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Tom Williams

Program Director, Access Utah Host

Tom Williams worked as a part-time UPR announcer for a few years and joined Utah Public Radio full-time in 1996.  He is a proud graduate of Uintah High School in Vernal and Utah State University (B. A. in Liberal Arts and Master of Business Administration.)  He grew up in a family that regularly discussed everything from opera to religion to politics. He is interested in just about everything and loves to engage people in conversation, so you could say he has found the perfect job as host “Access Utah” and “Opera Saturday.”  He and his wife Becky, live in Logan.

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Access Utah
9:44 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Open Internet? On Wednesday's Access Utah

“The principle of net neutrality guarantees a level playing field in which Internet users do not have to pay Internet service providers more for better access to online content, and content generators do not have to pay additional fees to ensure users can access their websites or apps. In other words all Internet traffic should be treated equally.” (Leticia Miranda, The Nation). 


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Access Utah
10:13 am
Tue May 27, 2014

"Marriage Markets: How Inequality is Remaking the American Family" On Tuesday's Access Utah

 

There was a time when the phrase "American family" conjured up a single, specific image: a breadwinner dad, a homemaker mom, and their 2.5 kids living comfortable lives in a middle-class suburb. Today, that is no longer the case, due to divorce rates, single parenthood, and increased out-of-wedlock births. Most Americans fail to identify the root factor driving the changes: economic inequality that is remaking the American family along class lines. 

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Access Utah
9:20 am
Thu May 22, 2014

Salt Lake Tribune In Danger? We'll Discuss On Thursday's Access Utah

Credit utahpoliticohub.com

Concerned community members say that because of a new joint operating agreement between the Salt Lake Tribune and the Deseret News, the Tribune is in danger.


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Access Utah
11:24 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Veteran's Stories on Wednesday's Access Utah

Mark Greenblatt's latest book, "Valor," features the story of Sergeant Buck Doyle, a Cache Valley Native.
Credit markleegreenblatt.com

With Memorial Day approaching, we’ll honor our military veterans on Wednesday’s Access Utah. Mark Lee Greenblatt, author of “VALOR: Unsung Heroes from Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Home Front,” will join us along with Sergeant Buck Doyle, a Utah resident who is featured in the book. We'll also speak with WWII veteran Edgar Harrell who will recount his experiences in the sinking of the USS Indianapolis and the sharks, hypothermia and the struggle to survive one of the U.S. Navy's greatest catastrophes at sea. Edgar Harrell is author of “Out of the Depths.” Then Terry Schow, former Utah Director of Veterans Affairs will discuss how changes in health care are affecting those who fought for our country. 


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Access Utah
11:15 am
Tue May 20, 2014

"Scaling Wind," Documentary on Energy on Tuesday's Access Utah

Credit cleantechnica.com

A new documentary from Greentech Films, “Scaling Wind,” looks at people championing the proposal of the U.S. Department of Energy’s 2008 report, “20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030,” the film profiles people working to overcome the challenges facing achievement of the 20% vision, including the need to modernize and expand the power grid and smarten the nation’s energy policy for a stable market.


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Access Utah
11:51 am
Mon May 19, 2014

"Wrecks of Human Ambition" on Monday's Access Utah

Credit utah.edu

The red rock canyon country of southeastern Utah and northeastern Arizona is one of the most isolated, wild, and beautiful regions of North America. Europeans and Americans over time have mostly avoided, disdained, or ignored it. Wrecks of Human Ambition illustrates how this landscape undercut notions and expectations of good, productive land held by the first explorers, settlers, and travelers who visited it. Even today, its aridity and sandy soils prevent widespread agricultural exploitation, and its cliffs, canyons, and rivers thwart quick travel in and through the landscape.


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Access Utah
10:50 am
Thu May 15, 2014

"The Montana Vigilantes, 1863-1870" on Thursday's Access Utah

Historians and novelists alike have described the vigilantism that took root in the gold-mining communities of Montana in the mid-1860s, but Mark C. Dillon is the first to examine the subject through the prism of American legal history, considering the state of criminal justice and law enforcement in the western territories and also trial procedures, gubernatorial politics, legislative enactments, and constitutional rights. 


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Access Utah
9:25 am
Thu May 15, 2014

"Drilling Down" on Wednesday's Access Utah

For more than a century, oil has been the engine of growth for a society that delivers an unprecedented standard of living to many. We now take for granted that economic growth is good, necessary, and even inevitable, but also feel a sense of unease about the simultaneous growth of complexity in the processes and institutions that generate and manage that growth. 


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Access Utah
11:33 am
Tue May 13, 2014

"I Never Met a Story I Didn't Like" On Tuesday's Access Utah

Credit toddsnider.net

For years, Todd Snider has been one of the most beloved country-folk singers in the United States, compared to Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, John Prine, and dozens of others. He's become not only a new-century Dylan but a modern-day Will Rogers, an everyman whose intelligence, self-deprecation, experience, and sense of humor make him a uniquely American character. 


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Access Utah
10:57 am
Mon May 12, 2014

Mormon History, Settlement And Observation On Monday's Access Utah

The Mormon village was originally conceived as a place removed from the rest of the world, a place where the Saints could live strong faith-based identity. Although common in Europe, the pattern that Mormons used of residential villages with outlying farms was unusual in the American West. The first studies of these villages were by travelers who lived among the Mormons and wrote about their experiences. By linking these early accounts to the move of more formal academic studies of the twentieth century, “Saints Observed” provides the most complete look at Mormon community life.


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