Access Utah

Weekdays 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

Access Utah is UPR's original program focusing on the things that matter to Utah. The hour-long show airs daily at 9:00 a.m. and covers everything from pets to politics in a range of formats from in-depth interviews to call-in shows. Email us at upraccess@gmail.com or call at 1-800-826-1495.

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Club Runner

In the first half today, a conversation with Utah State University President, Noelle Cockett. We’ll talk about issues in higher education, including sexual assault on campus, immigration, and a recent controversial donation to USU from the Charles Koch Foundation.

Philly.com

Both George Orwell and Winston Churchill came close to death in the mid-1930's—Orwell shot in the neck in a trench line in the Spanish Civil War, and Churchill struck by a car in New York City. If they'd died then, history would scarcely remember them. At the time, Churchill was a politician on the outs, his loyalty to his class and party suspect. Orwell was a mildly successful novelist, to put it generously.

Utah State University

  

"Remember that you will die..." 

On today's spooky edition of Access Utah, we talked with some of Utah State University's foremost experts on the history, art and tradition of death. 

A new online exhibit sponsored by the USU's University Libraries "traces the thematic iconographies of death, dying and mourning."

Titled "Memento Mori," Latin for "Remember that you will die," the exhibit shows how symbols of death and the afterlife became dominant in art with the dawn of western Christianity. 

Roosevelt House

A new sexual revolution is sweeping the country, and college students are on the front lines. Women use fresh, smart methods to fight entrenched sexism and sexual assault even as they celebrate their own sexuality as never before. Many “woke” male students are more sensitive to women’s concerns than previous generations ever were, while other men perpetuate the most cruel misogyny. Amid such apparent contradictions, it’s no surprise that intense confusion shrouds the topic of sex on campus.

 

 

 

 

 

You Caring

One month after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, 3 million Puerto Ricans, or 80%, are still without power. More than a third of households are without reliable drinking water at home. The death toll may be in the hundreds. CNN reports that “much of the island feels like it was hit by a storm yesterday.” And some Puerto Ricans are expressing the worry that the news cycle will turn and the island’s needs will be forgotten.

The Rediscovered Bookshop

Before men ruled the earth, there were wolves.

Once abundant in North America, these majestic creatures were hunted to near extinction in the lower 48 states by the 1920s. But in recent decades, conservationists have brought wolves back to the Rockies, igniting a battle over the very soul of the West.

Utah State Today

Renowned American political activist, scholar and author Ibram X. Kendi visited USU recently for a keynote presentation on “How to be an Anti-Racist.” The presentation was sponsored by the USU Access and Diversity Center. Kendi, an award-winning historian and New York Times best-selling author, is professor of history and international relations and the founding director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University. His second book, “Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America,” won the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction.

WBUR

For thousands of years, tracking animals meant following footprints. Now satellites, drones, camera traps, cellphone networks, and accelerometers reveal the natural world as never before. Where the Animals Go offers a comprehensive, data-driven portrait of how creatures like ants, otters, owls, turtles, and sharks navigate the world.

Civilian Reader

In her first year of eligibility, Gailey was nominated for a Hugo Award for her critique and celebration of the women of Harry Potter, in a category alongside legendary fiction writer Neil Gaiman and the late Carrie Fisher.

The Salt Lake Tribune

Bestselling author Ted Stewart explains how the Supreme Court and its nine appointed members now stand at a crucial point in their power to hand down momentous and far-ranging decisions. Today's Court affects every major area of American life, from health care to civil rights, from abortion to marriage.

 

Academia.edu

Fairy tale expert Jack Zipes says that the tales "serve a meaningful social function, not just for compensation but for revelation: the worlds projected by the best of our fairy tales reveal the gaps between truth and falsehood in our immediate society."

Jack Zipes is a professor emeritus of German and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota.

 

 

 

 

 

Patheos

Robert Zellner is a civil rights activist and original Freedom Rider. The Alabama-born son and grandson of Ku Klux Klan members, Zellner has devoted his life to building relationships across color lines. In 1963, he was a young organizer of the March on Washington, which gave us Martin Luther's King "I Have a Dream" speech. He describes his 50-plus year career in the memoir The Wrong Side of Murder Creek: A White Southerner in the Freedom Movement.

Fox News

A gunman opened fire on the crowd at a country music festival in Las Vegas on Sunday evening, killing at least 59 and wounding hundreds.

Wednesday morning at 9:00 a.m. on Access Utah we’ll open the phone lines and invite emails and Tweets as we come together as a UPR community to express our thoughts and feelings and try to come to terms with another senseless tragedy.

