Access Utah

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), Approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S.—43.8 million, or 18.5%—experiences mental illness in a given year.1 Approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S.—9.8 million, or 4.0%—experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.2 Approximately 1 in 5 youth aged 13–18 (21.4%) experiences a severe mental disorder at some point during their life. For children aged 8–15, the estimate is 13%.3

Alfred A. Knopf

Richard Bushman is professor of history emeritus at Columbia University and formerly the Howard W. Hunter Chair of Mormon Studies at Claremont Graduate University.

Penguin Random House

Historian and Harvard professor Laurel Thatcher Ulrich was recently on the USU campus to give a talk presented by the USU History Department and sponsored by the Tanner Talks Series in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Public radio’s Dr. Zorba Paster is in Logan for several events presented by UPR and he’ll join us for the hour today to talk about healthy living, the latest medical science, and to answer your questions.

http://www.stonehillalumni.org/s/1641/start.aspx

We’ll celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, a day early, with folklorist Lisa Gabbert, who says “Over time, St. Patrick’s Day has become a very American holiday; today, it is largely a festive rite of spring—green being the appropriate spring color—characterized by the performance of “Irishness” through the use of (often stereotyped) symbols.  Many people, not merely those with ancestral connections to Ireland, enjoy “being Irish” for the day, as it is a way to celebrate Irish music and culture, along with better weather.” We’ll ask why is this unofficial holiday so popular in the U.S.

http://www.marketplace.org/topics/health-care

  Republicans in Congress are attempting to keep their long-standing promise to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. They say the ACA is a disaster and likely to implode. Democrats warn that millions of people will lose access to affordable health care if the repeal passes. We’re going to talk about it on Access Utah today. What should our health care system look like? Is healthcare a right? Is the ACA a massive deficit-busting entitlement program? If you prefer a more market-based system how would that work?

http://www.pcta.org/wild/category/wildbook/

Our guest for the hour on Monday’s Access Utah is Cheryl Strayed, author of the #1 New York Times bestselling memoir “Wild,” the New York Times bestsellers “Tiny Beautiful Things” and “Brave Enough,” and the novel “Torch.”

The Oscar-nominated movie adaptation of “Wild” stars Reese Witherspoon as Cheryl and Laura Dern as Cheryl's mother, Bobbi. The film was directed by Jean-Marc Vallée, with a screenplay by Nick Hornby. 

Trinity University Press

Our guest for the hour today is Brooke Williams, author most recently of Open Midnight:

  

https://www.ghostranch.org/instructors/jennifer-sinor/

Jennifer Sinor is the author of Letters Like the Day: On Reading Georgia O'Keeffe, a collection of essays inspired by the letters of the American modernist Georgia O'Keeffe and Ordinary Trauma, a memoir of her military childhood told through linked flash nonfiction. She teaches creative writing at Utah State University where she is a professor of English. She is also the author of The Extraordinary Work of Ordinary Writing: Annie Ray's Diary, a book about the diary of her great, great, great aunt, a woman who homesteaded the Dakotas in the late nineteenth century.

  Natalie Andrews, a Wall Street Journal social media editor and reporter, will give a talk today at USU as a part of the Morris Media & Society Lecture Series, which is facilitated by Utah State’s Department of Journalism and Communication. Here’s how the department describes the talk: “It's now clear that we live in an era of fake news, troll tweets and email dumps. So what does that mean for media, our democracy and our future?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Kristof

On this episode of Access Utah our guest is Pulitzer Prize-Winning New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof. The website for the Half the Sky Movement, founded by Mr. Kristof and his wife Cheryl WuDunn, says: “The central moral challenge of our time is reaching a tipping point.

http://www.communityhealthstrategies.com/

From time to time we gather as a UPR community to compile a book list. On the next Access Utah we’re going to concentrate on Children’s Books. What are you reading to your kids? What are your children reading? What’s your favorite children’s book of all time? How about a new title or something you’ve just discovered that you’d like to share with us?

W. W. Norton & Company

In an era when humans spend much of their time indoors staring at the dim glow of a screen, many of us have forgotten the simple pleasure of a stroll through a wooded glen, a hike up a secluded mountain path, or a nap in the grass. Williams muses, many of us have a dog or go to the beach occasionally. But is that enough?

bookcellarnic.com

  New York, 1888. The miracle of electric light is in its infancy. Thomas Edison has won the race to the patent office and is suing his only remaining rival, George Westinghouse, for the unheard of sum of one billion dollars. To defend himself, Westinghouse makes a surprising choice in his attorney: He hires an untested twenty-six-year-old fresh out of Columbia Law School named Paul Cravath.

http://www.ictsd.org/bridges-news/bridges-africa/news/us-election-world-prepares-for-new-era-following-surprise-trump-win

