Access Utah

Weekdays 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

Access Utah is UPR's original program focusing on the things that matter to Utah. The hour-long show airs daily at 9:00 a.m. and covers everything from pets to politics in a range of formats from in-depth interviews to call-in shows.

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Access Utah
11:39 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Rock Climber and Sky Diver, Steph Davis, on Friday's Access Utah

Moab resident Steph Davis is a superstar in the climbing community. But when her husband made a controversial climb of Delicate Arch, the media fallout and the toll on her marriage left her without a partner or an income. Accompanied by her beloved dog, Fletch, she set off in search of a new identity and discovered sky diving. Though falling out of an airplane is antithetical to a climber’s control, she discovered new hope and joy in letting go.

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Access Utah
11:01 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Cronkite Biography on Thursday's Access Utah

For decades, Walter Cronkite was known as "the most trusted man in America." Millions across the nation welcomed him into their homes, first as a print reporter for the United Press on the front lines of World War II, and  later, in the emerging medium of television, as a host of numerous documentary programs and as anchor of the CBS Evening News, from 1962 until his retirement in 1981.

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Access Utah
10:50 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Challenges and Revelations of Autism from Utah Film maker on Wednesday's Access Utah

A mother talks about the gap between when her son is seen as "normal," and when he's seen as "not normal."  She's talking about his invisible disability - a disability which at first glance isn't readily apparent, and includes intellectual impairments such as autism. Given the misperceptions and mistaken judgments people with invisible disabilities frequently encounter, a film, “Invisible Disabilities:

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Access Utah
4:26 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Genetically Modified Foods on Monday's Access Utah

Credit bilaterals.com

Are GMOs or Genetically Modified Organisms beneficial or dangerous to global health? Are GMOs critical to sustainability or a danger to the environment? Should companies have the right to patent seeds? Can GMOs co-exist with organic farming? We’ll seek answers to your GMO questions from Jennifer Reeve, USU Associate Professor of Organic and Sustainable Agriculture; David Hole, USU Professor of Plant Breeding/Genetics; and Amelia Smith Rinehart, U of U Associate Professor of Law.  You can join the discussion by email or on our Utah Public Radio Facebook page.

 

Access Utah
1:10 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Air Quality & Climate Change from Vernal on Tuesday's Access Utah

Credit galleristny.com

Eastern Utah’s Uintah Basin has seen sharp increase in economic development in recent years with oil and gas extraction leading the way. Uintah County has grown by 29% in the last decade. With this growth has come an increasing air quality problem. A coalition of public health and conservation groups sued the Environmental Protection Agency last year, saying the agency is failing to protect the Uintah Basin from high levels of air pollution. Can industry and cars coexist with good air? Do we face a choice between jobs and a healthy environment? And what about climate change? Is oil and gas extraction in eastern Utah contributing to climate change? What can and should be done?

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Access Utah
1:10 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Restorative Justice on Monday's Access Utah

Credit cetconnect.org

Young people in the United States are entering the youth justice system in shocking numbers, and many seem to come out worse than when they went in. More than half of incarcerated kids are likely to re-commit crimes after being released. Some wonder whether exposure to the system itself could be perpetuating a life of crime. On the other side of the world, a New Zealand youth court has incorporated restorative principles of justice adapted from Maori culture, bringing victims and offenders together to resolve disputes. In Maori history, a crime put the community out of balance. Traditional Maori justice seeks to restore that balance. Focusing on rehabilitation more than punishment, New Zealand has seen great success and set a precedent for youth justice around the world.


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Access Utah
11:23 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Utah Rural Summit on Friday's Access Utah

Credit www.usu.edu

For two days each year in August, county, municipal and state leaders and other stake holders gather in Cedar City for the Utah Rural Summit. They come from throughout Utah to explore issues that impact rural life, to hear from experts the latest information pertaining to rural life, and to discuss policies necessary to maintain and expand the political, cultural and economic relevance of rural communities. UPR's Southern Utah Correspondent Chris Holmes reports from the summit on its second day.


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Access Utah
3:55 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

A Farm Daughter's Lament on Wednesday's Access Utah

Credit pagesofjulia.com

Thomas Jefferson called farmers “the chosen people of God” and claimed that they were inherently virtuous, the best citizens for the new republic. Evelyn Funda, author of “Weeds: A Farm Daughter’s Lament,” says that “the American imagination has endowed farming with profound and enduring symbolic significance. ...no other occupation —with perhaps the exception of motherhood—so fully spans the imaginative range of human experience or is so profoundly invested with symbolic significance in our culture, even by those who have never worked or lived on a farm.” In Jefferson’s day, 90 percent of the population worked on family farms. Today, in a world dominated by agribusiness, less than 1 percent of Americans claim farm-related occupations. What was lost along the way is something that Funda experienced firsthand when, in 2001, her parents sold the last parcel of the farm they had worked since they married in 1957.

 

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Access Utah
5:05 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Reduce Your Risk of Alzheimer's on Tuesday's Access Utah

Credit uhipnj.org

Has Alzheimer’s Disease has touched your family? There are 50,000 Utahns affected by Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and Utah has the nation’s highest growth rate of AD (127%). There are more than 5 million cases of AD in the US today and by 2050, that number is expected to nearly triple to 13.8 million and care costs will reach over $1.2 trillion. There is no known cure and the impact on afflicted individuals and their families is devastating. The AD process may begin decades before diagnosis. But Maria Norton, USU Associate Professor of Family Consumer and Human Development, says that while there are some factors we are born with (e.g. genes) that can't be modified, there are a host of factors that have been shown to affect our risk for Alzheimer’s that ARE modifiable, and if we can encourage individuals, families and communities to adopt healthy lifestyle habits, we may be able to make a "course correction" to avoid or at least delay AD as individuals, and as a society.

 

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Access Utah
11:46 am
Sat August 3, 2013

It's Even Worse Than It Looks on Monday's Access Utah

Credit npr.org

What caused the dysfunction in Washington? What has changed, if anything, since the 2012 elections? What we can learn from recent Utah political developments, including the defeat of Senator Bob Bennett and re-election of Senator Orrin Hatch? What should we do to fix our political system? The book by Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein: “It’s Even Worse than It Looks--How the American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism” caused quite a stir when it was published last year. Mann and Ornstein said that the dysfunction in our government is the result of a mismatch between increasingly parliamentary-style parties and our constitutional separation of powers.

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