Access Utah

Weekdays 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

Access Utah is UPR's original program focusing on the things that matter to Utah. The hour-long show airs daily at 9:00 a.m. and covers everything from pets to politics in a range of formats from in-depth interviews to call-in shows.

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Tracking the Coyote

Apr 6, 2012

The clown, the hero, the fool, the sacred one...the coyote plays a number of roles including the most abundant predator in North America. Tracking the coyote takes us on a thorny trail filled with political, ethical and environmental strife that forces us to confront the human struggle for power over nature. Science Questions presents this controversial canine and its perseverance in the West.

Thursday on Access Utah, we rebroadcast Tom Williams' interview from last year with Liz Murray, who was born to drug-addicted parents, lived as a homeless teen, then won a New York Times scholarship and went to Harvard. Her memoir is called Breaking Night: A Memoir of Forgiveness, and my Journey from Homelessness to Harvard.

On Wednesday’s Access Utah, it’s time for our annual March tradition: an hour of great Bossa Nova music, live from Studio C with the ensemble “Evening in Brazil.”  We’ll hear songs of Antonio Carlos Jobim and other composers.

Carter Niemeyer used to trap wolves and now does everything he can to protect them. Tom Williams talks to Niemeyer, retired U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  wolf recovery coordinator for Idaho and author of Wolfer: a Memoir on Access Utah Tuesday.

The garden is warming up! Apricot blossoms have popped and asparagus is breaking through the ground. Dan Drost, Vegetable Specialist with USU's extension program, is in the studio to answer any gardening questions you might have.

Electric roads could power cars in the near future. Today, on Access Utah, we re-broadcast our episode on the international Electric Roads and Vehicles Conference, held in Park City last month.

At 9:30 Science Questions takes a comprehensive look at what's called the "Paleo Diet", a way of eating that mimics diets of our hunter-gatherer ancestors: lean meats, seafood, vegetables, fruits, and nuts.

I work on problems of water rights and water policy at the intersection of law, geography, and political economy.

 

Dr. Carl Bauer, Professor of Geography at the University of Arizona, is our guest on Access Utah Thursday in anticipation of a talk he'll give as Distinguished Geographer Lecturer at Utah State University in the evening. Bauer is an expert on water rights and water policy and specializes in the similar coasts of Chile and California and the roles of water and law in the policies of those regions.

Ambassador Peter Tomsen was the special envoy to Afghan resistance leaders from 1989 to 1992 under President George H.W. Bush. He's the author of The Wars of Afghanistan: Messianic Terrorism, Tribal Conflicts, and the Failures of Great Powers in addition to being a guest on the Daily Show with John Stewart. Tom Williams will go for a more in-depth interview with Tomsen on Wednesday's Access Utah. We welcome your phone calls, emails, and comments below.

Our topic on Access Utah for Tuesday is religion in America. We'll specifically be talking about homegrown religions, like Mormonism, Seventh-Day Adventists, and Jehovah's Witnesses, that have their roots in the U.S. Our guest is historian Richard Bushman, a renowned expert in Mormon history and Mormon Studies and recent guest lecturer at the Utah State University campus.

We'll talk about the implications of the early spring that about to be in full swing in Utah. Our guest for the hour is Brent Black, USU Extension fruit specialist. He'll talk about pest management plans, pruning, and other preparations for the stressful bloom period that's just around the corner.

Click here to learn about the frost-tolerance of your fruit buds.

The Mayflower was the ship that in 1620 transported the pilgrims from Plymouth, England to Plymouth Massachusetts.  Using genealogical records two anthropologists are tracing the life history and migration of these early first settlers. Today on the program they discuss the surprising details of their journey and what they can reveal about ourselves today.

Into the Current

The film, Into the Current, deepens the understanding of the political issues happening in Burma. A former political prisoner, Ko Bo Kyi, is featured in the film and is our guest on Access Utah along with the film's director and producer, Jeanne Hallacy.

This Light of Ours

Our topic Wednesday is homelessness.  Tom Williams’ guests will include Pamela Atkinson, a leading advocate for Utah’s homeless, and Leon Anderson, Head of the Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology at Utah State University and coauthor of Down on Their Luck: A Study of Homeless Street People.  He’ll give the Timepiece titled: “Criminalization of Mental Illness and the Promise of Mental Health Courts” at USU's College of Humanities and Social Sciences’ Kiger Hour on Thursday in Logan.

