Science Questions

Fridays at 9:30 a.m.
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We are SQRadio: two women who produce a weekly science radio show for public radio to promote science, technology and science education through stories that move listeners to action, laud innovators and redefine American heroes.

Women Powered Farms on Friday's Access Utah

May 8, 2015
Countryman Press

Welcome to Access Utah.  Small farmers are increasingly women these days.  They are currently raking in roughly 13 billion dollars in produce every year.  Today on the program, Sheri Quinn talks to Audrey Levatino, a female farmer, who left her teaching job to start a small sustainable farm selling cut flowers, pretty much all by herself.  She is the author of "Woman Powered Farm."   

theadaptors.org

On Friday's "Access Utah" we feature an episode from the series "BURN: An Energy Journal" hosted by Alex Chadwick and Flora Lichtman. "The Adaptors" looks at people from all walks of life who are working to counteract energy and climate crises. Adaptors are all around us: farmers and coastal-dwellers finding new ways to work and live; scientists thinking outside the box about energy; corporate leaders bringing new technologies to market; DIY inventors dreaming up the next big thing in green living. These stories provide a window into the essence of who we are as a species - and a measure of hope that we can muster the will to tackle perhaps the biggest challenges we've ever faced. 

Listen to "BURN: An Energy Journal" from "The Adaptors" at www.theadaptors.org

Utah State University/Utah Division of Air Quality

Cache Valley air quality has been getting a lot of attention the last several years.  A few days a year, usually in the wintertime, the air pollution in Logan is worse than most other U.S. cities.  On Friday's AU, Sheri Quinn talks to Utah State University environmental engineer Dr. Randy Martin about his current research on the major air pollution culprit, PM2.5  


sites.psu.edu

Temple Grandin is noted for autism and for her groundbreaking work on many of the nation's slaughterhouses - making them more humane.  She is Professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University and has authored numerous books and papers on autism and agriculture.  On Science Questions, she discusses the latest brain research on autism.  


worldstemcells.com

Science Questions explores imprinted brain theory, which proposes that autism spectrum disorder represents a paternal bias in the expression of imprinted genes.


penguinbooks.co.za

This week on Science Questions intern, Hope Mckinny, talks to Nelson Mandela's former private secretary, Zelda LaGrange, about her new book, a memoir titled "Good Morning Mr. Mandela".  LaGrange offers insight into what being one of the world's most revered individuals was like.

huffingtonpost.com

At 9:30 Science Questions explores marijuana policy through the lens of a theologian.

Recreational marijuana became legal  in the state of Colorado for those 21 and older in 2014.  Washington and others states are preparing to follow suit.  Today on the program we explore the effects, from a theological perspective, that marijuana policies have had on society.  The Reverend Susan Brooks Thistlethwait, Ph. D joins us.

Science Questions Revisits Austism and Genetics

Apr 4, 2014

Today on the program Science Questions presents a two-part program about autism and the brain from cutting edge scientists Temple Grandin and Christopher Badcock. They each approach autism from different disciplines and perspectives and shed new light on the spectrum disorder that is increasingly in the spotlight.  


On Science Questions, producers Sheri Quinn and Suzi Montgomery explore marijuana policies and the long-term effects they have had on the U.S prison system...through the lens of theology from writer Reverend Dr. Susan Thistlewaite.  

Epigenetics on Friday's Science Questions

Mar 21, 2014

Today on the program, Science Questions presents this special on the work of scientist Wolf Reik. He is Professor of Epigenetics at the University of Cambridge and currently studies how additional information can be added to the genome through processes called epigenetics. He made key discoveries that are important for mammalian development, physiology, genome reprogramming, and human diseases. Today producer's Sheri Quinn and Suzi Montgomery explore his work and its significance to the expanding field of epigenetics. 


Today on the program, we talk to former oil industry geologist Marc Deshowitch about the geology of Utah's national parks and the ancient history of oil.  Deshowitch, who is based in St. George, now gives guided tours of Utah's parks and presentations on light pollution and the benefits of preserving our night skies.

Native American Documentarian Sterlin Harjo On Science Questions

Jan 10, 2014

We're taking the science out of SQ Radio program today, and featuring art. Cinematic art to be exact. The Utah Sundance Film Festival begins Jan. 16, and we present filmmaker Sterlin Harjo from Holdenville, Okla.

In 2006, Harjo was the youngest and first Native American to receive the United States Artist Fellowship.

