Sheri Quinn

Program Producer, Science Questions

Sheri Quinn has been doing science radio for the past twelve years. She started the very first science radio program in Utah in 1999, and since has produced multiple national and international broadcasts, including producing an audio series on the Aché in Paraguay and efforts to save the last remnants of the Atlantic Rain Forest.  She is a veteran reporter who has interviewed numerous world-leading scholars, corresponding for Voice of America and NPR.

Science Questions goes into the heart of Nine Mile Canyon in Eastern Utah, where the oil and gas industry has a stronghold. But while extracting natural resources, they are also preserving the canyon's rock art legacy and cultural resources. 

Author Theresa Small from Idaho, joins us on the program today to tell us about her personal journey with her son's meth addiction. She wrote "How to Love an Addict" based on her experience and how she learned, essentially on her own, to take care of her son, herself, and the rest of her family, all while coping with the terrible side effects from an addiction. 

Science Questions presents a profile of an infamous Amur Tiger who stalked his human hunter in Siberia with Canadian author John Valliant. 

Jerry Grace Lyons, a Californian who is one of the pioneers of the Renasissance of midwifery. Rather than bring people into the world, she is sending them to rest in peace. 

Science questions profiles one of the largest and oldest known organisms on earth that resides right here in Utah: a type of quaking aspen. 

Autism rates across the United States are rising. A new Utah study suggest expanded diagnostic criteria could explain the new increatsed incidence of the disorder. Today on Access utah, Sheri Quinn talks to University of Utah adolescent and child psychiatrist Dr. Deborah Bilder about this new finding and her part in the research. 

Dr. Craig Stanford, author of “The Last Tortoise” goes in-depth about the plight of the tortoise across the globe. Tortoise populations are declining, partly because they are being taken as pets and for a food source, and Stanford offers his solutions to increasing their numbers and habitat. 

Today on Access Utah, Sheri Quinn presents a Great Salt Lake Institute Summer workshop where high school students work in the field alongside scientists studying the lake eco system including the notorious brine shrimp and brine flies that make the lake so famous. She’ll also talk to Dr. Stephen Whitmore about Utah State University students who won the fourth rocket building contest in the last five years this past April. 

Science Questions is part three in a series on teens and addiction. This episode  presents a new education trend geared toward treating and educating youth who struggle with addiction. These "Recovery Schools" are blooming across the nation, healing students and giving them a second chance at life and graduation.  The program features students from Valley High School in Salt Lake, and discuss the stigma of the school, and how they got an education that helped them grow there.

On today's Access Utah, Sheri Quinn talks with Wildlife Biologist Steve Amstrup. He spent 27 years researching wild polar bears and was instrumental in getting the bears listed as a threatened species  under the Endangered Species Act. Today, as chief scientist for Polar Bears International, he no longer faces the polar bears in the icy Arctic terrain and instead focuses on raising public awareness about global climate change and its threat to polar bear populations. 

Today we feature a full hour of Science Questions, discussing the growing problem of teen drug use. From Marajuana to Oxycontin, teens tell their stories of addiction, rehabilitation, and growth. We hear from psychologists and non-professionals alike. 

Sheri Quinn and Suzi Montgomery talk to the past and current members of the Conservation Corps. From the time of the Great Depression on, Americans have been actively engaged in conserving the wilderness for future generations. The duo talks to past members of the corps, teaching their experiences and telling their stories, along with how newcomers are changing the landscape today. Utah Conservation Corps members discuss their involvement and motivation for helping with the conservation of the American lands. 

Today on Access Utah we hear from Utah State University Anthropology Professor and author Steve Simms. He has spent the last few decades researching and learning of Utah's ancient peoples with archeology as his scientific tool. His book, "Ancient Peoples of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau," details human occupation starting in the region 13 thousand years ago.

Today Science Questions presents Part II of the series "In the State of Mental Breakdown," a profile of the mental healthcare crisis in Salt Lake County that mirrors what is happening across the nation.

The private aerospace company Space-X launched the first private spacecraft this week bound for the International Space Station. Today on Access Utah, we explore U.S. space security with Victoria Sampson, Director of the Secure World Foundation.

At 9:30 Science Questions presents Part II of the series "In the State of Mental Breakdown," a profile of the mental healthcare crisis in Salt Lake County that mirrors what is happening across the nation.

On Science Questions, storytelling is combined with music as people tell their experiences with hydraulic fracturing and the earthquakes and other effects from it.

Friday on Access Utah, we first have  Science Questions, storytelling is combined with music as people tell their experiences with hydraulic fracturing and the earthquakes and other effects from it.

Today on Science Questions, we begin a two-part series titled, "In the state of Mental Breakdown" discussing the overhaul of the Valley Mental Health system.

Valley mental health has been the major, and almost only mental health provider across the Wasatch Front for the past two decades, and is now under a revamp. Sheri Quinn and Suzi Montgomery talk to doctors and patients to find out how this affects the care given to those who need it.

Today on Access Utah, Sheri Quinn speaks to film makers Don Argott and Sheena Joyce about their movie, The Atomic States of America. The film takes a look at the impact of nuclear power on the lives of every-day Americans, from well-known incidents like Love Canal to the present-day concerns, like the Blue Castle Power Plant in Southern Utah.

The second half of the hour is Science Questions, the beginning of a two-part series titled, "In the state of Mental Breakdown" discussing the overhaul of the Valley Mental Health system.

Science Questions profiles the oil and gas industry, particularly the technique called horizontal hydraulic fracturing. It's like a modern-day gold rush and it is breaking new ground in pockets all over the nation bringing jobs and money to the towns near you.

Today on Access Utah, Sheri Quinn explores a future where gasoline is obsolete and cars run on electrically charged roadways. BMW engineer Jesse Schnieder is on an international task force that is setting the standards for the next generation of electric cars.

At 9:30, Science Questions profiles the oil and gas industry, particularly the technique called horizontal hydraulic fracturing. It's like a modern-day gold rush and it is breaking new ground in pockets all over the nation bringing jobs and money to the towns near you.

Copyright Tyler Nordgren

Saturday is World Astronomy Day and we're celebrating by spending the whole hour hanging out with astronomers.

First up is Tyler Nordgren, astronomer and Assistant Professor of Physics at University of the Redlands in California. He visited 12 national parks in one year, photographing the stars in order to create the book Skies Above, Earth Below: A Guide to Astronomy in the National Parks.

Get ready for a live Science Questions, when Sheri Quinn learns all about the end of the world from astronomer Phil Plait. Will a coronal mass ejection and solar flares knock out half the Earth's power and leave millions in the cold? Will a huge asteroid strike the Earth and send us the way of the dinosaurs? Perhaps our planet will be sucked into a giant black hole. Scariest of all could be supernovae close enough to cause mass extinction.

SQ Radio introduces us to the brand new Molecular Biotechnology Lab on the University of Utah campus, where interdisciplinary research teams will collaborate to advance big areas in science like nanotechnology, renewable energy, early disease detection, and geochemistry.

Then they profile a USTAR - USU Energy Dynamics Lab project called Intuitive Building, where engineers are developing software and devices that essentially decode an office room scene in order to light it based on the occupants' daily patterns and preferences. The wave of the future!

 

Science questions reveals new research on the effects of environmental toxins and autism and the legal and ethical implications of human diseases caused by environmental exposures. 

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