Education

kaboompics.com

Earlier this month, parents with kids in school received an email from the Cache County School District. The email links to an educator-effectiveness survey.

Utah Trust Lands Auctioned Off For School Revenue

Oct 27, 2016
trustlands.utah.gov

The State of Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration, or SITLA, currently manages over three million acres of land.  Although not technically public, these trust lands are generally open for biking, hunting, fishing, and other outdoor activities.  On October 19th, over 3,500 acres of trust lands across the state were sold at auction, generating over $6 million for Utah schools.  Areas that were formerly open for outdoor recreation are now closed. 

nps.gov

 


It has a long name, the Intergovernmental Internship Cooperative or IIC. This month, the program received the National Parks Service Director’s Award for Partnerships.

According to Teri Saa, management assistant at Cedar Breaks National Monument and administrator of the internship program, this program is the first of its kind.

 

ASIACAMPUS.UTAH.EDU

Nine students who began their college education in Asia will finish their degrees here in Utah this year. The University of Utah’s Asia campus works with the South Korean government to bring students to Utah. It also helps students from Utah learn outside the U.S.  

Students Build Homes In the Navajo Nation

Jul 14, 2016
designbuildbluff.org

Each spring, a group of graduate students studying architecture at the University of Utah move to Bluff, Utah. Before the move, they prepare plans for homes and other structures they plan to build. For this year’s project, students designed and built a gateway to the Bluff community educational campus.

Eric Newell

A group of second graders from Edith Bowen Laboratory School got the chance to plant new trees after a section of aspens were torn out during construction along the Blacksmith Fork River in Logan. 

humanities.utah.edu

  Matthew Potolsky teaches English at the University of Utah. He also has been teaching a course for two years on secrecy and surveillance.

“Part of it is that I think a lot of people are unaware of how much they’re being surveilled—how much they’re being watched," Potolsky said.

Solar Power Benefits Local High School

Mar 24, 2016
today.lbl.gov

A new solar panel array was turned on this week at Cottonwood High School in Murray, Utah. The school joins more than 100 Utah organizations that received funding from Rocky Mountain Power’s Blue Sky renewable energy program.


Professor Edward Reeve, at Utah State University's School of Applied Sciences, Technology and Education, was recently elected president of the International Technology and Engineering Educators Association. Training new engineering and technology educators has been a major focus of the Obama administration’s emphasis on STEM education and Reeve, a self-proclaimed “old shop teacher,” built his career around educating the engineering and technology teachers of tomorrow.

 


Utah celebrates International Education Week

Nov 19, 2015
Katie Peikes / UPR

Colleges throughout the country are celebrating International Education Week, honoring the benefits of learning about other cultures and enhancing cultural diversity.

And international student populations keep growing, some Utah colleges say.

Weber State University reported they have about 400 international students, according to Tiana Witkamp, an administrative assistant.

National Week Of Action For School-To-Prison-Pipeline

Oct 9, 2015
Salt Lake Peer Court

Last week was national week of action against school pushout, a practice where schools take an active role in discouraging a student’s education through detention, suspension and expulsion; instead of peer, institutional and parental support.

 

According to a report by Public Policy Clinic of the University of Utah, one in three inmates at the Utah State Prison is a high school dropout.

Students who fail to finish high school are three and a half times more likely to be arrested as an adult.

 

Giving A Voice To Cache Valley's Voiceless

May 27, 2015
A folklorist interviews two refugees around a table.
archives.usu.edu

Many would be surprised to hear that Cache Valley is home to several refugee populations. In partnership with the Library of Congress, the project called “Voices: Refugees in Cache Valley” has been collecting the stories of this largely unknown population.

At a high school, four people stand in front of a table, surrounded by posters.
Kari Schott

As the students from the Jordan High School Young Democrats set up their table in the middle of the common area, there was an air of nervous anticipation. This was their first big event as a club and it had already garnered enough attention to attract TV cameras to the scene.

They were holding what's being called a “gender equality bake sale” with the goal to highlight the issue of wage inequality between men and women. The cookies, artfully arranged on the table, were sold at 77 cents apiece for girls, and $1 for boys.

Their president and founder, Kari Schott, said the price of the cookies reflects the current relative earning power of the genders due to pay inequality.

“We mostly got good comments from it, but some people were a little outraged by it. They thought that we were being sexist, which we were, but that’s the point - to maybe start a conversation and make change," Schott said.


bustos.house.gov

New legislation may require Utah high school students to pass a citizenship test in order to graduate. After receiving approval from the Senate in a vote of 20-8, the bill is in its final stages in the House of Representatives.

