Tom Williams

Program Director, Access Utah Host

Tom Williams worked as a part-time UPR announcer for a few years and joined Utah Public Radio full-time in 1996.  He is a proud graduate of Uintah High School in Vernal and Utah State University (B. A. in Liberal Arts and Master of Business Administration.)  He grew up in a family that regularly discussed everything from opera to religion to politics. He is interested in just about everything and loves to engage people in conversation, so you could say he has found the perfect job as host “Access Utah” and “Opera Saturday.”  He and his wife Becky, live in Logan.

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Access Utah
8:34 am
Wed November 20, 2013

"The Story of the Human Body" on Wednesday's Access Utah

Credit npr.org

In “The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health, and Disease,” Daniel E. Lieberman—chair of the department of human evolutionary biology at Harvard University — explains how the human body evolved over millions of years and shows how the increasing disparity between the adaptations in our Stone Age bodies and advancements in the modern world has led to a paradox: we are living longer but are increasingly prone to chronic disease. 

    

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Access Utah
8:33 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Return of the Wolves on Tuesday's Access Utah

Credit petercoyote.com

It’s been almost 20 years since wolves were reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park and parts of Idaho and placed on the endangered species list. At the time, advocates said wolves were a vital link in the natural ecosystem. Worried about the effect of wolves on their livelihoods, ranchers and hunters protested the reintroduction, some even filing lawsuits. 


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Access Utah
8:37 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Natural and Human History of the Colorado River on Monday's Access Utah

Credit newswatch.nationalgeographic.com

If the Colorado River stopped flowing, the water in its reservoirs might hold out for three or four years, but then it would be necessary to abandon most of southern California and Arizona, and much of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. For the entire American Southwest the Colorado is the river of life, which makes it all the more tragic and ironic that by the time it approaches its final destination, it has been reduced to a shadow upon the sand. 


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Programs
8:56 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Nobel Prize Recipient Lars Peter Hansen and NPR's David Folkenflik on Thursday's Access Utah

Utah State University alumnus Lars Peter Hansen is one of three Americans recently named as a recipient of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Economics. Professor Hansen, a Cache Valley native who now teaches at the University of Chicago, will share his feelings on winning the Nobel Prize and discuss his research. He will also discuss the recent housing bubble, and government regulation of markets. 

    

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Programs
7:00 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Jared Diamond on Wednesday's Access Utah

Credit uspenguingroup.com

Jared Diamond, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “Guns, Germs and Steel,” “Collapse,” and other books, joins Tom Williams to discuss his latest: “The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn From Traditional Societies?” which is now out in paperback. 


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Access Utah
10:40 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Demise of Local Newspapers on Tuesday's Access Utah

Credit mashable.com

A series of Tanner Talks continues at USU on Wednesday with a panel discussion called “Community and the Demise of Local Newspapers.” Media veterans will offer their insights, concerns, warnings and prognostications as local newspapers struggle and community news evolves. Organizer and Assistant Professor in the USU Department of Journalism and Communication Matthew LaPlante, quoted in USU Today, said “I love newspapers. That’s where I come from but we have to start opening up people to the idea that, yes, there are things that we are losing as local newspapers decline. But this also gives us an opportunity to redefine the ways we communicate in our communities.” 


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Access Utah
10:51 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Veteran Integration on Monday's Access Utah

Credit pleasantondowntown.net

On Veterans Day we consider the problems of returning military veterans and how we can help. Joining us are Matthew LaPlante, USU Assistant Professor of Journalism, and U. S. Navy veteran,  who covered veterans issues for the Salt Lake Tribune for 7 years; former Executive Director at the Utah Department of Veterans Affairs, and U. S. Army veteran, Terry Schow; Public Affairs Officer for the U. S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and veteran, Jill Atwood; and former US Army Captain Stacy Bare, Director of Sierra Club Outdoors Mission, an initiative to reconnect Americans, veterans in particular, to the outdoors and to use nature to facilitate reintegration.

 


Access Utah
7:35 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

The Second Cooler on Thursday's Access Utah

Credit interfaithmissionservice.org

During the period of October 1, 2000 to April 30, 2013 the remains of 2,541 migrants who had crossed the U.S./Mexico border illegally, were recovered from Cochise, Pima and Yuma counties in Arizona, according to the AZ Daily Star Recovered Human Remains Project. In order to store the bodies, Pima County installed a second morgue refrigerator. They call it the Second Cooler. 


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Access Utah
12:22 am
Wed November 6, 2013

Nicholas Basbanes on Wednesday's Access Utah

Credit nicholasbasbanes.com

Nicholas Basbanes, author of a trilogy on all things book-related including “A Gentle Madness: Bibliophiles, Bibliomanes, and the Eternal Passion for Books,”  is out with a new book: “On Paper: The Everything of Its Two-Thousand Year History,” in which he considers everything from paper’s invention in China two thousand years ago, which revolutionized human civilization, to its crucial role in the unfolding of historical events, political scandals, and sensational trials: from the American Revolution to the Pentagon Papers and Watergate. 


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Access Utah
12:42 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Jacob Dorman's "Chosen People" on Tuesday's Access Utah

Credit global.oup.com/

In 1991, riots began in New York City after a white Hasidic Jew struck two black children while driving in Crown Heights, killing one of them. A rumor started that emergency responders rushed to help the Jewish men in the car, but not the children. When the news spread, anti-Semitic violence left one Jewish man dead — despite the fact that the he wasn’t involved in the crash. Jacob Dorman, Assistant Professor of History and American Studies at the University of Kansas, says that these events upset the narrative about the two communities as allies in the civil rights movement. 

    

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