Access Utah

According to Colin Dickey, author of the forthcoming book about conspiracy theories called “The Unidentified,” such theories appear and spread at moments of upheaval and cultural anxiety.

The Colorado River is an essential resource for a surprisingly large part of the United States, and every gallon that flows down it is owned or claimed by someone. David Owen traces all that water from Colorado's headwaters, to its parched terminus, once a verdant wetland but now a million-acre desert. HE takes readers on an adventure downriver, along a labyrinth of waterways, reservoirs, power plants, farms, fracking sites, ghost towns, and rv parks, to the spot near the U.S.-Mexico border where the river runs dry.

According to the Dessert News, "Some disaffected Republicans and Democrats who say extreme views are co-opting their parties have decided to carve out a middle ground in Utah politics. Taking a centrist approach, the group announced the formation of the United Utah Party.

Executive Director of the United Utah Party, Jim Bennet, and University of Utah associate professor of political science, Tim Chambless, come on the show to answer your questions and explain the new party. 

The Handmaid's Tale: Wednesday's Access Utah

May 24, 2017

 

 

There are over 30 million birders in this country alone, according to the Cornell Institute of Ornithology.  Why are so many people interested in birds and birdsong?

"Birds might reveal the secrets of Communication" writes Sylvia Torti in her new novel "Cages." 

The words “Nixonian” and “Watergate territory” are being used increasingly in connection with the Trump Administration.

Next time on Access Utah we’ll examine those comparisons with John A. Farrell, author of the new book, “Richard Nixon: The Life.”

Las Vegas-based writer Laura McBride, is out with a new novel. “‘Round Midnight” spans the six decades when Las Vegas grew from a dusty gambling town into the melting pot metropolis it is today. It is the story of four women-- one who falls in love, one who gets lucky, one whose heart is broken, and one who has always wondered--whose lives change at the Midnight Room.

Laura McBride, author previously of “We Are Called to Rise,” is a graduate of Yale. She teaches at the College of Southern Nevada and lives in Las Vegas with her family.

As of last year, suicide was the leading cause of death among 10- to 17-year-olds in Utah and the youth suicide rate had tripled since 2007. Teen suicide is a hot topic lately with the advent of the Netflix series “13 Reasons Why.” Several groups, including The Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide, have expressed concerns that the media tends to glamorize and sensationalize suicide. We’ll talk about it next time on Access Utah, when our guests will include a representative from the Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide.

David Sandum appeared to have it all: a beautiful young family and a promising career ahead as a business consultant. But his life started veering off course, and upon returning to his native Scandinavia, he fell into an inexplicable, deep depression.

I'll Run Till the Sun Goes Down is an account of Sandum's struggle to overcome his crippling mental illness. After years of hopeless despair, bleak hospitalizations, and shattered dreams, he is finally saved by his art. The paintbrush becomes his lifeline. 

tesla.com

  USU Marketing Professor Edwin Stafford and his family have been early adopters of various forms of green technology. They have solar panels and a ground sourced energy system, for example. The next step, they decided, was the purchase of a Tesla electric vehicle as the new family car. Professor Stafford recounts some of their experiences in his article “Bridging the Chasm: An Early Adopter’s Perspectives on how Electric Vehicles Can Go Mainstream,” to be published in June in Sustainability: The Journal of Record.   

 

 

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), Approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S.—43.8 million, or 18.5%—experiences mental illness in a given year.1 Approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S.—9.8 million, or 4.0%—experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.2 Approximately 1 in 5 youth aged 13–18 (21.4%) experiences a severe mental disorder at some point during their life. For children aged 8–15, the estimate is 13%.3

Alfred A. Knopf

Richard Bushman is professor of history emeritus at Columbia University and formerly the Howard W. Hunter Chair of Mormon Studies at Claremont Graduate University.

