Sheri Quinn

Program Producer, Science Questions

Sheri Quinn has been doing science radio for the past twelve years. She started the very first science radio program in Utah in 1999, and since has produced multiple national and international broadcasts, including producing an audio series on the Aché in Paraguay and efforts to save the last remnants of the Atlantic Rain Forest.  She is a veteran reporter who has interviewed numerous world-leading scholars, corresponding for Voice of America and NPR.

The Obama Administration is proposing to keep the 2013 National Institute of Health budget the same as this year’s budget, 30.7 billion dollars.  But researchers across the nation say it is not enough and it’s affecting the economy and the pace of medical advances.  Today on the program producer Sheri Quinn talks to Maryland based oncologist Dr. Steve Meltzer who is leading an effort to increase the NIH funding to 33 billion dollars.

Tracking the Coyote

Apr 6, 2012

The clown, the hero, the fool, the sacred one...the coyote plays a number of roles including the most abundant predator in North America. Tracking the coyote takes us on a thorny trail filled with political, ethical and environmental strife that forces us to confront the human struggle for power over nature. Science Questions presents this controversial canine and its perseverance in the West.

Science Questions takes a comprehensive look at what's called the "Paleo Diet", a way of eating that mimics diets of our hunter-gatherer ancestors: lean meats, seafood, vegetables, fruits, and nuts.

Electric roads could power cars in the near future. Today, on Access Utah, we re-broadcast our episode on the international Electric Roads and Vehicles Conference, held in Park City last month.

At 9:30 Science Questions takes a comprehensive look at what's called the "Paleo Diet", a way of eating that mimics diets of our hunter-gatherer ancestors: lean meats, seafood, vegetables, fruits, and nuts.

Stem Cell Research

Mar 23, 2012

Science Questions explores stem cell therapy and its potential to transform the treatment of human disease.  Adult stem cells have been used to treat leukemia since the late 1950s. Among early attempts to do this were several bone marrow transplants conducted in France following a radiation accident.

The Mayflower was the ship that in 1620 transported the pilgrims from Plymouth, England to Plymouth Massachusetts.  Using genealogical records two anthropologists are tracing the life history and migration of these early first settlers. Today on the program they discuss the surprising details of their journey and what they can reveal about ourselves today.

Though the field of Epigenetics was conceived in the era of platforms and poly-leisure suits, it has received sparse media attention. And now, scientists are realizing it has the potential to explain A LOT about human disease and evolution particularly, the grey areas where genetics seems to fall short.

90% of the world's large fish are gone due to over-consumption of seafood and by 2048 all ocean fish could be extinct if the world continues to consume at this rate. On Access Utah today, Sheri Quinn talks to Michael Sutton, Vice President of the Monterrey Bay Aquarium, about this global problem.

Part 3 of Science Questions' series on epigenetics is in the second half.

Science Questions presents Part II of the series we started last week about Epigenetics: The New Frontier in Science and Medicine. Today's episode explores current research on the origins of mental illness through the lens of epigenetic science.

Today on Access Utah, directors Don Argott and Sheena Joyce talk to Sheri Quinn about their 2012 documentary film, Atomic States of America, which premiered this year at Sundance. The film captures both the history of nuclear energy and the potentially looming disaster at our aging sites.

At 9:30 Science Questions presents Part 2 of the series we started last week about Epigenetics: The New Frontier in Science and Medicine. Today's episode explores current research on the origins of mental illness through the lens of epigenetic science.

Science Questions talks to Randy Jirtle, a scientist dedicated to the resurgence of the field of epigenetics and its implications for the future of biology and medicine.

On Access Utah this morning we hear from biologist Robert Rockwell from the American Museum of Natural History about his work in the Arctic tundra and his current research on the impact of global climate change and its effect on the interaction of species in that region and beyond.

At 9:30, on Science Questions we hear from Randy Jirtle, a scientist dedicated to the resurgence of the field of epigenetics and its implications for the future of biology and medicine.

