Kerry Bringhurst

News Director | Host, Morning Edition

At 14-years-old, Kerry began working as a reporter for KVEL “The Hot One” in Vernal, Utah.  Her radio news interests led her to Logan where she became news director for KBLQ while attending Utah State University.  She graduated USU with a degree in Broadcast Journalism and spent the next few years working for Utah Public Radio.  Leaving UPR in 1993 she spent the next 14 years as the full time mother of four boys before returning in 2007.  Kerry and her husband Boyd reside in Nibley.

Ways To Connect

The Utah Symphony and Utah Opera will present their yearly concert for members of the community who are often limited when it comes to enjoying cultural opportunities this week.

It was during a board meeting 14 years ago that the CEO of the Utah Symphony and Orchestra was asked by a father to help find a way to include families and their special needs children so they could have access to music and performances without worrying about being disruptive.

"He had a son with Autism and he said one of the things that our family needs is a cultural event we can attend together," said Paula Fowler, the director of education and community outreach for the Utah Symphony and Utah Opera.

Fowler said the father was concerned the public thought families with special needs children couldn't control their children.

Ogden School District

Millions of Americans will voice their support for educational opportunity during the fourth-annual National School Choice Week, which begins on Jan. 26. An unprecedented 5,500 events across all 50 states will be taking place between Jan. 26 and Feb. 1.

Andrew Campanella is the president of National School Choice Week, and said the events will be held within individual communities around the country.

"We're looking at everything from rallies to round-table discussions, movie screenings. People getting together in individual homes and community centers, and talking about making good choices for their children, the options they have. Families in Utah have a lot of options. They do have school choice," Campanella said.

School choice means parents deciding how their children are educated- through all forms of education.
 


A new Center for Workforce Development facility has opened in Price. The 5,000 square foot renovated building is located on the Utah State University Eastern campus.

USU Eastern Chancellor Joe Peterson welcomed the community and students to the new facility during a ceremony Wednesday. He said the workforce development program is designed to give students training for jobs that are in demand.

"Companies around southeast Utah are always eager to hire people who are skilled in CAD programs like automotive mechanics, diesel mechanics, welding and those kinds of things," Peterson said.

www.airquality.utah.gov

A climate change lobbying group with chapters in the United States and Canada is hoping to expand into Northern Utah. Citizens Climate Lobby engages non-partisan lobbying for a federal tax on carbon-based fuels.

“We think this market-based, revenue neutral approach stands the best chance of appealing to both liberals and conservatives in making its way through Congress and into law,” said Ben Mates, a member of the CCL group in Salt Lake City.


Parents of students attending schools in Cache County can participate in a new communication system.  The Alert Solutions Power Announcement system is a way for district administrators, teachers and staff to inform parents about events and happenings at their students' school.

Cache County School District personnel said the announcement system will alert parents of school closures, attendance records, general announcements and possible emergency situations.

Parents can also access information about grades and school forms by using a protected password.

Sign up for the Cache County School Districts Alert service.

A group of clean air advocates has resolved to organize a rally that would be the Utah’s largest. The group hopes to use public pressure to persuade state Lawmakers to address their concerns about what they say is a lack of Utah policy needed to address air quality concerns.

When Tom Bennett of Georgia travels he takes along his guitar and makes music. Bennett is a folk musician who has settled along Utah’s Wasatch Front.

“I love the west,” said Bennett. “I have traveled most places and decided to settle here because I found it to be the most beautiful state.”

It used to be that Bennett traveled through Salt Lake on a bicycle but now he is forced to use public transportation to get to and from work because he said he can’t physically handle the state’s poor air quality.

“Last winter I suffered an 80 percent loss of hearing because my sinuses were so infected from breathing bad air,” he said.

On Monday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ranked northern Utah and parts of central California as having the country's worst air.

The Utah chapter of the National Young Women’s Christian Association is encouraging women to consider running for public office.  

According to the Center for American Women and Politics, women make up half of the population of the state of Utah.  Currently there are only 17 out of the 104 Utah lawmakers serving in the state house and senate who are women. That gives Utah the ranking of 46th in the nation.

“There are efforts going on around the country to encourage women to run for political office,” said Anne Burkholder of YWCA-Utah. “We need to take special effort to engage them.  They have a right to be at the table where decision are made that effect their lives and the lives of their families and their communities.”

