Arts and Culture

Immerse Yourself: More Than An Art Market

Oct 19, 2014
A beautiful white lidded, ceramic pot with a ceramic blue bird perched on top.
Utah Museum of Natural History

The Natural History Museum of Utah will host Native American artists from across the state this weekend. We spoke with organizers of the event to learn more about what makes these Native American creations so unique.

Twenty Native American artists of tribes from Apache to Zuni will participate at this year’s second annual Indian Art Market.  A wide range of mediums will be on display including jewelry, sculpture, beadwork, fetish carving, and pottery.


The Artist's Gallery: A Grand Opening

Oct 15, 2014
A painting displaying beautiful autumn colors in Logan.
Vlad Krylov

Cache Valley boasts many gems, from its beauties in nature to its hidden outdoor adventure destinations.  Also lesser-known is the fact that the Valley is home to a thriving community of talented artists. Representatives from the Cache Valley Center for the Arts spoke about the grand opening for their new gallery in downtown Logan. One of their goals: to feature and uncover these great artists.

The new art gallery in downtown Logan, located in the Bullen Center, will be opening after months of dedicated passion and work. Adam Shelton, the Marketing Director for the Cache Valley Center for the Arts, says the opening exhibition displays a fascinating variety of works.

“I’ve been walking through as they’ve been setting up and it’s really interesting to see the works of photography standing right next to jewelry, standing right next to ceramics, and all of those arts working together,” said Shelton. “I think it’s like having an all-year-round Summerfest, right indoors.”

City Celebrities Dance With The Stars In Southern Utah

Oct 14, 2014

Moab Valley’s mayor, David Sakrison, is putting on his dancing shoes Friday to compete in the first Dancing with the Moab Stars competition to raise money for their multicultural center.

The mayor was partnered with professional dancer, Rita “Hurricane” Maldonado.

“So for the last month in a half I’ve been practicing with my partner we’re doing a bachatango," Sakrison said. "And it‘s going to be a lot of fun and it’s for a good cause.”

Rhiana Medina, the executive director of the Moab Valley Multicultural Center, said getting their stars first was important.

Theatre Campaigns To Save Its Graffiti

Sep 30, 2014
egyptiantheatrecompany.org

His works of stencil and spray paint have sold for tens of thousands of dollars in auctions. His true identity is cloaked in a veil of secrecy and he incites a media circus wherever his work appears. Most of his works are in large cities across Europe and North America.

David Wall, professor of visual studies at Utah State University spoke with UPR about the appeal of the mysterious street artist known as “Banksy.”

“We love things that are kind of dangerous because so little of our own lives are ever lived like that. That’s what James Dean’s great appeal was, that’s what Elvis’ great appeal was,” Wall said.

In 2010, residents of Park City woke up to find that the town of 7,500 people was now home to not one, but three Banksy works. The film about Banksy, “Exit Through The Gift Shop,” premiered at the Sundance Film Festival the same time the paintings appeared, And one of the Banksy pieces ended up on a side door of the Mary G. Steiner Egyptian Theatre. Theatre manager Randy Barton awoke to the news that the artist had left his mark.

Sometimes art can change how people see the world. But Anna Coleman Ladd made art that changed how the world saw people.

It was World War I, and soldiers were coming home from the battlefield with devastating injuries. Those who survived were often left with disfigured faces.

Painting Music: Enchanted Modernities

Sep 22, 2014
A huge, richly colorful cloud blooming out from a manor, small in comparison
acousmata.com

Is it possible to see music? Or hear a painting? The art exhibition "Enchanted Modernities: Mysticism, Landscape and the American West" answers these questions and more by exploring the impact of Theosophy, an esoteric-philosophical movement, on visual artists, writers, and composers in the American West.

Alexander Scriabin, a Russian pianist and composer who was deeply influenced by Theosophy, visualized a grand magnum opus, or large and important work, which he entitled “Mysterium.” This week-long, multimedia performance would have taken place in the Himalayas incorporating music, incense, dance, and light. This great and final concert would ultimately bring about the end the world. Luckily for the fate of the rest of us, this work remained unfinished.

A traveling Ugandan children’s choir will perform in Logan Friday evening.

This concert will be filled with bright costumes, smiles, and songs delivering messages of hope and joy. As these children travel and perform far from home, they are not only helping kids back in Uganda, but are brightening the lives of those who they meet along the way.

This is the second year Robert and Barbara Guy have hosted the kids.

UMA

On Thursday, Utah will host their own version of the Grammys. The “Utah Music Awards” or “UMA’s” will be a glamorous evening of awards and performances, giving Utahns their chance to get the “Hollywood Treatment” in the Beehive State.

