Access Utah

Weekdays 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

Access Utah is UPR's original program focusing on the things that matter to Utah. The hour-long show airs daily at 9:00 a.m. and covers everything from pets to politics in a range of formats from in-depth interviews to call-in shows.

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Today on Access Utah we talk about the caucus system: how it works and why it's important to participate. Tom Williams' guests include Deseret News columnists, Frank Pignanelli and LaVarr Webb; Kirk Jowers, Political Science professor at University of Utah; Damon Cann, Political Science Professor at Utah State University; Republican Chairman Thomas Wright; and John Harris, co-founder and editor-in-chief at Politico.

More information on the Utah Caucuses is at vote.utah.gov.

The delayed dormant oil spray is one of the most important things you can do to effectively eliminate bothersome insect pests on your fruit trees. Diane Alston, USU Extension Entomologist, explains this spray and it’s timing along with answering many listen questions from throughout the state.

We'll recap everything that happened over the past 45 days in the Utah Legislature today on Access Utah.

Tom Williams will talk to lawmakers and lobbyists about what Ross Romero called the "busy but boring" session. A lot happened but how will it change Utah?

If you have a question or comment for our guests, send us an email, comment below or give us a call.

Thursday's Access Utah will be live from Ogden in preparation of our celebration of NPR's From the Top paying Utah a visit.

In the first half Tom Williams will be joined by From the Top host Christopher O'Riley and the show's co-founding executive producer, Gerald Slavit. We'll also hear from Trenton Chang, a young pianist from Logan, Utah.

Today on Access Utah, directors Don Argott and Sheena Joyce talk to Sheri Quinn about their 2012 documentary film, Atomic States of America, which premiered this year at Sundance. The film captures both the history of nuclear energy and the potentially looming disaster at our aging sites.

At 9:30 Science Questions presents Part 2 of the series we started last week about Epigenetics: The New Frontier in Science and Medicine. Today's episode explores current research on the origins of mental illness through the lens of epigenetic science.

KUED premieres a new documentary series “Utah Vietnam War Stories” next Monday, March 12,  and on Access Utah we talk with the producers, Elizabeth Searles and Ken Verdoia, and with two Utah Vietnam veterans, Jerry Cannon and Stu Shipley.

In the last segment, we talk about veterans of America’s current wars with Matthew LaPlante, USU Assistant Professor, Department of Journalism and Communication; Terry Schow, Executive Director, Utah Department of Veteran Affairs; and Jill Atwood-Public Information Officer, Utah Department of Veteran Affairs.

Lettuce and lovage. No, not the play, but on Access Utah. Dan Drost, USU Extension Vegetable Specialist, discusses leafy greens, onions, and artichokes.

On Access Utah this morning we hear from biologist Robert Rockwell from the American Museum of Natural History about his work in the Arctic tundra and his current research on the impact of global climate change and its effect on the interaction of species in that region and beyond.

At 9:30, on Science Questions we hear from Randy Jirtle, a scientist dedicated to the resurgence of the field of epigenetics and its implications for the future of biology and medicine.

Thursday on Access Utah, a discussion on Medieval art with renowned scholar Jaroslav Folda, and a conversation with Sheryl WuDunn, co-author of Half The Sky, a book-turned-movement empowering women around the world to fight poverty and extremism.

Wednesday on Access Utah, Tom Williams moderates a discussion between proponents and opponents of Utah signing the Health Care Compact, which would move health care services away from the federal government to be managed by individual states. Our guests are Danny Harris of Utah AARP, Jason Cook of the Utah Health Policy Project, Stan Rasmussen of the Sutherland Institute, and Don Ruzicka of the Eagle Forum.

Lee Austin moderates a discussion about HB 363, known as the "Sex Ed Bill", with Representatives Brian King and Patrice Arent, KCPW reporter Jessica Gail, Matt Piccolo from the Sutherland Institute, and Dawn Davies of the Utah PTA.

Join the discussion. Send us an Email, Post a Comment below, or Call in During the Show.

The Bugs are Waking Up

Feb 27, 2012

This morning's gardening program originally aired in February 2011. Spring is almost here and the bugs are starting to stir, so Diane Allston, entomologist from Utah State University's Extension Program joins us for the full hour.

