Access Utah

WBUR

For thousands of years, tracking animals meant following footprints. Now satellites, drones, camera traps, cellphone networks, and accelerometers reveal the natural world as never before. Where the Animals Go offers a comprehensive, data-driven portrait of how creatures like ants, otters, owls, turtles, and sharks navigate the world.

Civilian Reader

Speculative fiction author and social critic Sarah Gailey will give a series of talks and readings in Utah from Oct. 10 to 13 in hopes of emboldening female writers and activists.

The Salt Lake Tribune

Bestselling author Ted Stewart explains how the Supreme Court and its nine appointed members now stand at a crucial point in their power to hand down momentous and far-ranging decisions. Today's Court affects every major area of American life, from health care to civil rights, from abortion to marriage.

 

Academia.edu

Fairy tale expert Jack Zipes says that the tales "serve a meaningful social function, not just for compensation but for revelation: the worlds projected by the best of our fairy tales reveal the gaps between truth and falsehood in our immediate society."

Jack Zipes, a professor emeritus of German and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota, visited USU recently to give a lecture titled “Flying Tales of Wonder: Fairy Tale Postcards as Memes.”

 

 

 

 

 

Patheos

Robert Zellner is a civil rights activist and original Freedom Rider. The Alabama-born son and grandson of Ku Klux Klan members, Zellner has devoted his life to building relationships across color lines. In 1963, he was a young organizer of the March on Washington, which gave us Martin Luther's King "I Have a Dream" speech. He describes his 50-plus year career in the memoir The Wrong Side of Murder Creek: A White Southerner in the Freedom Movement.

Fox News

A gunman opened fire on the crowd at a country music festival in Las Vegas on Sunday evening, killing at least 59 and wounding hundreds.

Wednesday morning at 9:00 a.m. on Access Utah we’ll open the phone lines and invite emails and Tweets as we come together as a UPR community to express our thoughts and feelings and try to come to terms with another senseless tragedy.

We’ll have a couple of guests with us who have Las Vegas ties. And we’d love to know what you’re thinking and feeling.

Vimeo.com

A documentary directed by Jenny Mackenzie

USU Libraries

Opera comes in all shapes and sizes. Considered an elitist art form by many, it is capable of touching souls from pioneers and farmers to apostles and politicians. While it may be an acquired taste, we are lured to it via recitals, concerts, oratorios, and even Broadway musicals and anecdotal tales. 

List Challenges

On our last pledge drive show, we go into the importance of books on Access Utah. We love getting to interview authors and we hope you enjoy listening to these interviews. Ken Sanders from Rare Books and our own Teri Guy join us for the hour to talk about the importance of these book interviews, and encourage your pledges. You will excerpts from some of our favorite book shows, and you can find full interviews for those shows below. Thanks for listening.

Alyssa Roberts

We are continuing our pledge drive this week with more of the best of Access Utah. Today's program has excerpts from our lighter and fun programs. USU assistant professor of English Lynne McNeill, and our own development officer Ted Twinting join us for the hour to encourage your pledges and talk about what makes Access Utah so great. We appreciate your support and hope you have as much fun listening to our show as we have making it. 

American Civil Liberties Union

We continue our fundraising efforts this week with another Best of Access Utah show. Today we focused on our current event shows and emphasized freedom of speech. Associate professor of communication studies at Utah State University Jason Gilmore, and our own Katie Swain join us for the hour to encourage your pledges and discuss the importance of free speech in America. You will hear excerpts from our shows on the Charlottesville Riot, Bears Ears National Monument, and the March For Science. Links to the full shows can be found below. Thanks for listening to Access Utah. 

Utah State University

Wednesday, we are taking pledges and replaying excerpts from some of our best interviews on Access Utah. We appreciate your support not only of us, but of the arts as well. Dr. Craig Jessop, Dean of Utah State University's Caine College of the Arts, and UPR's station manager Peg Arnold join us to discuss the unique importance of the arts. Join us as we revisit our favorite interviews — the best Access Utah has to offer.

