaldehyde — a known carcinogen — researchers reported Wednesday.

The findings, described in a letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine, intensify concern about the safety of electronic cigarettes, which have become increasingly popular.

Schools are offering more and more healthy foods for lunch. And schools that participate in the National School Lunch program require students to choose a fruit and a vegetable side. Yet plate waste is a big problem in schools; as The Salt has reported, kids throw away anywhere from 24 to 35 percent of what's on their trays.

Noncommunicable diseases have become the leading killers around the globe. In 2012, two-thirds of all deaths worldwide were the result of conditions such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes and respiratory infections. The mortality rate from noncommunicable diseases was even higher in low- and middle-income countries.

What is it that's most likely to kill you? The World Health Organization says that in the 21st century, it's your lifestyle.

And it's not just a Western problem.

Pages