More information at http://utahpests.usu.edu/ipm/

Today, the very personal story of one man's battle with pancreatic cancer and new research from USTAR scientists, working around-the-clock to design a cancer screening device that will provide early diagnosis of the disease.

At 9:30 Science Questions profiles the world's largest international gem fair in Tuscon, Arizona -- a bustling marketplace where meteorites, trilobites, and rare gems are showcased.

Frederick Kempe, author of the bestseller, Berlin 1961: Kennedy, Khrushchev and the Most Dangerous Place on Earth, will be our guest for the hour on Thursday’s Access Utah.  

Air Quality is the topic of Wednesday’s Access Utah. In the first half we’ll talk with Dr. Brian Moench, President of Utah Physicians for Healthy Environment; Cherise Udell, Founder and President of Utah Moms for Clean Air; and Matt Pacenza, Policy Director for HEAL Utah. In the second half our guests will include Tom Bingham, President of the Utah Manufacturers Association; and Jim Holtkamp, a Board Member with the Utah Mining Association.

Immigration in Utah

Feb 21, 2012

Immigration legislation has been in the news lately in Utah and that's our topic on Access Utah today. In the first half we welcome Bishop John Wester of the Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake City and Chairman of the U. S. Conference of Bishops’ Committee on Migration. Our guest in the second half is Eli Cawley from the Utah Minuteman Project.

Electricity is the future of transportation according to engineers at the Electric Roads and Vehicles Conference in Park City, Utah, today. Presenter John Boys, Professor of Electronics at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, pioneered the technology called "inductive power transfer" that allows vehicles to receive electric power from roads, doing away with the need to fuel up or plug in. With escalating gas prices Boys says we need an alternative to keep our cities moving.

At 9:30 Science Questions Explores what's in your school lunch.

Utah’s Government Records Access and Management Act, or GRAMA, was a hotly-debated issue at last year’s legislative session. News organizations say Utahns still need to pay attention to the issue. The Utah Media Coalition has launched Grama Watch, which, it says, is an effort to keep a public eye on pending legislation that may have an effect on the openness of Utah government.

Today on Access Utah a conversation on higher education in Utah with members of the stat legislature. We'll discuss enrollment, tenure, budget, tuition and more with Representative Joel Briscoe and Senator Casey Anderson.

Some of Utah's veterans were honored in the legislature yesterday, including Representative Patrice Arent's father. In the last segment of the show today, Marvin Arent tells Tom Williams why he disobeyed direct orders in WWII and saved lives as a result.

All About Pruning

Feb 13, 2012

Today on our weekly gardening episode of Access Utah, Brent Black, USU extension fruit specialist, joins us for the whole hour to talk about how to make your fruit trees more fruitful when fruiting time comes again

In the first half today, we replay a conversation with John McDowell from last year. His book, Poetry and Violence: The Ballad Tradition of Mexico's Costa Chica, examines the question whether or not art that portrays violence, promotes violence.

In the second half Tom Williams talks with Senators Aaron Osmond and Karen Morgan about K-12 education and what's going on in the current state legislative session.

On Wednesday’s Access Utah we’ll discuss writing the stories of our lives, and the book, One World, Many Stories - Seeking Freedom and Dignity, Experiences of Utah residents, which was published recently as a community outreach project of the Utah Chapter of the Association of Personal Historians.

Tom Williams’ guests include Paulette Stevens (editor of the book and member of the Utah APH,) Tom Taylor (member of the Utah APH,) Sheryl Allen, and Rozina Bahlibi, all of whom tell their stories in the book.

Police say Josh Powell killed himself and his two sons over the weekend.  Susan Cox Powell remains missing.

There's plenty to talk about today on Access Utah's gardening segment. For instance, growing your own celery: it tastes better than store bought celery but you have to start it early. Dan Drost from Utah State University's Extension is with us for the whole hour to discuss what needs to be done now for Utah gardeners.

One of the first African American fighter pilots, Lieutenant Colonel James Harvey III, was honored Thursday at Hill Air Force Base. On Access Utah today, we join the celebration in action at the Air Force Base Museum, where the Colonel gave his inspirational speech about the first group of African Americans to fight in World War II, the Tuskegee Airmen.

At 9:30 Science Questions explores the biology of aggression and new research showing the social and physical environment has a lot of influence in sculpting our human genome.
 

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