Science Questions profiles the largest international gem fair in the world in Tuscon, Arizona -- a bustling marketplace where meteorites, trilobites, and rare gems are showcased.

Today, the very personal story of one man's battle with pancreatic cancer and new research from USTAR scientists, working around-the-clock to design a cancer screening device that will provide early diagnosis of the disease.

At 9:30 Science Questions profiles the world's largest international gem fair in Tuscon, Arizona -- a bustling marketplace where meteorites, trilobites, and rare gems are showcased.

For most of us, no matter how far removed, the words "Back to School" conjure up strong images. This week, Science Questions is going back to school and heralding two exceptional science teachers.

Electricity is the future of transportation according to engineers at the Electric Roads and Vehicles Conference in Park City, Utah, today. Presenter John Boys, Professor of Electronics at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, pioneered the technology called "inductive power transfer" that allows vehicles to receive electric power from roads, doing away with the need to fuel up or plug in. With escalating gas prices Boys says we need an alternative to keep our cities moving.

At 9:30 Science Questions Explores what's in your school lunch.

Science Questions presents a one-hour special today with Alan Lightman, author of Einstein's Dreams, musician Randall Williams, and a talented group of junior high students at Salt Lake Arts Academy who created songs, along with Williams, about time based on Lightman's book. Their journey offers a unique window into the power of hands-on education and the beauty of blending the arts and sciences.

Science Questions explores the biology of aggression and new research showing the social and physical environment has a lot of influence in sculpting our human genome.

One of the first African American fighter pilots, Lieutenant Colonel James Harvey III, was honored Thursday at Hill Air Force Base. On Access Utah today, we join the celebration in action at the Air Force Base Museum, where the Colonel gave his inspirational speech about the first group of African Americans to fight in World War II, the Tuskegee Airmen.

At 9:30 Science Questions explores the biology of aggression and new research showing the social and physical environment has a lot of influence in sculpting our human genome.
 

Gardening is back! Today on the first half of Access Utah, Jerry Goodspeed joins us from Odgen. He's the Weber County Horticulture Specialist with the USU extension. We'll discuss catalog ordering and some unique plants that might find a home in your garden this year.

On the second half, we'll feature some Sundance reviews and interviews from UPR's Sheri Quinn, Steven Smith, and Tom Williams.

Today Science Questions presents a one-hour Sundance Film Festival special broadcast profiling one of the festival's documentary film highlights, Chasing Ice.

Photographer James Balog turned his 2007 National Geographic cover story about melting glaciers into a monumental five-year photography project about climate change. The documentary, directed by Jeff Orlowski, follows Balog's "extreme ice survey" -- an experiment that placed time-lapse cameras across three continents to capture massive ice melting and the effects of climate change.

Living with Fracking

Jan 20, 2012

Science Questions takes you into the lives of Pennsylvania residents who are personally being impacted by drilling for highly profitable natural gas and what scientists are saying about the controversial practice of hydraulic fracturing, gaining attention across the nation.

The 2012 Sundance Film Festival officially opened Thursday in Park City. Today on the program we join Sundance founder and actor Robert Redford and two of his cohorts at the opening day press conference, where they discuss what's new this year. Redford reveals some of the major changes and challenges he has had to endure and face during the festival's history.

Fire: Science and Magic

Jan 13, 2012

Friday, January 13

Science Questions explores the intersection between science and magic through the lens of two storytellers who are enchanted by the ability of fire to transform nature.

A World Without Fish

Jan 13, 2012

Friday, January 13

In his histories of cod and oysters, author Mark Kurlansky described how those species once thrived in the wild, and how they were depleted. His latest book, A World Without Fish, details how humans are destroying ocean life and how that destruction will affect the entire planet. Sheri Quinn talks to Kurlansky about his book and what we can do to help preserve the oceans.

At 9:30, Science Questions explores the intersection between science and magic through the lens of two storytellers who are enchanted by the ability of fire to transform nature.

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