Penguin Random House

Historian and Harvard professor Laurel Thatcher Ulrich was recently on the USU campus to give a talk presented by the USU History Department and sponsored by the Tanner Talks Series in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Public radio’s Dr. Zorba Paster is in Logan for several events presented by UPR and he’ll join us for the hour today to talk about healthy living, the latest medical science, and to answer your questions.

http://www.stonehillalumni.org/s/1641/start.aspx

We’ll celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, a day early, with folklorist Lisa Gabbert, who says “Over time, St. Patrick’s Day has become a very American holiday; today, it is largely a festive rite of spring—green being the appropriate spring color—characterized by the performance of “Irishness” through the use of (often stereotyped) symbols.  Many people, not merely those with ancestral connections to Ireland, enjoy “being Irish” for the day, as it is a way to celebrate Irish music and culture, along with better weather.” We’ll ask why is this unofficial holiday so popular in the U.S.

http://www.marketplace.org/topics/health-care

  Republicans in Congress are attempting to keep their long-standing promise to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. They say the ACA is a disaster and likely to implode. Democrats warn that millions of people will lose access to affordable health care if the repeal passes. We’re going to talk about it on Access Utah today. What should our health care system look like? Is healthcare a right? Is the ACA a massive deficit-busting entitlement program? If you prefer a more market-based system how would that work?

http://www.pcta.org/wild/category/wildbook/

Our guest for the hour on Monday’s Access Utah is Cheryl Strayed, author of the #1 New York Times bestselling memoir “Wild,” the New York Times bestsellers “Tiny Beautiful Things” and “Brave Enough,” and the novel “Torch.”

The Oscar-nominated movie adaptation of “Wild” stars Reese Witherspoon as Cheryl and Laura Dern as Cheryl's mother, Bobbi. The film was directed by Jean-Marc Vallée, with a screenplay by Nick Hornby. 

Trinity University Press

Our guest for the hour today is Brooke Williams, author most recently of Open Midnight:

  

https://www.ghostranch.org/instructors/jennifer-sinor/

Jennifer Sinor is the author of Letters Like the Day: On Reading Georgia O'Keeffe, a collection of essays inspired by the letters of the American modernist Georgia O'Keeffe and Ordinary Trauma, a memoir of her military childhood told through linked flash nonfiction. She teaches creative writing at Utah State University where she is a professor of English. She is also the author of The Extraordinary Work of Ordinary Writing: Annie Ray's Diary, a book about the diary of her great, great, great aunt, a woman who homesteaded the Dakotas in the late nineteenth century.

  Natalie Andrews, a Wall Street Journal social media editor and reporter, will give a talk today at USU as a part of the Morris Media & Society Lecture Series, which is facilitated by Utah State’s Department of Journalism and Communication. Here’s how the department describes the talk: “It's now clear that we live in an era of fake news, troll tweets and email dumps. So what does that mean for media, our democracy and our future?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Kristof

On this episode of Access Utah our guest is Pulitzer Prize-Winning New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof. The website for the Half the Sky Movement, founded by Mr. Kristof and his wife Cheryl WuDunn, says: “The central moral challenge of our time is reaching a tipping point.

http://www.communityhealthstrategies.com/

From time to time we gather as a UPR community to compile a book list. On the next Access Utah we’re going to concentrate on Children’s Books. What are you reading to your kids? What are your children reading? What’s your favorite children’s book of all time? How about a new title or something you’ve just discovered that you’d like to share with us?

W. W. Norton & Company

In an era when humans spend much of their time indoors staring at the dim glow of a screen, many of us have forgotten the simple pleasure of a stroll through a wooded glen, a hike up a secluded mountain path, or a nap in the grass. Williams muses, many of us have a dog or go to the beach occasionally. But is that enough?

bookcellarnic.com

  New York, 1888. The miracle of electric light is in its infancy. Thomas Edison has won the race to the patent office and is suing his only remaining rival, George Westinghouse, for the unheard of sum of one billion dollars. To defend himself, Westinghouse makes a surprising choice in his attorney: He hires an untested twenty-six-year-old fresh out of Columbia Law School named Paul Cravath.

http://www.ictsd.org/bridges-news/bridges-africa/news/us-election-world-prepares-for-new-era-following-surprise-trump-win

Faculty of CHaSS present a Panel Discussion: Election 2016 – Opportunities and Challenges for a New Era. Wednesday, February 1 at 4:00 PM, Merrill Cazier Library, room 101. Listen to a lively panel discussion with faculty members from throughout CHaSS: Debra Jenson, Journalism and Communication; Jason Gilmore, Languages, Philosophy and Communication Study; Anna Pechenkina and Damon Cann, Political Science; and Lawrence Culver, History.  Today on Access Utah Jason Gilmore and Lawrence Culver join us in studio to discuss.

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