If you were asked what the bands Neon Trees, Imagine Dragons, The Used, Royal Bliss, Panic and the Disco and The Killers all have in common, what would you say? It’s a little known fact that all of these bands actually got their start in Utah.


What’s In A Name? Comic Con 2014

Sep 9, 2014

  It was a crowded mass of pop culture hysteria at Salt Lake Comic Con this weekend. However, due to pending legal action from San Diego about the Salt Lake event’s use of “Comic Con” in their name, it begs the question: What does Comic Con mean to fans? Should a name change be considered?

UPR Reporter Takes Day Trip To Salt Lake Comic Con

Sep 8, 2014
Melissa Allison

UPR’s Melissa Allison surprised her sons last week with a day trip to Comic Con in Salt Lake City. The day proved to be more than any of them had anticipated but, by the end of the day, no one was complaining. 

"If you’d have told me 18 months ago I’d be taking my two boys, Sam - 20 and Jack - 17, to Comic Con and reporting our experience for Utah Public Radio, I would have laughed it off and said it was impossible," Allison said. "My family was going through a crisis that didn’t seem to end and I was in survival mode. But, here we are and this is our adventure."

Listen to the complete interviews below:

Salt Lake Comic Con kicked off Thursday, and the allure of pop culture, science fiction and comics is expected to break attendance records.

Last year’s event was the first in Salt Lake history and surpassed expectations. About 72,000 people attended the Con in 2013, setting a new record in attendance for a convention in Utah. The 72,000 people also set new highs in attendance for a first-year comic con event.

Excitement over the convention has expanded vastly since last year, as evidenced by the more than 120,000 tickets which have already been sold for this year’s Con.

Orphan Outreach Organization Performs in Southern Utah

Sep 4, 2014
choir, matsiko World Orphan Choir
The Pioneer

The Matsiko World Orphan Choir is coming to Shepard of the Hills United Methodist Church in St. George. The choir is made up of 17 children from as far away as India, Peru and Liberia.

The choir is part of the International Children’s Network, an organization which seeks to pair sponsors with orphaned or at-risk children.

Don Windham co-founded the International Children’s Network with his wife in 1997. 

Orphan Cars: A View From Kenosha

Aug 20, 2014
Brian Champagne / Utah Public Radio

If you drive a Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Saturn, or Plymouth, your car is an orphan… the company that built it is no longer in business. You can expect it to get tougher to get parts as time goes by. But that’s nothing compared to the people you’re about to meet. UPR’s Brian Champagne traveled to Kenosha, Wisconsin to bring you their story.

  View the entire album on Facebook.

The Art Of Making Steel Appear Weightless

Aug 18, 2014
The artist, Cache Valley local Michael Bingham, in his studio with the skeleton of his enormous, floating astronaut sculpture.
Ali Snow / Utah Public Radio

When the Salt Lake Arts Council called for submissions for their temporary public art project in January, Cache Valley artist Michael Bingham heeded the call. His proposal was one of 12 selected to make their street sculpture visions a reality. 

Standing in the midst of this metal shop there’s an overwhelming sense of power, energy, and even danger. Perhaps it is from the massive machinery that fills the room, each with their own capabilities to cut, mold, and bend steel with ease.

This is the studio in which Cache Valley artist Michael Bingham works every day. We chatted together next to a giant, nine-foot tall skeleton of an astronaut made out of steel rods and rebar. When thinking about what he could make that would align with the public art project’s theme “Flying Objects,” he said an astronaut is immediately what came to mind.

“Probably a combination of things. Childhood dreams of wanting to be an astronaut [laughs]. Maybe like every other little boy," Bingham said. 


The audience sits outside on the grass to hear the Utah Symphony play, with gorgeous southern utah scenery in the background.
Ali Snow / Utah Public Radio

Can you imagine a more picturesque setting to have an open air concert than Utah’s National Parks? That’s just what the Utah Symphony has set out to do for their free concert series this week.

This week the Utah Symphony will embark on their “Mighty 5 Tour,” a tour which will hit Utah’s five iconic National Parks: Capitol Reef, Arches, Canyonlands, Bryce Canyon, and Zion.

Set against the stunning natural backdrop of “Red Rock Country,” they have programmed music that complements as well as contemplates this breathtaking scenery. Two movements of Dvorak’s “New World Symphony” will be on the program, perhaps emphasizing the almost “other-worldly” nature of this scenery for those who have never experienced it before.


Hindu Gods And Culture Featured In New Exhibits

Jul 31, 2014
Fazal Sheikh; courtesy of Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York

The Utah Museum of Fine Arts is scheduled to showcase two exhibits of Hindu art in upcoming months.

