Science Questions

Fridays at 9:30 a.m.

We are SQRadio: two women who produce a weekly science radio show for public radio to promote science, technology and science education through stories that move listeners to action, laud innovators and redefine American heroes.

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Science Questions explores imprinted brain theory, which proposes that autism spectrum disorder represents a paternal bias in the expression of imprinted genes.


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This week on Science Questions intern, Hope Mckinny, talks to Nelson Mandela's former private secretary, Zelda LaGrange, about her new book, a memoir titled "Good Morning Mr. Mandela".  LaGrange offers insight into what being one of the world's most revered individuals was like.

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At 9:30 Science Questions explores marijuana policy through the lens of a theologian.

Recreational marijuana became legal  in the state of Colorado for those 21 and older in 2014.  Washington and others states are preparing to follow suit.  Today on the program we explore the effects, from a theological perspective, that marijuana policies have had on society.  The Reverend Susan Brooks Thistlethwait, Ph. D joins us.

Today on the program Science Questions presents a two-part program about autism and the brain from cutting edge scientists Temple Grandin and Christopher Badcock. They each approach autism from different disciplines and perspectives and shed new light on the spectrum disorder that is increasingly in the spotlight.  


On Science Questions, producers Sheri Quinn and Suzi Montgomery explore marijuana policies and the long-term effects they have had on the U.S prison system...through the lens of theology from writer Reverend Dr. Susan Thistlewaite.  

Today on the program, Science Questions presents this special on the work of scientist Wolf Reik. He is Professor of Epigenetics at the University of Cambridge and currently studies how additional information can be added to the genome through processes called epigenetics. He made key discoveries that are important for mammalian development, physiology, genome reprogramming, and human diseases. Today producer's Sheri Quinn and Suzi Montgomery explore his work and its significance to the expanding field of epigenetics. 


Today on the program, we talk to former oil industry geologist Marc Deshowitch about the geology of Utah's national parks and the ancient history of oil.  Deshowitch, who is based in St. George, now gives guided tours of Utah's parks and presentations on light pollution and the benefits of preserving our night skies.

We're taking the science out of SQ Radio program today, and featuring art. Cinematic art to be exact. The Utah Sundance Film Festival begins Jan. 16, and we present filmmaker Sterlin Harjo from Holdenville, Okla.

In 2006, Harjo was the youngest and first Native American to receive the United States Artist Fellowship.

Harjo joins SQ Radio to discuss his documentary film premiering at the Sundance Film Festival titled, "This May Be The Last Time."

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Science Questions explores the phenomena of fire. Sheri Quinn covers two different stories about fire, from two very different people: A scientists and a writer. Tune into to hear how fire changes science, ecosystems and human energy. 

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Today on Access Utah, Jack Schmidt, professor in Utah State University’s Department of Watershed Sciences and head of the U.S. Geological Survey's Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, has long studied the Colorado River. He's among the team of scientists that designed a series of controlled releases of water from Glen Canyon Dam, starting in 1996, in an effort to restore habitats altered by the use of dams. 

   

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