On Tuesday's Access Utah, Tom Williams talks with Gretchen Morgenson, author of Reckless Endangerment: How Outsized Ambition, Greed, and Corruption led to Economic Armageddon. Morgenson is a Pulitzer-Prize-winning writer and business reporter and financial editor for The New York Times.  Her book sheds light on the darkest corners of Washington and Wall Street and helps explain how those who were supposed to protect the U.S. from financial harm were in fact responsible for the country's economic implosion.

Leafy greens are a staple of any garden and now is the time to plant them ...even under 4 inches of snow like we have in Cache Valley. Mark Anderson from Anderson Seed & Garden in Logan is in the studio the whole hour.

90% of the world's large fish are gone due to over-consumption of seafood and by 2048 all ocean fish could be extinct if the world continues to consume at this rate. On Access Utah today, Sheri Quinn talks to Michael Sutton, Vice President of the Monterrey Bay Aquarium, about this global problem.

Part 3 of Science Questions' series on epigenetics is in the second half.

On Thursday's Access Utah we’ll feature a debate on HB187 which would ban photographing farm operations without permission or under false pretenses. Proponents say it provides needed protections to farm operations and opponents say this is a thinly-veiled attempt to prevent needed public scrutiny. Guests will include Nathan Runkle of Mercy for Animals and Randy Parker of the Utah Farm Bureau.

We welcome your emails, comments and calls during our debate.

Our guest on Access Utah Wednesday is Tom Donaldson, an oft-consulted expert in the field of business ethics. Professor Donaldson is the director of the Zicklin center for Business Ethics Research at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and a founding member of the Society for Business Ethics. He is author of Ties That Bind: A Social Contract Approach to Business Ethics in addition to several other titles. He was recently a guest to the Hunstman School of Business at Utah State University. Tom Williams talks with him about...well, business ethics, what else?

Today on Access Utah we talk about the caucus system: how it works and why it's important to participate. Tom Williams' guests include Deseret News columnists, Frank Pignanelli and LaVarr Webb; Kirk Jowers, Political Science professor at University of Utah; Damon Cann, Political Science Professor at Utah State University; Republican Chairman Thomas Wright; and John Harris, co-founder and editor-in-chief at Politico.

More information on the Utah Caucuses is at vote.utah.gov.

The delayed dormant oil spray is one of the most important things you can do to effectively eliminate bothersome insect pests on your fruit trees. Diane Alston, USU Extension Entomologist, explains this spray and it’s timing along with answering many listen questions from throughout the state.

We'll recap everything that happened over the past 45 days in the Utah Legislature today on Access Utah.

Tom Williams will talk to lawmakers and lobbyists about what Ross Romero called the "busy but boring" session. A lot happened but how will it change Utah?

If you have a question or comment for our guests, send us an email, comment below or give us a call.

Thursday's Access Utah will be live from Ogden in preparation of our celebration of NPR's From the Top paying Utah a visit.

In the first half Tom Williams will be joined by From the Top host Christopher O'Riley and the show's co-founding executive producer, Gerald Slavit. We'll also hear from Trenton Chang, a young pianist from Logan, Utah.

Today on Access Utah, directors Don Argott and Sheena Joyce talk to Sheri Quinn about their 2012 documentary film, Atomic States of America, which premiered this year at Sundance. The film captures both the history of nuclear energy and the potentially looming disaster at our aging sites.

At 9:30 Science Questions presents Part 2 of the series we started last week about Epigenetics: The New Frontier in Science and Medicine. Today's episode explores current research on the origins of mental illness through the lens of epigenetic science.

KUED premieres a new documentary series “Utah Vietnam War Stories” next Monday, March 12,  and on Access Utah we talk with the producers, Elizabeth Searles and Ken Verdoia, and with two Utah Vietnam veterans, Jerry Cannon and Stu Shipley.

In the last segment, we talk about veterans of America’s current wars with Matthew LaPlante, USU Assistant Professor, Department of Journalism and Communication; Terry Schow, Executive Director, Utah Department of Veteran Affairs; and Jill Atwood-Public Information Officer, Utah Department of Veteran Affairs.

Lettuce and lovage. No, not the play, but on Access Utah. Dan Drost, USU Extension Vegetable Specialist, discusses leafy greens, onions, and artichokes.

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