Faculty of CHaSS present a Panel Discussion: Election 2016 – Opportunities and Challenges for a New Era. Wednesday, February 1 at 4:00 PM, Merrill Cazier Library, room 101. Listen to a lively panel discussion with faculty members from throughout CHaSS: Debra Jenson, Journalism and Communication; Jason Gilmore, Languages, Philosophy and Communication Study; Anna Pechenkina and Damon Cann, Political Science; and Lawrence Culver, History.  Today on Access Utah Jason Gilmore and Lawrence Culver join us in studio to discuss.

poetryfoundation.org

From Epicurus to Sam Cooke, the Daily News to Roots, Gregory Pardlo’s collection “Digest” draws from the present and the past to form an intellectual, American identity. In poems that forge their own styles and strategies, we experience dialogues between the written word and other art forms. Within this dialogue we hear Ben Jonson, we meet police K-9s, and we find children negotiating a sense of the world through a father’s eyes and through their own.

Viking Books

Julie Berry was inspired to write her new historical novel, “The Passion of Dolssa,” while listening to a college lecture she found online about medieval France. Fascinated, Berry began a two-year dive into research on the era, learning about the lives of several medieval female mystics like Clare of Assisi, Marguerite Porete, and Catherine of Siena, women who rejected marriage, almost unheard of at the time, and bucked the authority of the church with their own religious visions. “The Passion of Dolssa” is set during the 13th Century in southern France (the area now known as Provence), in the aftermath of the Albigensian Crusade.


http://www.moncleronlineshop.net/#from=https://www.google.com/

 

   What’s in a name? Today we’ll explore that question. We’re asking you: What do you think of your name? What was your thought process in naming your children? Are there names that are passed down in your family? Have you ever wanted to change your name? Did you? What’s the most unusual or distinctive name you’ve encountered? How does your name affect you? How do you think your name is perceived?

Former Utah State University football player Torrey Green is charged with four counts of rape. Videos of behind-closed-doors meetings of Mormon officials surface on the internet the last day of General Conference. Salt Lake County Recorder Gary Ott meets

    Former Utah State University football player Torrey Green is charged with four counts of rape. Videos of behind-closed-doors meetings of Mormon officials surface on the internet the last day of General Conference. Salt Lake County Recorder Gary Ott meets with the County Council to address an audit of his office. And "Operation Diversion" continues to address the drug problem among Salt Lake's homeless population.

https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deepwater_Horizon

  On April 20, 2010, a blast aboard the Deepwater Horizon offshore oil platform killed 11 workers, critically injured others and caused a leak that spilled thousands of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico for more than three months. The Deepwater Horizon, one of worst environmental disasters in history, is now the subject of a pulse-pounding new movie. Historian and archaeologist, USU Professor of Environment and Society, Joseph Tainter will watch the film with special interest.

Double Day Publisher

  Mark Twain, the highest-paid writer in America in 1894, was also one of the nation’s worst investors. “There are two times in a man’s life when he should not speculate,” he wrote. “When he can’t afford it and when he can.” After losing hundreds of thousands of dollars back when a beer cost a nickel, he found himself neck-deep in debt. His heiress wife, Livy, took the setback hard. She wrote, “I cannot get away from the feeling that business failure means disgrace.” Twain vowed to Livy he would pay back every penny.

anthropology.usu.edu

  Access Utah we’re going to talk about I.Q. v. E.Q. USU professors Jacob Freeman and Jacopo Baggio, along with UT-San Antonio professor Thomas Coyle, are studying the dynamics of nerds and poets. They want to understand the best brew of nerdiness and sensitivity to create teams that get things done. How can people work better together and why do some groups work well under pressure and some groups don’t? Professors Freeman and Baggio will join us to discuss the differences between I.Q. and emotional and social intelligence.

http://upcolorado.com/university-press-of-colorado/item/2896-the-man-who-thought-he-owned-water

  On Wednesday’s Access Utah our guest for the hour is Tershia d’Elgin, author of “The Man Who Thought He Owned Water: On the Brink with American Farms, Cities, and Food” (University Press of Colorado).

http://radiowest.kuer.org/post/debate-over-bears-ears

    

  On Monday's Access Utah, we revisit portions of our favorite Public Lands episodes. We feature a discussion with Terry Tempest Williams, talking about her book "The Hour of Land"; a segment from our episode on Public Lands Initiative and Bears Ear National Monument, and a conversation with listeners from an episode featuring Fredrick Swanson and his book "Where Roads Will Never Reach".

ROBIN HOLLAND

  Karen Armstrong, in her book “Fields of Blood: Religion and the History of Violence” writes that: “In the West the idea that religion is inherently violent is now taken for granted and seems self-evident. As one who speaks on religion, I constantly hear how cruel and aggressive it has been, a view that, eerily, is expressed the same way almost every time: ‘Religion has been the cause of all the major wars in history.’” Armstrong asserts that: “The problem lies not in the multifaceted activity that we call ‘religion’ but in the violence embedded in our human nature and the nature of the state…”

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