All Things Considered

Weekdays 4:00 - 7:00 p.m.
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by more than 11 million people on over 600 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. Andrea Seabrook hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

More information at All Things Considered.

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The Two-Way
4:44 pm
Mon February 6, 2012

Remembering Roger Boisjoly: He Tried To Stop Shuttle Challenger Launch

Engineer Roger Boisjoly examines a model of the O-Rings, used to bring the Space Shuttle into orbit, at a meeting of senior executives and academic representatives in Rye, New York in Sept. 1991.
AP

Roger Boisjoly was a booster rocket engineer at NASA contractor Morton Thiokol in Utah in January, 1986, when he and four colleagues became embroiled in the fatal decision to launch the Space Shuttle Challenger.

Boisjoly was also one of two confidential sources quoted by NPR three weeks later in the first detailed report about the Challenger launch decision, and the stiff resistance by Boisjoly and other Thiokol engineers.

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NPR Story
3:59 pm
Mon February 6, 2012

'Coming Apart': Greatest Inequality in America Is Cultural

Robert Siegel talks to Charles Murray about his book, "Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010." Murray says the greatest source of inequality in America isn't economic, it's cultural. He contends that a large swath of white America — poor and working-class whites, who make up approximately 30-percent of the white population — is turning away from the core values that have sustained the American experiment.

Author Interviews
2:33 pm
Mon February 6, 2012

Is White, Working Class America 'Coming Apart'?

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 5:33 pm

According to the libertarian social scientist Charles Murray, America is "coming apart at the seams." Class strain has cleaved society into two groups, he argues in his new book Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010: an upper class, defined by educational attainment, and a new lower class, characterized by the lack of it. Murray also posits that the new "lower class" is less industrious, less likely to marry and raise children in a two-parent household, and more politically and socially disengaged

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Deceptive Cadence
1:34 pm
Mon February 6, 2012

Violinist Anne Akiko Meyers: From Playing In Knee Socks To Owning Two Strads

Violinist Anne Akiko Meyers.
Lisa-Marie Mazzucco courtesy of the artist

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Music
3:00 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

New Staging Of 'Yentl' Tells A Transgender Girl's Story

Actress Hillary Clemens portrays Yentl/Anshel in the new staging of Isaac Bashevis Singer's play at the Asolo Repertory Theatre in Sarasota, Fla.
Daniel Perales Studio

Singer-songwriter Jill Sobule is probably best known for her 1995 hit single, "I Kissed a Girl." These days, she's taking on a new musical project: the gender-bending play by Isaac Bashevis Singer, Yentl.

Barbra Streisand turned Singer's play into her 1984 hit movie musical of the same name. Although Sobule's version features music, it's a little more Singer and a little less Streisand.

"She changed the ending and made it kind of Funny Girl coming to America. ... We keep to the word," Sobule tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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Author Interviews
1:10 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

How Whitey Bulger Corrupted The Justice System

These 1984 file photos originally released by the FBI show New England organized crime figure James "Whitey" Bulger.
Federal Bureau of Investigation, File AP

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 11:32 am

When Whitey Bulger was captured last year, he'd spent close to 20 years on the run — and on the FBI's Most Wanted list.

Bulger was the head of an Irish gang terrorizing the streets of South Boston. The Massachusetts State Police wanted him gone, but curiously couldn't touch him.

Why? Bulger was a confidential FBI informant, and the bureau shielded him for years.

Robert Fitzpatrick, the author of Betrayal: Whitey Bulger and the FBI Agent Who Fought to Bring Him Down, says Bulger was widely known to be an unsavory character.

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Around the Nation
3:17 pm
Sat February 4, 2012

Lost Malcolm X Speech Heard Again 50 Years Later

Richard Holbrooke and Katharine Pierce as students in 1961 at Brown University.
Katharine Pierce

Originally published on Sat February 4, 2012 3:57 pm

Last semester, Brown senior Malcolm Burnley took a narrative writing course. One of the assignments was to write a fictional story based on something true — and that true event had to be found inside the university archives.

"So I went to the archives and started flipping through dusty compilations of student newspapers, and there was this old black-and-white photo of when Malcolm X came to speak," Burnley says. "There was one short article that corresponded to it, and very little else."

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Sat February 4, 2012

In Nev., Solid Showing Expected For Romney

Originally published on Sat February 4, 2012 3:57 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Republican voters in Nevada have begun caucusing. It's the first state in the West to weigh in on the presidential nominating contest. And as we mentioned earlier, Mitt Romney is the overwhelming favorite to win. Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul have also been campaigning in the state. Rick Santorum is looking ahead to contests in the Midwest next week.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Sat February 4, 2012

Russia, China Veto UN Resolution On Syria

The U.N. Security Council failed again Saturday to take decisive action to stop the escalating violence in Syria as Russia and China vetoed a resolution backing an Arab League plan that calls for President Bashar Assad to step down. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports the veto drew intense criticism from the U.S.

World
1:00 pm
Sat February 4, 2012

Tens Of Thousands Protest Russia's Putin

Originally published on Sat February 4, 2012 3:57 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Turning now to Russia. In Moscow, tens of thousands of people took to the streets today in dueling demonstrations for and against the government of Prime Minister Vladimir Putin. Putin is seeking to return to the presidency in next month's elections.

NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from the Russian capital.

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