Harjo joins SQ Radio to discuss his documentary film premiering at the Sundance Film Festival titled, "This May Be The Last Time."

Exploring Fire on Science Questions

Nov 8, 2013
powdermag.com

Science Questions explores the phenomena of fire. Sheri Quinn covers two different stories about fire, from two very different people: A scientists and a writer. Tune into to hear how fire changes science, ecosystems and human energy. 

The Colorado River on Friday's Access Utah

Nov 1, 2013
wildnatureimages.com

Today on Access Utah, Jack Schmidt, professor in Utah State University’s Department of Watershed Sciences and head of the U.S. Geological Survey's Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, has long studied the Colorado River. He's among the team of scientists that designed a series of controlled releases of water from Glen Canyon Dam, starting in 1996, in an effort to restore habitats altered by the use of dams. 

   

The Paleo Diet Explored on Science Questions

Oct 18, 2013

Science Questions explores the Paleo Diet that has swept the nation in recent years.  The diet promotes eating like a hunter gatherer, which means cutting out most breads, dairy and processed foods.  


businessinsider.com

Science Questions explores the recent Colorado flood with author Laura Pritchett.  She watched and listened to the flood from her Colorado home and observed the aftermath that included thousands of gallons of fracking fluid leaking into the rivers.  She recalls her shocking experiences writing about the disaster, after seeing the damage from an airplane.


Health and Air Pollution on Friday's Access Utah

Oct 11, 2013
hjnews.com

Cache Valley has some of the worst air in the nation a few days out of the year, typically in the winter time.  Even short-term exposure to air pollution can cause long-term health effects according to studies conducted at Utah State University.  Today on the program, Utah State University toxicologist Dr. Roger Coloumbe joins us to discuss the Cache Valley air pollution studies and how it impacts our health. 

This program originally aired June 5th 2013.

The most famous person with autism, Temple Grandin, has a new book out called The Autistic Brain-Thinking Across the Spectrum, and it is currently number 21 on the best seller list. On the program, producer Sheri Quinn presents this two-part program on autism.  In the first half, Temple Grandin talks about the book, her latest research in the livestock industry, and what she thinks parents, clinicians, and educators should be doing to improve the lives of children with autism.

Climate Change Explored by Native Alaskan Culture

Sep 20, 2013
climateavenue.com

Temperatures in the Arctic are warming twice as fast as any other place on the planet. Science Questions takes us behind the scenes of this week’s PBS NEWSHOUR report: Climate Change- Arctic Thaw, a three part series chronicling the cascading effects of climate change on the environment and lifestyle of the Native Alaskans, The Eskimos. 


gardensproject.org

There is a sustainability movement blossoming across thee Unites States, and it's community supported agricultural farms are an incredible result of the trend over the past decade. Utah State University Naturalist Roslynn Brain shares Utah's efforts towards a more sustainable future and how you can eat your way to a smaller carbon footprint.

Our Earth is warming. Earth's average temperature has risen by 1.4 degrees farenheit over the past century, and is projected to rise another 2 to 11.5 degrees over the next hundred years, according to the U.S Environmental Protection Agency. Small changes in the average temperature of the planet can cause potentially dangerous shifts in climate and weather. Humans are largely responsible.

Science Questions explores global population and environmental health. Our planet has reached a milestone: In 2011, the world population reached 7 billion people and by the end of the century, it will top 10 billion. Unsustainable human population growth and over consumption are driving species extinct, and destroying wildlife habitat.


Hope for Stopping the spread of Melanoma

Jun 21, 2013

  Researchers at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City have identified a key protein with a role in the metastasis of melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer.  Today on the program, Dr. Allie Grossman, the lead author of the study published in the online journal, Science Signaling, joins us to talk about the finding that offers hope in stopping melanoma from spreading in the body.  


Plants in Prison and Racing on Access Utah Friday

Jun 14, 2013

  Two Cache Valley women are giving Utah prisoners a new chance behind bars and beyond.  Their tool is a dried plant.  Today on the program, producers Sheri Quinn and Elaine Taylor explore the "plants in jail" program started by Sara Lamb and Mary Barkworth, where inmates glue plant material onto archival paper for the Utah State University Herbarium.  

  Last year, agricultural producers experienced the worst drought in generations. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack announced this week the department's vision for agriculture in the face of evolving environmental challenges.  Today on the program, Sheri Quinn talks to USDA spokesperson Blake Walbeck about the challenges ahead for farmers and ranchers in Utah and discusses conservation stewardship funding available to producers in Utah and nationwide. 


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