We’ll have a couple of guests with us who have Las Vegas ties. And we’d love to know what you’re thinking and feeling.

Vimeo.com

A documentary directed by Jenny Mackenzie

USU Libraries

Opera comes in all shapes and sizes. Considered an elitist art form by many, it is capable of touching souls from pioneers and farmers to apostles and politicians. While it may be an acquired taste, we are lured to it via recitals, concerts, oratorios, and even Broadway musicals and anecdotal tales. 

Photo courtesy of Little, Brown and Co.

On Wednesday’s Access Utah, beloved folk singer Dar Williams joins us to talk about her latest book, described as “an impassioned account of the fall and rise of the small American towns she cherishes.”

Dubbed by the New Yorker as "one of America's very best singer-songwriters," Dar Williams has made her career not in stadiums, but touring America's small towns. She has played their venues, composed in their coffee shops, and drunk in their bars. She has seen these communities struggle, but also seen them thrive in the face of postindustrial identity crises.

List Challenges

On our last pledge drive show, we go into the importance of books on Access Utah. We love getting to interview authors and we hope you enjoy listening to these interviews. Ken Sanders from Rare Books and our own Teri Guy join us for the hour to talk about the importance of these book interviews, and encourage your pledges. You will excerpts from some of our favorite book shows, and you can find full interviews for those shows below. Thanks for listening.

Alyssa Roberts

We are continuing our pledge drive this week with more of the best of Access Utah. Today's program has excerpts from our lighter and fun programs. USU assistant professor of English Lynne McNeill, and our own development officer Ted Twinting join us for the hour to encourage your pledges and talk about what makes Access Utah so great. We appreciate your support and hope you have as much fun listening to our show as we have making it. 

American Civil Liberties Union

We continue our fundraising efforts this week with another Best of Access Utah show. Today we focused on our current event shows and emphasized freedom of speech. Associate professor of communication studies at Utah State University Jason Gilmore, and our own Katie Swain join us for the hour to encourage your pledges and discuss the importance of free speech in America. You will hear excerpts from our shows on the Charlottesville Riot, Bears Ears National Monument, and the March For Science. Links to the full shows can be found below. Thanks for listening to Access Utah. 

Utah State University

Wednesday, we are taking pledges and replaying excerpts from some of our best interviews on Access Utah. We appreciate your support not only of us, but of the arts as well. Dr. Craig Jessop, Dean of Utah State University's Caine College of the Arts, and UPR's station manager Peg Arnold join us to discuss the unique importance of the arts. Join us as we revisit our favorite interviews — the best Access Utah has to offer.

How did we get here?

In this sweeping, eloquent history of America, Kurt Andersen shows that what’s happening in our country today—this post-factual, “fake news” moment we’re all living through—is not something new, but rather the ultimate expression of our national character. America was founded by wishful dreamers, magical thinkers, and true believers, by hucksters and their suckers. Fantasy is deeply embedded in our DNA.

The Banner

What would it be like to see everyone as a friend?

Twelve-year-old Eli D'Angelo has a genetic disorder that obliterates social inhibitions, making him irrepressibly friendly, indiscriminately trusting and unconditionally loving toward everyone he meets. It also makes him enormously vulnerable. 

Author Jennifer Latson follows Eli's story in "The Boy Who Loved Too Much," exploring the boy's coming-of-age as his mother, Gayle, is forced to decide whether to shield Eli entirely from the world or give him the freedom to find his own way. 

Center for American Progress

 

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has completed the review of national monuments mandated by President Trump. He has not released his recommendations. The New York Times is reporting that those recommendations include reducing the size of 4 national monuments, including Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante in Utah. Reports are that Secretary Zinke may recommend a drastic reduction in size for Bears Ears.

Photo courtesy of Amazon.Com

 

Charlie Huenemann is professor of philosophy at Utah State University. He is the author of several books and essays on the history of philosophy, as well as some fun stuff, such as “How You Play the Game: A Philosopher Plays Minecraft.” We’ll talk about white supremacists’ fascination with Nietzsche and ask if they are misreading the German philosopher. (Huenemann has written a book on Nietzsche).

Family history, usually destined or even designed for limited consumption, is a familiar genre within Mormon culture. Mostly written with little attention to standards of historical scholarship, such works are a distinctly hagiographic form of family memorabilia. But many family sagas in the right hands can prove widely engaging, owing to inherent drama and historical relevance. They can truthfully illuminate larger matters of history, humanity, and culture.

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