The Salt Lake Tribune

From a press release by Native American Voters:

Amazon.com

Everything is subject to a lifecycle. In the field of energy, the obvious question is, “Where are we in the lifecycle of fossil fuels?” Competitive technology for sourcing renewable energy, marketplace readiness, and pressures from climate change all signal that the fossil fuel era is coming to an end. This book explains the alternatives and suggests when and how change will occur.

At twenty years old, Pete Fromm heard of a job babysitting salmon eggs, seven winter months alone in a tent in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness. Leaping at this chance to be a mountain man, with no experience in the wilds, he left the world. Thirteen years later, he published his beloved memoir of that winter, Indian Creek Chronicles ―Into the Wild with a twist.

How did we get here?

In this sweeping, eloquent history of America, Kurt Andersen shows that what’s happening in our country today—this post-factual, “fake news” moment we’re all living through—is not something new, but rather the ultimate expression of our national character. America was founded by wishful dreamers, magical thinkers, and true believers, by hucksters and their suckers. Fantasy is deeply embedded in our DNA.

Drug addiction changes the trajectory of many lives. A drug addict may cycle many times in and out of jail. Families confront the serious dilemma of how best to help their addicted family member. We’re going to talk about an innovation that is showing some promise in helping: drug court. We’ll talk with Judge Thomas Willmore from the Cache Valley Drug Court.

The Banner

What would it be like to see everyone as a friend?

Twelve-year-old Eli D'Angelo has a genetic disorder that obliterates social inhibitions, making him irrepressibly friendly, indiscriminately trusting and unconditionally loving toward everyone he meets. It also makes him enormously vulnerable. 

Author Jennifer Latson follows Eli's story in "The Boy Who Loved Too Much," exploring the boy's coming-of-age as his mother, Gayle, is forced to decide whether to shield Eli entirely from the world or give him the freedom to find his own way. 

Northwestern University Press

Wild Mustard, an anthology of prizewinning short fiction by contemporary Vietnamese writers, throws into relief the transformations of self and place that followed Vietnam’s turn toward a market economy. In just three decades, since the 1986 policy known as doi moi (renovation) ended collectivization and integrated Vietnam into world markets, the country has transformed from one of the poorest and most isolated on earth into a dynamic global economy.

Center for American Progress

 

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has completed the review of national monuments mandated by President Trump. He has not released his recommendations. The New York Times is reporting that those recommendations include reducing the size of 4 national monuments, including Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante in Utah. Reports are that Secretary Zinke may recommend a drastic reduction in size for Bears Ears.

Photo courtesy of Amazon.Com

 

Charlie Huenemann is professor of philosophy at Utah State University. He is the author of several books and essays on the history of philosophy, as well as some fun stuff, such as “How You Play the Game: A Philosopher Plays Minecraft.” We’ll talk about white supremacists’ fascination with Nietzsche and ask if they are misreading the German philosopher. (Huenemann has written a book on Nietzsche).

Family history, usually destined or even designed for limited consumption, is a familiar genre within Mormon culture. Mostly written with little attention to standards of historical scholarship, such works are a distinctly hagiographic form of family memorabilia. But many family sagas in the right hands can prove widely engaging, owing to inherent drama and historical relevance. They can truthfully illuminate larger matters of history, humanity, and culture.

Salt Lake Tribune

We'll discuss the recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia. We’ll ask if there should be any limits to free speech and assembly. What provisions should be made if the protesters are armed? Should ideas repugnant to most people be allowed expression? When such ideas are expressed what should the push-back look like? Is President Trump right to see an equivalence between the protesters and counter-protesters in Charlottesville? Regarding controversial monuments and memorials: How should we make decisions on what stays and what gets removed?

At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor making a living treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. Just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air...

Physics professor, bestselling author, and dynamic storyteller James Kakalios reveals the mind-bending science behind the seemingly basic things that keep our daily lives running, from our smart phones and digital “clouds” to x-ray machines and hybrid vehicles.

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