Suzi Montgomery

Program Producer, Science Questions

Originally from Edmonton, Alberta, Suzi Montgomery has been in Salt Lake city since 1993. She holds a Bachelor's in Anthropology and a Master's in French Literature & Teaching and is currently an educator and the Senior Producer of SQ Radio, a weekly science radio show from UPR. Radio became her preferred medium after working as a documentarian for the Utah State Anthropology Department and using her archive of 200 interviews of Southern Utah ranchers in the classroom, working with youth to turn firsthand history into radio documentaries. This was the inception of an award-winning youth radio documentary apprenticeship program she ran during her seven-year tenure as Executive Director of Higher Ground Learning, an urban experiential education center.
 
Ms. Montgomery is an advocate for public education and continues to teach in the classroom while using pedagogy to inform her approach to science radio -- the positive impact a teacher can have on a student’s life is one of the things she takes most seriously and radio storytelling is not only a great educational tool, but also the most direct route to the public ear.

http://wdfw.wa.gov/living/coyotes.html

Coyotes are the most abundant predator in America. Today we talk about the controversial K9 and it’s perseverance in the West and question the force of human kind and nature. 

Archeological data suggests the Aché Indians lived and hunted throughout the Atlantic rainforest in Paraguay for thousands of years. Now they are cornered near a shrinking region of the endangered forest, rich in biodiversity and hosts several species threatened with extinction. One Salt Lake resident worked with the tribe. His book tells the story of a fictional band of Aché forced to deal with the diminishing forest in "The Shrinking Jungle.

Downwinders

Nov 9, 2012

There isn't anyone in the U.S. who isn't a downwinder. In collaboration with local artists, Utah state history, and City Academy Charter School, Higher Ground Learning, a creative learning center for youth and 5 teenagers, explored nuclear testing, power and waste from their classroom and from their camp-out in the Utah West Desert, one of the areas hardest hit by the nuclear fall-out.

Science Questions presents new research at Utah State University on climate change in Utah, a new study on the effects of nature on infants, and then SQ radio presents a story that traces the moon landing to find out about the mysterious "moon tree."  

As school days edge closer, producers Sheri Quinn and Suzi Montgomery present this special archival program, a compilation of previously aired youth produced stories from Utah teens from City Academy Charter School in Salt Lake City.  We learn about one teen's gang life, what a boiler maker is, and one teen's perspective on polygamy.  

Science Questions profiles two farmers living on opposite sides of the country, but whom are both profoundly impacted by the oil and gas industry. Science Questions goes to the heart of farm land in Ohio and Utah, where natural gas extraction and farming collide. 

Science Questions is part three in a series on teens and addiction. This episode  presents a new education trend geared toward treating and educating youth who struggle with addiction. These "Recovery Schools" are blooming across the nation, healing students and giving them a second chance at life and graduation.  The program features students from Valley High School in Salt Lake, and discuss the stigma of the school, and how they got an education that helped them grow there.

Today we feature a full hour of Science Questions, discussing the growing problem of teen drug use. From Marajuana to Oxycontin, teens tell their stories of addiction, rehabilitation, and growth. We hear from psychologists and non-professionals alike. 

Sheri Quinn and Suzi Montgomery talk to the past and current members of the Conservation Corps. From the time of the Great Depression on, Americans have been actively engaged in conserving the wilderness for future generations. The duo talks to past members of the corps, teaching their experiences and telling their stories, along with how newcomers are changing the landscape today. Utah Conservation Corps members discuss their involvement and motivation for helping with the conservation of the American lands. 

Today Science Questions presents Part II of the series "In the State of Mental Breakdown," a profile of the mental healthcare crisis in Salt Lake County that mirrors what is happening across the nation.

Today on Science Questions, we begin a two-part series titled, "In the state of Mental Breakdown" discussing the overhaul of the Valley Mental Health system.

Valley mental health has been the major, and almost only mental health provider across the Wasatch Front for the past two decades, and is now under a revamp. Sheri Quinn and Suzi Montgomery talk to doctors and patients to find out how this affects the care given to those who need it.

Science Questions profiles the oil and gas industry, particularly the technique called horizontal hydraulic fracturing. It's like a modern-day gold rush and it is breaking new ground in pockets all over the nation bringing jobs and money to the towns near you.

Copyright Tyler Nordgren

Saturday is World Astronomy Day and we're celebrating by spending the whole hour hanging out with astronomers.

First up is Tyler Nordgren, astronomer and Assistant Professor of Physics at University of the Redlands in California. He visited 12 national parks in one year, photographing the stars in order to create the book Skies Above, Earth Below: A Guide to Astronomy in the National Parks.

SQ Radio introduces us to the brand new Molecular Biotechnology Lab on the University of Utah campus, where interdisciplinary research teams will collaborate to advance big areas in science like nanotechnology, renewable energy, early disease detection, and geochemistry.

Then they profile a USTAR - USU Energy Dynamics Lab project called Intuitive Building, where engineers are developing software and devices that essentially decode an office room scene in order to light it based on the occupants' daily patterns and preferences. The wave of the future!

 

Science questions reveals new research on the effects of environmental toxins and autism and the legal and ethical implications of human diseases caused by environmental exposures. 

Science Questions takes a comprehensive look at what's called the "Paleo Diet", a way of eating that mimics diets of our hunter-gatherer ancestors: lean meats, seafood, vegetables, fruits, and nuts.

Though the field of Epigenetics was conceived in the era of platforms and poly-leisure suits, it has received sparse media attention. And now, scientists are realizing it has the potential to explain A LOT about human disease and evolution particularly, the grey areas where genetics seems to fall short.

90% of the world's large fish are gone due to over-consumption of seafood and by 2048 all ocean fish could be extinct if the world continues to consume at this rate. On Access Utah today, Sheri Quinn talks to Michael Sutton, Vice President of the Monterrey Bay Aquarium, about this global problem.

Part 3 of Science Questions' series on epigenetics is in the second half.

Science Questions presents Part II of the series we started last week about Epigenetics: The New Frontier in Science and Medicine. Today's episode explores current research on the origins of mental illness through the lens of epigenetic science.

Science Questions profiles the largest international gem fair in the world in Tuscon, Arizona -- a bustling marketplace where meteorites, trilobites, and rare gems are showcased.

Today, the very personal story of one man's battle with pancreatic cancer and new research from USTAR scientists, working around-the-clock to design a cancer screening device that will provide early diagnosis of the disease.

At 9:30 Science Questions profiles the world's largest international gem fair in Tuscon, Arizona -- a bustling marketplace where meteorites, trilobites, and rare gems are showcased.

For most of us, no matter how far removed, the words "Back to School" conjure up strong images. This week, Science Questions is going back to school and heralding two exceptional science teachers.

Science Questions presents a one-hour special today with Alan Lightman, author of Einstein's Dreams, musician Randall Williams, and a talented group of junior high students at Salt Lake Arts Academy who created songs, along with Williams, about time based on Lightman's book. Their journey offers a unique window into the power of hands-on education and the beauty of blending the arts and sciences.

Today Science Questions presents a one-hour Sundance Film Festival special broadcast profiling one of the festival's documentary film highlights, Chasing Ice.

Photographer James Balog turned his 2007 National Geographic cover story about melting glaciers into a monumental five-year photography project about climate change. The documentary, directed by Jeff Orlowski, follows Balog's "extreme ice survey" -- an experiment that placed time-lapse cameras across three continents to capture massive ice melting and the effects of climate change.

Science Questions profiles the Civilian Conservation Corp and its impact on how we manage our public lands today.