Revisiting Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist Ken Armstrong On Tuesday's Access Utah

Nov 22, 2016

Credit propublica.org

  Tuesday on Access Utah we’ll spend the hour with multiple Pulitzer winning reporter Ken Armstrong, who, with T. Christian Miller (of ProPublica), won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting for “a startling examination and expose of law enforcement's enduring failures to investigate reports of rape properly and to comprehend the traumatic effects on its victims.” Tuesday’s episode is part of the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative.

 

 

 

Ken Armstrong previously worked at The Seattle Times, where he and Michael J. Berens won the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting for “their investigation of how a little known governmental body in Washington State moved vulnerable patients from safer pain-control medication to methadone, a cheaper but more dangerous drug, coverage that prompted statewide health warnings.” Armstrong also worked at The Chicago Tribune, where his work helped prompt the Illinois governor to suspend executions and later to empty death row. He has been the McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton and a Nieman Fellow at Harvard. He is currently associated with The Marshall Project, a nonpartisan, nonprofit news organization that seeks to create and sustain a sense of national urgency about the U.S. criminal Justice system.

 

This program is made possible by a grant from the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative for a collaboration between UPR, Utah Humanities, the Salt Lake Tribune, and KCPW. Campfires is a joint venture of the Pulitzer Prizes Board and the Federation of State Humanities Councils in celebration of the 2016 centennial of the Prizes. The initiative seeks to illuminate the impact of journalism and the humanities on American life today, to imagine their future and to inspire new generations to consider the values represented by the body of Pulitzer Prize-winning work. The Campfires Initiative is also supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Ford Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the Pulitzer Prizes Board, and Columbia University.