Tom Williams

Program Director, Access Utah Host

Tom Williams worked as a part-time UPR announcer for a few years and joined Utah Public Radio full-time in 1996.  He is a proud graduate of Uintah High School in Vernal and Utah State University (B. A. in Liberal Arts and Master of Business Administration.)  He grew up in a family that regularly discussed everything from opera to religion to politics. He is interested in just about everything and loves to engage people in conversation, so you could say he has found the perfect job as host “Access Utah” and “Opera Saturday.”  He and his wife Becky, live in Logan.

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Access Utah
5:36 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Encore Presentation of Mother George on Thursday

Credit leecantwell.com

Today we revisit one of the most popular programs from our archives. Mother George was a black midwife who practiced her art in a small southeastern Idaho town for 40 years. When she died around 1919, the women dressing her for burial discovered that she was man.

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Access Utah
8:45 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Provo's First Pride Parade on Wednesday's Access Utah

Saturday, September, 21, will mark a historic moment for members of the LGBT community in Utah: the first Provo Pride Festival is planned for that day. Utah has held an annual, 3 day long, pride festival in Salt Lake City since 1983. Utah Pride started quite small but has grown to include national headliners and recent attendance has reached to well over 20,000 people.

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Access Utah
11:05 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Three Mormon Towns Explored by Ansel Adams and Dorthea Lange on Tuesday's Access Utah

Credit artblart.com

Dorthea Lange and Ansel Adams are two of the most well-known photographers of the 20th century. Lange humanized American's struggle for economic and social justice through her documentary photography, while Adams' landscapes spurred environmental protection of the wild places of the American West. These two household names had already defined Western portraiture and landscape when Adams and Lange undertook a joint venture to document the changing ways of life in three Mormon towns (St. George, Toquerville, & Gunlock.)

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Access Utah
11:09 am
Mon September 9, 2013

The Guerrilla Girls, Exposing Sexism and Fighting Corruption on Monday's Access Utah

Credit arts.usu.edu

In the spring of 1985 the Museum of Modern Art held an international exhibition of the year's most significant artists. Out of 169 artists showcased, only 13 were women. Infuriated, a group of women found themselves protesting the museum and created The Guerrilla Girls.


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StoryCorps
10:23 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Home at last: The story of one family's search for a home

Sonya Gelter (left) and Lil Barron talk about Sonya's experience finding and receiving a home from Habitat for Humanity
Credit STORYCORPS

Sonya Gelter is a single mom of five children, and she was the recipient of a zero-percent loan for a Habitat for Humanity home. She was interviewed by Lil Barron, a Habitat for Humanity employee, in the booth at StoryCorps.

"I was just getting divorced. I had five children, and we were on our way to losing a home," Sonya said of her life just prior to her Habitat for Humanity experience. "I didn't know what to do, or where to go. I had these five kids, my youngest, the twins, were a year and a half old."

Listen to Sonya's story.

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Access Utah
3:46 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

A Frontier Life on Thursday's Access Utah

Credit www.benchmarkbooks.com

Frontiersman, colonizer, missionary to the Indians, and explorer of the American West, Jacob Hamblin has long been one of the most enigmatic figures in Mormon history. In a new biography “A Frontier Life: Jacob Hamblin, Explorer and Indian Missionary” Todd Compton disentangles many of the myths and controversies surrounding Hamblin and presents a portrait of a true pioneer who lived life at the geographical, cultural, and spiritual boundaries of his era.

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Access Utah
4:01 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Creating Self in an Infectious World on Wednesday's Access Utah

Credit www.tatteredcover.com

“Self” has many definitions. Science has demonstrated that 90 percent of the cells in our bodies are bacteria—we are in many respects more non-self than self. In “Lousy Sex: Creating Self in an Infectious World” Gerald Callahan explores the science of self, illustrating the immune system’s role in forming individual identity. Blending scientific essay with deeply personal narrative, he uses microbiology and immunology to explore a new way to answer the question, who am I? Through stories about the sex lives of wood lice, the biological advantages of eating dirt, the question of immortality, the relationship between syphilis and the musical genius of Beethoven, he creates another way, a chimeric way, of seeing ourselves.

 

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Access Utah
3:22 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Senator Osmond on Education on Tuesday's Access Utah

Credit genlive.com

Last week, in part one of our three-part series on K-12 education, we talked about State Senator Aaron Osmond’s proposal to end compulsory education in Utah. Today, in part two of the series, we talk to Senator Osmond himself. He says that parents, not schools, are ultimately responsible for their children’s education.

 


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Access Utah
4:02 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

The Rise of the Warrior Cop on Thursday's Access Utah

Credit salon.com

Today’s armored-up policemen are a far cry from the constables of early America. The unrest of the 1960s brought about the invention of the SWAT unit—which in turn led to the debut of military tactics in the ranks of police officers. According to investigative journalist Radley Balko, Nixon’s War on Drugs, Reagan’s War on Poverty, Clinton’s COPS program, the post–9/11 security state under Bush and Obama: by degrees, each of these innovations expanded and empowered police forces, always at the expense of civil liberties.

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Access Utah
5:49 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

March on Washington 50 Years Later on Wednesday's Access Utah

Credit abcnews.go.com

On August 28, 1963, thousands marched on Washington in support of civil rights. The assembled crowd of more than 250,000 heard Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. deliver his now-famous “I Have a Dream” speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. On Access Utah (on the fiftieth anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom) we ask: has the dream articulated by Dr. King been realized? What progress has been made? What remains to be done? What is your dream? How are we progressing towards it? What does this anniversary mean to you?

 

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