Introduced by Sen. Howard Stephenson (R-Draper), the bill would require students to answer 50 questions on American Government and get 75 percent correct before receiving a high school diploma. The test would be similar to a citizenship test, which requires knowledge of principles of American Government, American History and Integrated Civics. However, citizenship tests only require a minimum score of 60 percent.

This year, the Utah State University Athletics Department’s slogan is “the climb.” While administrators were probably thinking about athlete performance, their scores and stats aren’t the only thing climbing.

Since 2008, the USU student athletic fee has increase by 311 percent. At this point, the department receives more than $4 million in revenues every year from student fees alone. Yet despite this, they are still claiming a deficit of almost half a million dollars. That’s according to the 2013/2014 USU Appropriated Budget.

The athletics department is requesting $1.5 million from the state legislature this year.

Listen up, cub reporters. Lesson 1: Never miss an opportunity to catch a good story. I was doing important hop research at my local craft beer emporium, aka my bar.

"This red IPA is great. What is this again?" I asked the bartender.

"That's Line 51. From Oakland. The owner, P.T., does it part time. He has a day job." What's he do? I asked. "He's a schoolteacher."

Bingo! Secret teachers, you can't hide from this NPR Ed sleuth, no sir.

Utah students, parents, and educators will join in a national celebration Jan. 25-31, 2015 to recognize school choice.  Participants in the 2015 National School Choice Week are hoping to encourage communities to look at different ways of helping to educate today's youth.

Early Monday morning Andrew Campanella, President of the non-profit organization National School Choice Week, rang the opening bell of the New York Stock Exchanging to mark the official beginning of the celebration.

Competency-based education is in vogue — even though most people have never heard of it, and those who have can't always agree on what it is.

After a long stretch as the law of the land, annual standardized tests are being put to, well, the test.

This week, the Senate education committee held a hearing on the reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law and, specifically, on testing. The committee's chairman, Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., has released a draft bill offering a lot more leeway to states in designing their own assessment systems.

Researchers in Europe have managed to read from an ancient scroll buried when Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 A.D. The feat is all the more remarkable because the scroll was never opened.

The Vesuvius eruption famously destroyed Pompeii. But it also devastated the nearby town of Herculaneum. A villa there contained a library stacked with papyrus scrolls, and the hot gas and ash preserved them.

Sort of.

Hundreds of elementary schools were protesting the illegal seizure of their playground by a private developer in Nairobi, Kenya, when police fired tear gas into the crowd.

The incident sparked outrage across the city — and on social media, where Kenyans tweeted with the hashtag #OccupyPlayGround.

Orem Teacher Heads To Auschwitz

Jan 21, 2015
Jewish Virtual Library

Seventy years ago prisoners were liberated from the former German Nazi concentration and death camps. “Auschwitz: The Past is Present,” is a professional development program developed by the USC Shoah Foundation – The Institute for Visual History and Education and Discovery Education. 

The non-profit organization is sponsoring a program to give educators an opportunity to learn more about the capture and release of prisoners there. Merinda Davis is a teacher in Orem and is one of only 25 teachers from around the world to be selected to travel to Poland this week.

I asked Davis why she applied and she told me that when she was 12 she was in the public library and saw a book title, “Six Million.”

What year was the Constitution written?

Who was president during World War I?

If you couldn't answer one or both of the above, you might not be able to pass a civics test given to candidates for U.S. citizenship. Or (starting in 2017) graduate from high school in Arizona.

On Thursday, Gov. Doug Ducey signed a bill making a high school diploma in the state contingent upon students passing the same test given to candidates for U.S. citizenship. The class of 2017 will be the first to have the new requirement.

Close your eyes for a minute and daydream about a world without bubble tests.

Education Week recently reported that some Republican Senate aides are doing more than dreaming — they're drafting a bill that would eliminate the federal mandate on standardized testing.

U.S. Department of Education

The start of 2015 opened up an opportunity for college-bound students in Utah and across the U.S. who need help paying for tuition. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or "FAFSA," determines how much financial aid schools can award based on a family’s financial situation. The application can be filed now, and Dr. Laurie Wolfe with the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators said being prepared can make the process less stressful.

"It's a good time to sit down with the family," Wolfe said. "And start talking about,'What do we need to be looking at?’ I highly encourage people to get hold of a copy of that application now, look through it, pull together the documents that you need."

The list of documents includes income-tax returns and investment statements. The application deadline is June 30, but to avoid missing any deadlines for special scholarship programs, Wolfe recommends completion before Feb. 15.

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