Connect with UPR:
Utah Environment
5:20 pm
Tue December 10, 2013

Sounds Of The West - Audio Archive Is Largest In West

Thousands of animal and ambient sounds from 11 western states have been recorded and archived in a digital library in Utah. While fascinating in their own right, sounds can also be used to track environmental change.

Kim Schuske reports

Some people like to hunt animals, not to kill them, but to record the sounds they make.

Conservationists, scientists, volunteers, and state and federal agency employees have contributed over 2,600 animal sounds that are now housed at the biggest library of its kind in the west, called the Western Soundscape Archive. The project was founded by recording engineer Jeff Rice and digital librarian Kenning Arlitsch in order to document the sounds of animals living in the west and to make people aware so they will want to protect the environments where these animals live.

An example of a 24-hour picture of sounds from Pasture Wash, Grand Canyon National Park.
Credit Western Soundscape Archive

The digital sound archive is kept at the University of Utah’s Willard J. Marriott Library. Anna Neatrour  helped develop the archive.

"The Western Soundscape Archive provides a really good overview of all the species that live in our states as well as also ambient sounds for National Parks," she said.  "Quite a variety of sounds that people can listen to from their computers."
 
Neatrour said archiving animal sounds is important because when people think about environmental issues and declining landscapes, they usually think about the visual aspects.

"The sounds associated with these natural landscapes change as well," she added. "So preserving that now for the future is very useful."

But recording the sounds is not always easy. Many animals are active early in the morning and can be in hard to reach locations. Different microphones are needed for different jobs. By using a parabolic microphone it’s possible to pick up weak sounds from a few meters away, while a small remote microphone can be dropped into burrows in the ground or holes in trees. ButNeatrour said some sound enthusiasts go even further.

"If you search the archive for 'ant interview,' you can hear a story of a scientist describe how he recorded the vibrations that ants make by holding them between his teeth," she said. "It shows how devoted people are for capturing these sounds."

The recordings include over 500 bird species, 300 mammals, dozens of snakes, turtles, lizards, and frogs, as well as multiple insects. Many of the recordings are paired with predicted species distribution maps and pictures of the animals, which can be found by common or scientific name.  

"We have some sounds from animals that you think would not make sounds, like earth worms for example," Neatrour said. "And in that case the sound for that sound clip, it’s more like the dirt falling as the earthworm moves through the ground."

The individual animal sounds are important, but so are collections of sounds from particular landscapes. These collections, or soundscapes, include sounds of animals, geophysical features such as wind and streams, and human-produced sounds collected over the course of a day from different locations in the natural world.

Soundscapes are frequently represented visually as spectrograms. The images of daily acoustic patterns can be used to better understand the area’s biodiversity and health. Donated by the National Park Service, there are over 10,000 spectral images from 24 National Parks in the Western Soundscape Archive.

"You can actually look at these sound wave graphs and pinpoint things like airplane flights going overhead and disrupting the landscape versus variations in the ambient noise you might get in the different season. So that is something that can appeal more if people are doing research in that area," she said.

Scientists are realizing that the auditory environment is as important as the visual landscape in understanding the health of an ecosystem. And the National Park Service is actively searching for ways to better protect the natural environment from the impact of human sounds, since studies suggest the acoustical environment is important for animals to find mates, protect their young, and to communicate about territories.

So the next time you are out in nature, remember to listen as well as look.

To learn more and find links to sounds in this story go to exploreutahscience.org