Sheri Quinn

Program Producer, Science Questions

Sheri Quinn has been doing science radio for the past twelve years. She started the very first science radio program in Utah in 1999, and since has produced multiple national and international broadcasts, including producing an audio series on the Aché in Paraguay and efforts to save the last remnants of the Atlantic Rain Forest.  She is a veteran reporter who has interviewed numerous world-leading scholars, corresponding for Voice of America and NPR.

americanspace.com

Welcome to Access Utah...The aerospace industry has been in the headlines recently with events such as the Space X launch of their Falcon 9 rocket this week, the announcement from the company Mars One revealing the 705 semi-finalist for the colonization of the planet Mars, and the recent merger of Orbital Science and ATK. 

Utah State University/Utah Division of Air Quality

Cache Valley air quality has been getting a lot of attention the last several years.  A few days a year, usually in the wintertime, the air pollution in Logan is worse than most other U.S. cities.  On Friday's AU, Sheri Quinn talks to Utah State University environmental engineer Dr. Randy Martin about his current research on the major air pollution culprit, PM2.5  


Penguin Press

According to University of Utah anthropologist Ryan Shot, men want commitment when women are scarce. In his new study published in the Royal Society Open Science Journal, he challenges the sexual stereotype that women want commitment and men want commitment only sometimes.  His study of the Makushi in Guyana shows mate choice is much more complex. He found men are more likely to seek long-term relationships when women are in short supply. 

 In the second half of Friday's Access Utah, Sheri Quinn examines the possibilities of reporting on the United States' Central Intelligence Agency. She speaks with New York Times Reporter Mark Mazzetti, author of "The Way of the Knife: The CIA, a Secret Army, and a War at the Ends of the Earth." Mazzetti discusses the process of U.S.-targeted killings, and other details, of our country's most secretive agency.

www.ut.water.usgs.gov

The Great Salt Lake is so big, it is visible from outer space.  This so-called "Dead Sea" is a Utah gem and is teeming with life.  It hosts millions of migratory shore birds, hordes of aquatic insects, algae and of course brine shrimp. 

On Friday's AU Sheri Quinn talks with Utah State University ecologists Wayne Wurtsbaugh & Nancy Huntly about the lake and Friday night's Science Unwrapped lecture featuring the Great Salt Lake. 

peoplebehindthescience.com

On Access Utah today we have Dr. Hope Jahren, Professor of Geobiology at University of Hawaii Manoa.  

Jahren’s research focuses on living and fossil organisms, and how they are chemically linked to the global environment. Using measurements of the stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen her group is working to learn about metabolism and environment, both in the Human environment, and through Geologic Time.

Dr. Jahren will be giving two lectures as part of the USU Ecology Center Seminar Series titled “Global Change and Your Dinner Plate” and "What Can the Carbon Isotope

Composition of Plant Tissue Tell Us?"

Then on SQ: we revisit a program looking at the theological implications of marijuana...

pageresource.com

Paleontologist Kenneth Carpenter is the museum director of the Utah State University Eastern Prehistoric Museum and author or co-author of several books on dinosaurs and Mesozoic life. His main research interests are armored dinosaurs as well as the Early Cretaceous dinosaurs from the Cedar Mountain Formation in eastern Utah. He joins us on Friday’s Access Utah.

Then Science Questions takes a look at autism with Temple Grandin. 

sites.psu.edu

Temple Grandin is noted for autism and for her groundbreaking work on many of the nation's slaughterhouses - making them more humane.  She is Professor of Animal Science at Colorado State University and has authored numerous books and papers on autism and agriculture.  On Science Questions, she discusses the latest brain research on autism.  


dosomething.org

One in 30 children in U.S. are homeless according to new report by national center of family homelessness released this week. Today on the program author Walter Biondi joins host Sheri Quinn to discuss what its like being a homeless teen in America  and how he was able to go from a street kid to a U.S. Interpol Chief and author. 


worldstemcells.com

Science Questions explores imprinted brain theory, which proposes that autism spectrum disorder represents a paternal bias in the expression of imprinted genes.


USDA

The Greater Sage-Grouse is an iconic symbol of the American West.  They thrive in healthy sagebrush ecosystems in prime grazing land. Their population numbers are declining in states across the west.  Utah has a population of roughly 20,000 Greater Sage-Grouse and efforts are currently underway to work with private land owners to help protect the bird and preserve the environments they inhabit. An international forum about wildlife management of the Greater Sage-Grouse is taking place in Salt Lake City today and Friday. 

On Thursday’s AU, Sheri Quinn talks to a 5th generation rancher who grew up with sage-grouse, and USU wildlife biologist Terry Messmer, who conducts research on the biology and natural history of this famous Utah bird.

Then Science Questions at 9:30 AM

penguinbooks.co.za

This week on Science Questions intern, Hope Mckinny, talks to Nelson Mandela's former private secretary, Zelda LaGrange, about her new book, a memoir titled "Good Morning Mr. Mandela".  LaGrange offers insight into what being one of the world's most revered individuals was like.

siarchives.si.edu

The Smithsonian Institution houses a vast collection of artifacts from across the nation and around the world.  What can all of these items tell us about American culture and history?  Friday on Access Utah, Richard Kurin, Under Secretary for History, Art, and Culture at the Smithsonian, joins Sheri Quinn for a discussion about the stories they reveal.  At 9:30 Science Questions explores marijuana policy through the lens of a theologian. 


huffingtonpost.com

At 9:30 Science Questions explores marijuana policy through the lens of a theologian.

Recreational marijuana became legal  in the state of Colorado for those 21 and older in 2014.  Washington and others states are preparing to follow suit.  Today on the program we explore the effects, from a theological perspective, that marijuana policies have had on society.  The Reverend Susan Brooks Thistlethwait, Ph. D joins us.

earthtimes.org

Logan has some of the worst air in the nation several days many years.  On Friday’s AU, USU Professor of Toxicology, Roger Coulombe, talks to host Sheri Quinn about Cache Valley air and what is being done to help clean it up so we can all breathe a little easier.   

At 9:30 Science Questions explores the downwind effects of nuclear testing in Nevada and Utah in the 1950s and the science of nuclear bombs with one of the nation's first female chemists.   

Utah State University biologist Zachariah Gompert asks questions about evolution that have been eluding scientists for decades and he and colleagues are using the flood of new genetic tools to find clues to one of their main questions - is evolution predictable and repeatable? Sheri Quinn talks to Professor Gompert about his study recently published in the journal Science.  

Today on the program Science Questions presents a two-part program about autism and the brain from cutting edge scientists Temple Grandin and Christopher Badcock. They each approach autism from different disciplines and perspectives and shed new light on the spectrum disorder that is increasingly in the spotlight.  


On Science Questions, producers Sheri Quinn and Suzi Montgomery explore marijuana policies and the long-term effects they have had on the U.S prison system...through the lens of theology from writer Reverend Dr. Susan Thistlewaite.  

twitter.com @Emma_Marris

 It is Natural Resources Week at Utah State University and the theme is "Go Wild, It's All Around you."  Nature writer Emma Marris was a featured speaker during this week's celebration and she joins us today on the program to talk about the latest wave in conservation and her new book, The Rambunctious Garden, that is changing and challenging our traditional views of conservation.  


Today on the program, Science Questions presents this special on the work of scientist Wolf Reik. He is Professor of Epigenetics at the University of Cambridge and currently studies how additional information can be added to the genome through processes called epigenetics. He made key discoveries that are important for mammalian development, physiology, genome reprogramming, and human diseases. Today producer's Sheri Quinn and Suzi Montgomery explore his work and its significance to the expanding field of epigenetics. 


Today on the program, we talk to former oil industry geologist Marc Deshowitch about the geology of Utah's national parks and the ancient history of oil.  Deshowitch, who is based in St. George, now gives guided tours of Utah's parks and presentations on light pollution and the benefits of preserving our night skies.

environnment.unr.edu

Today on the program we explore the connection between fire, prehistory, and biodiversity with researchers in Nevada who reviewed anecdotal and anthropological data on the historical uses of fire in the Great Basin. Their literature review revealed how lessons learned from the uses of fire hundreds and thousands of years ago can improve modern land management practices. 

citizensinspace.com

NASA and a team of four aerospace companies are ready for two missions that will propel humans into outer space. The space shuttle launch and Orion rocket are ready for launch towards deep space starting in early fall this year. 


Today on the program author Teresa Small from the Shoshone-Bannock tribe in Southeastern Idaho joins us to talk about her book "How To Love An Addict."  It is a detailed personal account of her experience coping with a meth addicted son.  Rather than write another  tragic story, she says she chose to instead write her story as a "how to manual" for anyone wanting to change the situation they are in with an addict.  


wyolife.com

 

One of the most talked about species in Utah these days is the Greater Sage Grouse. This native, chicken-like bird, is at the forefront of controversy due to its unique mating ritual and its dwindling numbers in the west. As a result of its disappearance, the federal government is considering listing it is an endangered species, the state of Utah would like to avoid this and protect the bird on its own terms. Today on the program Sheri Quinn talks to USU Sage Grouse expert Dr. Terry Mesmer about the plight of this controversial bird.

Then Science Questions explores the internationally recognized public toilet system in India. It’s simplicity will amaze you. 


lookingatthewest.com

On today's Encore presentation of Access Utah, Sheri Quinn meets with Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment, a group of over 300 medical doctors, last year declared an air-pollution public health emergency on Capitol Hill. The problem has been so bad that it drew a crowd of about 5,000 citizens to the State Capitol in late January, now regarded as the largest air-pollution-specific protest in U.S. history.  Today, Dr. Roger Coulombe, professor of Toxicology at Utah State University, talks to Sheri Quinn about the side effects of bad in Cache Valley. 


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