Tom Williams

Program Director | Access Utah Host

Tom Williams worked as a part-time UPR announcer for a few years and joined Utah Public Radio full-time in 1996.  He is a proud graduate of Uintah High School in Vernal and Utah State University (B. A. in Liberal Arts and Master of Business Administration.)  He grew up in a family that regularly discussed everything from opera to religion to politics. He is interested in just about everything and loves to engage people in conversation, so you could say he has found the perfect job as host “Access Utah” and “Opera Saturday.”  He and his wife Becky, live in Logan.

Ways to Connect

Allevents.in

“I’m not saying become homeless, but do understand it opens many doors, and helps us appreciate the doors we can close.” That’s Utah native Chris Ames, writing in his book, “An American (homeless) in Paris,” out from University of Utah Press.

NPR.org

Today we’ll explore all things tech with Jonathan Choate from SD7 Technology Group in Logan.

By listener request, we’ll examine new rules set by the FCC on Net Neutrality and how those new rules may affect you. We’ll talk about regulating tech and ask how best to keep our data secure. And we’ll review today’s headlines including the arms race between repressive governments and protesters using the latest in social media.

 

lightwoodduo.com

From lightwoodduo.com:

Unique. Versatile. These are terms often used to describe musical groups or ensembles outside the common, difficult to define. All these terms have been used to describe the Lightwood Duo, the pairing of guitar and clarinet through master musicians Eric Nelson and Mike Christiansen.

Amazon.com

GENTRI: The Gentlemen Trio was established in June 2014 and is comprised of three highly trained tenors: Brad Robins, Casey Elliott and Bradley Quinn Lever. Pioneering a signature sound that can only be described as “Cinematic Pop,” the music of GENTRI is transfused with lush, epic orchestrations and rich, dynamic three-part harmonies all composed by the group’s producer Stephen Nelson. GENTRI’s self-titled, debut EP was released March 31, 2015. The record spent 10 consecutive weeks in the Top 10 on two different Billboard charts, including three weeks at No.

Allnewspipeline.com

Recently, USU philosophy professors Erica Holberg, Charlie Huenemann, and Harrison Kleiner  participated in a panel discussion with the provocative title: “Are Students Snowflakes?” Next time on Access Utah they’ll join Tom Williams to explore the tension between the value we place on free speech on college campuses and how that value can sometimes collide with the desires of students and others to not be exposed to ideas they find offensive.This discussion has obvious parallels to ongoing issues in broader society.

 

 

Cafe Mom

There are many needs in our communities. And many groups and individuals step up to meet those needs. Periodically on Access Utah we shine a spotlight on non-profits and individuals doing good in our communities.

On Wednesday’s Access Utah, Tom Williams will be joined by Amy Anderson from the Sunshine Terrace Foundation in Logan. They’ll invite you to highlight a non-profit or individual you think is doing great work in your community.

Pexels

Heading into the Thanksgiving holiday, when you may have some extra time for books, we’re compiling our latest UPR booklist. I’ve recently jumped headlong into the history of the Civil War. I’ll tell you which books I recommend on that subject. Elaine Thatcher, our usual co-host for these episodes, always has several fascinating books on her nightstand. She’ll share her list with us. We’ll also get recommendations of interesting new books from booksellers in Moab and Ogden.

Wordpress.com

Our guest for the hour today is visual artist Sam Vernon. This episode is a part of our ongoing series of programs focusing on Utah State University’s Year of the Arts. Sam Vernon earned her MFA in Painting/Printmaking from Yale University in 2015 and her BFA from The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in 2009. Her installations combine xeroxed drawings, photographs, paintings and sculptural components in an exploration of personal narrative and identity.

affirmation.org

Today we talk with scientific researcher and historian Gregory Prince, who earned his graduate degrees in dentistry (DDS) and pathology (PhD) at UCLA. He pursued a four-decade career in pediatric infectious disease research. His love of history led him to write three books: “Power on High: The Development of Mormon Priesthood,” “David O. McKay and the Rise of Modern Mormonism,” co-authored with William Robert Wright, and “Leonard Arrington and the Writing of Mormon History.” Gregory Prince is winner of the 2017 Evans Biography Award for this latest book.

Amazon.com

The extraordinary story of the Russian slave girl Roxelana, who rose from concubine to become the only queen of the Ottoman empire

tedgenoways.com

From tedgenoways.com:  For forty years, Rick Hammond has raised cattle and crops on his wife’s fifth-generation farm. But as he prepares to hand off the operation to his daughter Meghan and her husband Kyle, their entire way of life is under siege.

AM New York

A.J. Jacobs, author of the new book: “It’s All Relative: Adventures Up and Down the World’s Family Tree,” joins us for the hour on Monday’s Access Utah.