Utah Governor Gary Herbert will select one of three GOP candidates to become the states next Attorney General.  The state republican central committee met over the weekend and has forwarded  the names of Sean Reyes, Robert Smith and Brian Tarbet.
UPR's Kerry Bringhurst has been following the Utah Democratic Party's response to the process of selecting Utah's top law enforcer. 

As soon as John Swallow announced he would resign as Utah's Attorney General, Utah democrats began pushing for a replacement process that state party chairman Jim Dabakis said would involve candidates who "are outside the business as usual politics of capitol hill."

The democratic party dedicated a webpage to Utahns, giving them the opportunity to nominate candidates who Dabakis said have broad respect in the community, and are as diverse as the people of Utah.

"What we wanted to show was what would happen if the people of Utah were able to actually pick the next interim Attorney General and the difference that there would be," Dabakis said.

There were 276 responses 72 hours. The public's recommendation for candidates to be included in the next AG search are Supreme Court Justice Christine Durham and former LDS church historian Marlin Jensen.

The search for Utah's Attorney General continues. Utah  Republican Party leaders will meet Saturday to recommend candidates to replace former AG John Swallow.

The Utah Republican Central Committee will meet to select three of the seven Republican candidates to be considered by Utah Governor Gary Herbert to become Utah's new Attorney General.

Speaking on UPR's Access Utah program, Sen. Jim Dabakis (D-2) said he is not comfortable with the process.

"Some of them (candidates) have real specific problems with connection to Mr. Swallow,"  Dabakis said. "We are going to end up with the same old thing and the same old characters.  It is reprehensible that we are in this position now."

Spencer Cox, Lt. Governor,
LT. GOVERNOR'S OFFICE

Utah's new Lieutenant Governor, Spencer Cox, spent part of Thursday in Brigham City touring a robotics facility.  The tour of Autoliv Northern America included students interested in robotics training.

There are 80 Autoliv facilities producing airbag and other automotive safety products in 29 countries.  One of those facilities is located in the Northern Utah farming community of Brigham City.
Cox toured the Autoliv manufacturing facility along with students from the Bridgerland Applied Technology College.


Residents living in Cache County will see an increase in their property tax rates in 2014. The tax increase and money pulled from county reserves will be used to fund the $46 million dollar budget.

The council had originally recommended a 10 percent property tax increase to fund road, water, and mental health projects in Cache County.  County Chair Val Potter said he is not in favor of increasing taxes at any level, but make a vote of compromise when the final budget request included a 5 percent tax increase instead.  

"There is unnecessary spending, but to put your finger on it in the specific departments and decide what services we keep and what services we don't keep is what the county council is having trouble with in deciding where to make cuts," Potter said.


music
UINTAH BASIN / UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY

The Uintah Basin Orchestra and Chorus will present a concert Friday, December 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the Vernal Middle School Auditorium.  Conducted by Utah State University Music Department Head, Dr. James M. Bankhead, the UBOC was organized in November.

One hundred and sixty residents from Roosevelt and Vernal will perform holiday selections including Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring, John Rutter’s Candelight Carol and Shepherd’s Pipe Carol, and arrangements from Mack Wilberg.

Creating an orchestra and chorus was the idea of USU’s Uintah Basin Dean Boyd Edwards and other musicians who wanted to bring music to the basin.  An increasing number of families are moving to Eastern Utah to fill positions that have opened because of the oil and gas industry surge. 

Families USA

A national report released by the non-profit health consumers organization, Families USA, shows the majority of Americans with individual health coverage will qualify for premium subsidies under the Affordable Care Act, or ACA.

“The overwhelming majority of people with private, individual health insurance today will soon be able to receive better coverage and pay lower premiums due to the Affordable Care Act,” said Families USA Executive Director Ron Pollack.

Approximately 15.2 million people – 5.7 percent of the non-elderly population – receive their health coverage through private, individual (non-group) health plans.  Pollack said a portion of this group has become the center of a controversy about whether or not Americans can keep their health coverage under the ACA.

Jack and Sally Keller, Jack Keller
SALLY KELLER / UTAH PUBLIC RADIO

Stored in the Fife Folklore Archives on the Utah State University campus are seven boxes containing information and oral history recordings from 39 members of Cache Community Connections.  Among those recordings are comments from long time Utah Public Radio friend and member Jack Keller who spoke about his years volunteering with the Northern Utah religious and civic community organization.

Craig Petersen mayor
Craig Petersen

Craig Petersen was elected Logan City Mayor on Tuesday, beating incumbent Randy Watts 2,504 to 2,100 votes. In his new position, Petersen said he plans to begin reviewing city policies and procedures.

"I went from conducting a campaign to being mayor-elect overnight," said Peterson. "It's kind of an abrupt transition to realize it really happened."

Petersen’s campaign platform focused on plans to improve the quality of life of those living in Logan.  Reducing traffic congestion, revising city policies to make them more business friendly, and addressing sidewalk and rental issues are matters Petersen said he will address now that he has been elected.

diamond interchange, brigham city, utah
UDOT / UDOT

Drivers to and from Cache Valley who access Sardine Canyon through Brigham City have until Monday to make the trip without construction delay. The Utah Department of Transportation is scheduled to begin a major reconstruction project on Nov. 11.

Travel from I-15 at US-91 on 1100 South will be interrupted as road crews work to construct a diverging diamond interchange that will include two bridges which will access the interstate ramps.

Maob information center
MOAB INFORMATION CENTER

National Park Service employees in Grand County are winterizing park campgrounds and trails after an unusual 2013 fall season. The financial costs of the unexpected partial shutdown of the Federal Government in October are still being felt by communities that cater to tourists.

It is estimated Utah suffered a loss of $30 million in tourism money. The impact of the closure is still being felt by employees of the state's national parks who are trying to catch up on work that piled up during the shutdown.

LDS.org

In 1913 the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints became the first organization in the nation to establish boy scout troops. Tuesday night Utah’s largest religious denomination held a celebration honoring the partnership between the LDS Church and a service program that has touched the lives of millions of boys.

The LDS Church marked the centennial with a stage spectacular where members of the Boys Scouts of America repelled from the rafters of the LDS Conference Center in Salt Lake City. Rope courses and fire outlook stations were constructed to accommodate the cast.

Preparations are underway for a traditional festival in Grand County.  Moab’s 8th Annual Pumpkin’ Chuckin’ Festival on Saturday, Oct. 26, will feature the traditional community faire of food, music, and games. Unlike other family friendly events, this one will also include the tossing, smashing, and flinging of a popular seasonal squash - the pumpkin.

“We are going to have a ton of kid’s activities," said Delite Primus, Executive Director of Moab’s Youth Garden Project. "There is so much out here for kids to do."

Daniel and Bunny McArthur tell the story of their experiences in childbirth. Then, after the youngest of 6 children was in kindergarten, Bunny decided to finish college- at the same time as 3 of her children.

"All the rest of our children were miracle babies. Jeff was 3 weeks early, we didn't know anything wrong," Daniel said.

Mike Empey speaks with his friend Glenn Rogers about what he has learned as a member of the Shivwits Band of Paiutes. Rogers remembers spending his early years getting an education in a small community where he was a minority. He continues to work with Paiute Indians to help educate and improve the quality of life on the reservation.


StoryCorps, Antone Bringhurst, luzon bringhurst, wayne bringhurst
STORYCORPS

The children of Hilda and Leo Bringhurst share stories of growing up in Toquerville, Utah between 1930 and the 1950’s.  Luzon, Wayne, and Antone Bringhurst remember working on the family farm and reading with their mother.

Carl and Shari Berger have been married almost 55 years, and it's been a good run.

What Carl calls "one of the most exciting and most stressful and most interesting years, was that one year in 1997."

While returning from a trip to New Orleans, Carl started pacing in the airport. What started as a need to walk soon turned into something very different.

SOUTHERN UTAH WILDERNESS ALLIANCE

A new report lists 12 destinations as "Too Wild to Drill" for oil and gas, for their proximity to national parks and wilderness areas. Compiled by The Wilderness Society, it includes Arches National Park near Moab and the Desolation Canyon area near Vernal.

Oil and gas companies already have leased more than 38-million acres of public land, and a new report says there's no need for them to target other parcels that adjoin national parks and areas with wilderness, historic and recreation values.

As the debate over the purpose and programs in a new 500-billion-dollar farm bill drags on in Congress, a survey of people in rural areas shows most believe the federal government isn't paying much attention to their needs.

A poll commissioned by the Center for Rural Affairs says eight out of 10 rural voters believe the feds ought to be backing infrastructure projects to revitalize small towns, investing in better water and sewer systems, roads, and bridges.


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