Ron Chernow's 'Alexander Hamilton' on Monday's Access Utah

Apr 18, 2016

On Monday’s Access Utah we’ll talk with biographer Ron Chernow as a part of the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative. Chernow’s “Alexander Hamilton” is the inspiration for the hit Broadway musical “Hamilton!” We’ll ask Chernow if he thinks the musical faithfully represents Hamilton’s life and ideas, and why it is resonating so powerfully with audiences. Chernow says that Hamilton “was a messenger from a future that we now inhabit.” We’ll ask Chernow what Hamilton has stood for over time and what he stands for now.

In the second half of the program we’ll talk with historian H.W. Brands about the Electoral College and other topics. His recent articles include “How Trump Has Proved the Founders Right.” Also, for the past three years Brands has been writing a history of the United States in haiku form and publishing it on Twitter. We’ll be sure to ask him about that as well.

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In the second half of the program we’ll talk with historian H.W. Brands about the Electoral College and other topics. His recent articles include “How Trump Has Proved the Founders Right.” Also, for the past three years Brands has been writing a history of the United States in haiku form and publishing it on Twitter. We’ll be sure to ask him about that as well. 

Ron Chernow won the Pulitzer Prize in 2011 for his “George Washington: A Life.”Chernow won the National Book Award in 1990 for his first book, The House of Morgan, and his second book, The Warburgs, won the Eccles Prize as the Best Business Book of 1993. His biography of John D. Rockefeller, Sr., “Titan,” was a national bestseller and a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist.

Henry William Brands holds the Jack S. Blanton Sr. Chair in History at the University of Texas at Austin. He writes on American history and politics, and his books include “The Man Who Saved the Union,” “Andrew Jackson,” “The Age of Gold,” and “TR”. Several of his books have been bestsellers; two, “Traitor to His Class” and “The First American,” were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize. Brands lectures frequently on historical and current events and can be seen and heard on national and international television and radio.

 

This program is made possible by a grant from the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative for a collaboration between UPR, Utah Humanities, the Salt Lake Tribune, and KCPW. Campfires is a joint venture of the Pulitzer Prizes Board and the Federation of State Humanities Council in celebration of the 2016 centennial of the Prizes. The initiative seeks to illuminate the impact of journalism and the humanities on American life today, to imagine their future and to inspire new generations to consider the values represented by the body of Pulitzer Prize-winning work. The Campfires Initiative is also supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Ford Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the Pulitzer Prizes Board, and Columbia University.

 

Ron Chernow won the Pulitzer Prize in 2011 for his “George Washington: A Life.”Chernow won the National Book Award in 1990 for his first book, The House of Morgan, and his second book, The Warburgs, won the Eccles Prize as the Best Business Book of 1993. His biography of John D. Rockefeller, Sr., “Titan,” was a national bestseller and a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist.