Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

The fourth winter storm in the Northeast this year was adding to the 6 feet of snow already on the ground in some areas, bringing with it hurricane-force winds and near-white-out conditions.

In Massachusetts, Gov. Charlie Baker said at a news conference early today that snowfalls had already "significantly exceeded" expectations. Accumulation in the northern half of the state exceeded a foot in some places.

The cease-fire in eastern Ukraine appears to be largely holding — at least for the moment, defying skepticism that the second truce in six-months between government forces and Russian-backed separatists might immediately collapse.

The cease-fire went into effect at midnight Sunday (Saturday at 5 p.m. ET).

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which keeps a 24/7 vigil on the sun, just released this spectacular video composite to mark five years since the spacecraft was launched.

Updates at 11:15 p.m. ET: One shooting victim dies

The Associated Press is reporting that one of the three shooting victims outside of the Copenhagen synagogue has died.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET: A second shooting in Copenhagen

Danish police say gunfire near a Copenhagen synagogue left one person shot in the head and two police officers injured, Reuters reports.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

Police in Canada say they've foiled a Valentine's Day plot to carry out a mass shooting at a mall in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Dan Karpenchuk, reporting from Toronto for NPR, reports that one person was found dead and three others taken into custody on Friday by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in connection with the alleged plot, which authorities say was not related to Islamic terrorism. The suspects reportedly planned to kill as many people as possible before committing suicide.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

A winter storm that has already dumped up to 8 inches of snow in parts of Michigan is set to bring blizzard conditions to much of the Northeast this weekend.

According to The Weather Channel, brutal winds, bitterly cold temperatures and lots of snow along the Eastern Seaboard from Long Island to Maine. New York and Philadelphia are among the cities under winter weather advisories.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

Ukrainian forces and Russian-backed separatists traded artillery fire today in the hours leading up to a cease-fire deal that went into effect at midnight (5 p.m. ET). A few seconds after the cease-fire officially began, Reuters reported, shelling abruptly stopped in the eastern city of Donetsk. A Russia Today correspondent in Donetsk called the region "eerily calm" after midnight.

President Obama today described as "brutal and outrageous" the murders of three young Muslims who were gunned down in North Carolina earlier this week, saying no one in the U.S. should be targeted for their religion.

Utah's GOP-controlled House of Representatives narrowly approved a proposal to bring back the state's use of firing squads for executions, but the measure faces an uncertain reception in the Senate.

The 39-34 vote Friday came as missing lawmakers were rounded up to break a deadlock. The firing squad was discontinued in 2004.

The Associated Press says leaders in the Republican-controlled Senate won't say whether they will support the measure and Utah Gov. Gary Herbert, also a Republican, has not said if he will sign it.

What happens when today's high-tech data storage systems become tomorrow's floppy discs?

Google Vice President Vint Cerf is concerned about the answer and its implications for preserving history. Speaking at an annual conference of top American scientists, Cerf described such a loss of important information as a possible "digital Dark Ages."

Suspected Boko Haram militants have conducted their first-ever raid in Chad, attacking a village just across the border from the extremist group's stronghold in northeast Nigeria.

Reuters says the assault took place about 12 miles east of the border at the village of Ngouboua inside Chad, which, like Nigeria, is a Muslim-majority country with a substantial Christian minority.

Something's definitely going on at NASA. We're thinking someone in the public relations department is trying to blow the dust off the space agency's ever-serious image.

First there was the photo below, deemed by almost anyone with a pulse as unquestionably the best astronaut portrait ever:

And now, the Expedition 45 crew, scheduled to go to the International Space Station in September, is having fun with Jedi robes and light sabers:

In perhaps a further sign of the decline of the American shopping mall, the lights suddenly flickered out today in the Rotterdam Mall in upstate New York after the electric utility cut power for non-payment.

In a statement issued by National Grid, the utility said it "has been working with the owners of the Rotterdam [Square] Mall for several months to set up a payment plan that would benefit both the mall and National Grid.

Scientists are warning that construction of a $50-billion interoceanic shipping canal through Nicaragua could spell an environmental disaster, threatening nearly two-dozen endangered species and jeopardizing Central America's largest source of drinking water.

Pope Francis said that couples who opt not to have children are being "selfish" as he spoke of a "greedy generation" that's choosing not to procreate. The pontiff's remarks come just weeks after he seemed to send a contradictory message, telling Catholics that they don't need to breed "like rabbits."

Days after some 300 would-be migrants from North Africa drowned in the Mediterranean Sea as they were trying to reach Italy, the United Nations is calling on the European Union to establish a broader search-and-rescue effort to avoid future tragedies.

U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres reiterated a call for the EU to expand its current operation, known as Triton, to locate and rescue would-be illegal migrants from Africa.

Two Al-Jazeera English journalists awaiting retrial in Egypt on charges they aided the banned Muslim Brotherhood, have been released on bail amid expectations that one of them, a Canadian, might soon be deported.

Update 6:10 p.m. ET Launch Scrubbed

At t-minus 2 minutes and 26 seconds to launch, the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket was scrubbed due to an issue with the system used to track the rocket. The team will review the issue and calculate the next available launch window in order to reschedule.

Our original post continues below:

Future beauty pageant contestants might want to be careful with all that loose talk about "world peace," unless they're willing to put up: after Miss Universe Paulina Vega expressed a desire to help end her native Colombia's 50-year civil war, she received an invitation from FARC rebels to join truce talks.

Egypt says that it will retry two journalists working for Al-Jazeera English who have been jailed for more than a year on charges of "giving a platform" to the banned Muslim Brotherhood. The announcement of the new trial, set to begin on Feb. 12, comes days after the journalists' colleague, Australian Peter Greste, was suddenly released and deported.

Men's basketball coach Dean Smith, who coached the University of North Carolina Tar Heels for more than 35 years, taking them to two national titles, has died at age 83.

The Hall of Famer died Saturday night at his home, his family said in a statement released today.

"We are grateful for all the thoughts and prayers, and appreciate the continued respect for our privacy as arrangements are made available to the public. Thank you," the statement said.

Hoping to salvage something of a widely ignored truce in eastern Ukraine that was forged just months ago, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other leaders are set for another summit in Minsk this week.

If all goes to plan, Merkel will join Russian President Vladimir Putin, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko and French President Francois Hollande in the capital of Belarus on Wednesday.

An upstart anti-corruption party appeared headed for victory in elections for a new government in the Indian capital, defeating the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party of Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

NPR's Julie McCarthy, reporting from New Delhi, tells our Newscast unit that if the exit polls prove correct, "it would be a humiliating loss ... for Modi."

The premier's "lavish campaign appearances made the race for Delhi's local assembly seem like a referendum on his own national leadership," she says.

Brian Williams — the NBC Nightly News anchor who apologized earlier this week for misremembering that a military helicopter he was in during the 2003 invasion of Iraq had been fired upon — says he has temporarily taken himself off the air over the controversy.

The United Arab Emirates, which briefly suspended its participation in Arab airstrikes against the self-declared Islamic State after a Jordanian pilot shot down over Syria was executed by extremists, says it will rejoin the effort.

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