Tom Williams

Program Director, Access Utah Host

Tom Williams worked as a part-time UPR announcer for a few years and joined Utah Public Radio full-time in 1996.  He is a proud graduate of Uintah High School in Vernal and Utah State University (B. A. in Liberal Arts and Master of Business Administration.)  He grew up in a family that regularly discussed everything from opera to religion to politics. He is interested in just about everything and loves to engage people in conversation, so you could say he has found the perfect job as host “Access Utah” and “Opera Saturday.”  He and his wife Becky, live in Logan.

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Access Utah
10:29 am
Fri August 23, 2013

An Encore Hour With Terry Tempest Williams: Monday’s Access Utah

Terry Tempest Williams’ mother told her, “I am leaving you all my journals, but you must promise me you won’t look at them until after I’m gone.”

“They were exactly where she said they would be: three shelves of beautiful cloth-bound books . . . I opened the first journal. It was empty. I opened the second journal. It was empty. I opened the third. It too was empty . . . Shelf after shelf after shelf, all of my mother’s journals were blank.”

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Access Utah
1:45 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind on Friday's Access Utah

Credit www.thinkfun.com

Enchanted by electricity as a boy, William Kamkwamba wanted to study science in Malawi's top boarding schools. But in 2002, his country was stricken with a famine that devastated his family's farm and left his parents destitute. Unable to pay the eighty-dollar-a-year tuition for his education, William was forced to drop out and help his family forage for food as thousands across the country starved and died. But William refused to let go of his dreams. He embarked on a daring plan to bring his family a set of luxuries that only two percent of Malawians could afford--electricity and running water.

 

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Access Utah
3:19 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

The Viper on the Hearth on Wednesday's Access Utah

Credit global.oup.com

 When it was published in 1997, The Wall Street Journal called Terryl Givens' “The Viper on the Hearth: Mormons, Myths, and the Construction of Heresy” "one of the five best books on Mormonism." Now, in the wake of a tidal wave of Mormon-inspired artistic, literary, and political activity--ranging from the Broadway hit The Book of Mormon, to the HBO series Big Love, to the political campaign of Mitt Romney--Givens has updated the book to address the continuing presence and reception of the Mormon image in contemporary culture. “The Viper on the Hearth” shows how nineteenth- and twentieth-century American writers frequently cast the Mormon as a stock villain in such fictional genres as mysteries, westerns, and popular romances.

 

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Access Utah
4:29 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Do You Have Enough Money to Retire? Tuesdays Access Utah

Credit afterfiftyliving.com

According to a study from the Employee Benefit Research Institute, 28 percent of Americans have no confidence they will have enough money to retire comfortably -- the highest figure in the study's 23-year history. 41 percent do say they are at least somewhat confident. How confident are you? Until recently most of our attention has focused on accumulating assets for retirement; now as baby boomers retire, there is a lot more emphasis on managing money IN retirement to make it last. How much do you need for your retirement? Can you rely on the stock market to safely leverage your savings? How will recent changes in health care and other laws affect your retirement? What if you are self-employed or relying on a pension?

 

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Access Utah
11:01 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Cronkite Biography on Thursday's Access Utah

For decades, Walter Cronkite was known as "the most trusted man in America." Millions across the nation welcomed him into their homes, first as a print reporter for the United Press on the front lines of World War II, and  later, in the emerging medium of television, as a host of numerous documentary programs and as anchor of the CBS Evening News, from 1962 until his retirement in 1981.

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Access Utah
4:26 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Genetically Modified Foods on Monday's Access Utah

Credit bilaterals.com

Are GMOs or Genetically Modified Organisms beneficial or dangerous to global health? Are GMOs critical to sustainability or a danger to the environment? Should companies have the right to patent seeds? Can GMOs co-exist with organic farming? We’ll seek answers to your GMO questions from Jennifer Reeve, USU Associate Professor of Organic and Sustainable Agriculture; David Hole, USU Professor of Plant Breeding/Genetics; and Amelia Smith Rinehart, U of U Associate Professor of Law.  You can join the discussion by email or on our Utah Public Radio Facebook page.

 

Access Utah
1:10 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Air Quality & Climate Change from Vernal on Tuesday's Access Utah

Credit galleristny.com

Eastern Utah’s Uintah Basin has seen sharp increase in economic development in recent years with oil and gas extraction leading the way. Uintah County has grown by 29% in the last decade. With this growth has come an increasing air quality problem. A coalition of public health and conservation groups sued the Environmental Protection Agency last year, saying the agency is failing to protect the Uintah Basin from high levels of air pollution. Can industry and cars coexist with good air? Do we face a choice between jobs and a healthy environment? And what about climate change? Is oil and gas extraction in eastern Utah contributing to climate change? What can and should be done?

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Access Utah
1:10 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Restorative Justice on Monday's Access Utah

Credit cetconnect.org

Young people in the United States are entering the youth justice system in shocking numbers, and many seem to come out worse than when they went in. More than half of incarcerated kids are likely to re-commit crimes after being released. Some wonder whether exposure to the system itself could be perpetuating a life of crime. On the other side of the world, a New Zealand youth court has incorporated restorative principles of justice adapted from Maori culture, bringing victims and offenders together to resolve disputes. In Maori history, a crime put the community out of balance. Traditional Maori justice seeks to restore that balance. Focusing on rehabilitation more than punishment, New Zealand has seen great success and set a precedent for youth justice around the world.


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Access Utah
11:23 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Utah Rural Summit on Friday's Access Utah

Credit www.usu.edu

For two days each year in August, county, municipal and state leaders and other stake holders gather in Cedar City for the Utah Rural Summit. They come from throughout Utah to explore issues that impact rural life, to hear from experts the latest information pertaining to rural life, and to discuss policies necessary to maintain and expand the political, cultural and economic relevance of rural communities. UPR's Southern Utah Correspondent Chris Holmes reports from the summit on its second day.


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Access Utah
3:55 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

A Farm Daughter's Lament on Wednesday's Access Utah

Credit pagesofjulia.com

Thomas Jefferson called farmers “the chosen people of God” and claimed that they were inherently virtuous, the best citizens for the new republic. Evelyn Funda, author of “Weeds: A Farm Daughter’s Lament,” says that “the American imagination has endowed farming with profound and enduring symbolic significance. ...no other occupation —with perhaps the exception of motherhood—so fully spans the imaginative range of human experience or is so profoundly invested with symbolic significance in our culture, even by those who have never worked or lived on a farm.” In Jefferson’s day, 90 percent of the population worked on family farms. Today, in a world dominated by agribusiness, less than 1 percent of Americans claim farm-related occupations. What was lost along the way is something that Funda experienced firsthand when, in 2001, her parents sold the last parcel of the farm they had worked since they married in 1957.

 

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