The first show is a traveling exhibition “Moksha: Photography by Fazal Sheikh,” which showcases black-and-white photographs that tell the story of outcast widows taking refuge in a holy Indian city, Vrindavan.

Ryan Cunningham / Utah Public Radio

Thursday wraps up the Ninth Annual Governor’s Native American Summit, which took place on the campus of Utah Valley University. The Summit was created under former Gov. Jon Huntsman in an effort to improve state government relations with Utah’s Native American tribal leaders. Governor Gary Herbert, who was Lieutenant Governor at the inaugural Summit, spoke to attendees on Wednesday morning, and he took care of some long-awaited business in the process.

In a darkened theatre, Karen Keltner conducts the orchestra. She is looking down at her musical score which is spread out on a stand.
U-T San Diego

Have you ever considered what an amazing act of faith it is, for a conductor, to signal an upbeat and come down and expect sound to happen? We now introduce a fearless Karen Keltner, resident conductor of the San Diego Opera, who has helped to make the Utah Festival Opera and Musical Theatre a success now for eighteen seasons.

A native Hoosier from South Bend, Indiana, Karen Keltner says that she was bitten by the collaborative music-making bug early on in life. She began to take piano lessons at age six and the deal was, she had to practice an hour a day.

Run My Roadtrip: History And Custard

Jul 28, 2014
Brian Champagne / Utah Public Radio

Summer is the time of family reunions, vacations, and roadtrips. Brian Champagne is traveling across the country with your tips and suggestions on where to stop and how to deal with family and kids. From custard to historic sites, Brian reports.

Southern Utah University and the Utah Shakespeare Festival have announced that Big D Construction has been selected as the general contractor to head construction of the new Beverley Taylor Sorensen Center for the Arts.

Festival Co-Artistic Director David Ivers expressed enthusiasm at this latest milestone in the project.

St. George Airshow Features The Quirky And Patriotic

Jul 25, 2014
Blue angels plane
Carl Berger / Utah Public Radio

The Thunder Over Utah Airshow will be in St. George this weekend. The event will feature historical reenactments, the U.S. Navy's Blue Angels and some more quirky displays.

Between 20 and 25,000 residents and tourists are expected to attend the show this year. Show Director Kevin Walsh says he expects the event to be good for local businesses.

Walsh says he basically grew up at air shows. Both he and his father have each been in the business for more than 20 years. At the show Friday, he said he was excited to have the U.S. Navy Blue Angels perform at the event.

Run My Roadtrip: On The Road Interview

Jul 25, 2014
Brian Champagne / Utah Public Radio

You're listening to Utah Public Radio, I'm Kerry Bringhurst. We continue our conversation with Brian Champagne, a professor of journalism at Utah State University, and a contributor to UPR. Run My Roadtrip, a series of reports we've been hearing from Brian, and we're with him.

Run My Roadtrip: Crossing The Great Western States

Jul 21, 2014
road and wilderness out front windshield
Brian Champagne

Summer is the time of family reunions, vacations, and roadtrips. We asked you for your travel tips to help UPR guest reporter Brian Champagne run a roadtrip from Kenosha, Wisconsin and back. Brian sent us this report, after crossing Wyoming and Nebraska.
Like many family roadtrips, Brian’s isn’t going quite as smoothly as expected. He reports:
 

Bar Fights And Gunfire, "Nerds" Defy Stereotypes

Jul 18, 2014

Very often as humans, we try to categorize the things we experience and the people we meet. We often dismiss what we do not understand. In a lot of ways, it makes it easier for us to get through life. Unfortunately, this is also how stereotypes are formed. This story is about a group who don't fit their stereotype.

rainbow gathering
Wikipedia

Over the holiday weekend—and in the days leading up to it—you may have heard us report on something called the Rainbow Gathering. The event, which took place over the weekend, is a meeting of the self-proclaimed Rainbow Family, a group formed in the early 1970s at the height of hippy culture. The group has met annually since 1972 at its national gathering, and this year, about 8,000 Rainbow Family members convened just a few miles east of Heber City, Utah.

Ever since the location of this year’s Rainbow Gathering was publicized, there were concerns about a clash of cultures arising between the free-spirited attendees and the small-town residents of Heber. But did that conflict really pan out?

It’s the Fourth of July, and I’m having lunch at a busy burger joint in Heber City, Utah, called Dairy Keen—not to be confused with a different burger joint with a very similar name. As you could probably guess, business is booming today, and an unofficial survey of customers reveals that most people are from out of town. But no one here looks like they’re heading to the Rainbow Gathering today. I asked Dairy Keen manager Kim Houtz if she had actually come into contact with the Rainbow Family.

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