New York Times bestselling author of The Know-It-All and The Year of Living Biblically, A.J. Jacobs undergoes a hilarious, heartfelt quest to understand what constitutes family—where it begins and how far it goes—and attempts to untangle the true meaning of the “Family of Humankind.”

Cryptomundo

Jeff Meldrum is Professor of Anatomy and Anthropology at Idaho State University. He is author of “Sasquatch: Legend Meets Science.” He is a leading expert on Bigfoot or Sasquatch, or the term he prefers: “Relict Hominoid.” He says “...[I]t is one matter to address the theoretical possibility of a relict species of hominoid in North America, and the obligate shift in paradigm to accommodate it, but there must also be something substantial to place within that revised framework. There must be essential evidence to lend weight to the hypotheses, and counter the critics’ various aspersions.

tompaxton.com

Tom Paxton says folk music is lumber with the bark still on. His legendary career spans six decades of traditional music and topical songs. He says today's political climate presents an embarrassment of riches to the song writer. He hasn't penned a Trump song yet, but that will come.

Tom Paxton's song have been covered by everyone from Pete Seeger to Bob Dylan to Johnny Cash. 

From tompaxton.com:

Club Runner

In the first half today, a conversation with Utah State University President, Noelle Cockett. We’ll talk about issues in higher education, including sexual assault on campus, immigration, and a recent controversial donation to USU from the Charles Koch Foundation.

Philly.com

Both George Orwell and Winston Churchill came close to death in the mid-1930's—Orwell shot in the neck in a trench line in the Spanish Civil War, and Churchill struck by a car in New York City. If they'd died then, history would scarcely remember them. At the time, Churchill was a politician on the outs, his loyalty to his class and party suspect. Orwell was a mildly successful novelist, to put it generously.

Utah State University

  

"Remember that you will die..." 

On today's spooky edition of Access Utah, we talked with some of Utah State University's foremost experts on the history, art and tradition of death. 

A new online exhibit sponsored by the USU's University Libraries "traces the thematic iconographies of death, dying and mourning."

Titled "Memento Mori," Latin for "Remember that you will die," the exhibit shows how symbols of death and the afterlife became dominant in art with the dawn of western Christianity. 

Roosevelt House

A new sexual revolution is sweeping the country, and college students are on the front lines. Women use fresh, smart methods to fight entrenched sexism and sexual assault even as they celebrate their own sexuality as never before. Many “woke” male students are more sensitive to women’s concerns than previous generations ever were, while other men perpetuate the most cruel misogyny. Amid such apparent contradictions, it’s no surprise that intense confusion shrouds the topic of sex on campus.

 

 

 

 

 

You Caring

One month after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, 3 million Puerto Ricans, or 80%, are still without power. More than a third of households are without reliable drinking water at home. The death toll may be in the hundreds. CNN reports that “much of the island feels like it was hit by a storm yesterday.” And some Puerto Ricans are expressing the worry that the news cycle will turn and the island’s needs will be forgotten.

The Rediscovered Bookshop

Before men ruled the earth, there were wolves.

Once abundant in North America, these majestic creatures were hunted to near extinction in the lower 48 states by the 1920s. But in recent decades, conservationists have brought wolves back to the Rockies, igniting a battle over the very soul of the West.

WBUR

For thousands of years, tracking animals meant following footprints. Now satellites, drones, camera traps, cellphone networks, and accelerometers reveal the natural world as never before. Where the Animals Go offers a comprehensive, data-driven portrait of how creatures like ants, otters, owls, turtles, and sharks navigate the world.

Civilian Reader

In her first year of eligibility, Gailey was nominated for a Hugo Award for her critique and celebration of the women of Harry Potter, in a category alongside legendary fiction writer Neil Gaiman and the late Carrie Fisher.

The Salt Lake Tribune

Bestselling author Ted Stewart explains how the Supreme Court and its nine appointed members now stand at a crucial point in their power to hand down momentous and far-ranging decisions. Today's Court affects every major area of American life, from health care to civil rights, from abortion to marriage.

 

Academia.edu

Fairy tale expert Jack Zipes says that the tales "serve a meaningful social function, not just for compensation but for revelation: the worlds projected by the best of our fairy tales reveal the gaps between truth and falsehood in our immediate society."

Jack Zipes is a professor emeritus of German and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota.

 

 

 

 

 

Patheos

Robert Zellner is a civil rights activist and original Freedom Rider. The Alabama-born son and grandson of Ku Klux Klan members, Zellner has devoted his life to building relationships across color lines. In 1963, he was a young organizer of the March on Washington, which gave us Martin Luther's King "I Have a Dream" speech. He describes his 50-plus year career in the memoir The Wrong Side of Murder Creek: A White Southerner in the Freedom Movement.

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