Elaine Taylor

5:30 News Co-host / Reporter

After graduating with a B.S. in Anthropology from the University of Utah, Elaine developed a love of radio while working long hours in remote parts of Utah as an archaeological field technician. She eventually started interning for the radio show Science Questions and fell completely in love with the medium. Elaine is currently taking classes at Utah State University in preparation for medical school applications. She is a host of UPR’s All Things Considered and a science writer for the Utah Agricultural Experiment Station. Elaine hopes to bring her experiences living abroad in Turkey and Austria into her work.

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Utah Science
6:26 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Students To Take First Glimpse Of High Atmospheric Winds

Scientists are using the principals of the Doppler effect to understand winds in the upper atmosphere.
Credit Utah State University

Undergraduate researchers from Utah State University will soon be attaching an experiment that has been years in the making onto a balloon the size of a stadium. USU was selected to take part in a new NASA initiative that aims to get students involved in research that could make a real impact on the scientific community.

Student Team Leader and System Engineer Landon Terry describes what the experiment looks like.

“Well, it’s about a foot and a half by a foot by about a foot tall and it looks like kind of a shoe box,” said Terry.

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Utah News
6:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Utah Will Appeal Same-Sex Marriage Ruling To Supreme Court

Utah's decision to appeal an earlier decision on the state's gay marriage ban came on the same day a group of citizens delivered a petition in favor of marriage equality to the Governor's Mansion.
Credit seattle.gov

 Utah will be taking the fight over gay marriage to the U.S. Supreme Court. The state attorney general’s office announced Wednesday it would be challenging a June 25 ruling from a federal appeals court. The statement said Attorney General Sean Reyes has a duty to defend state laws, and that Amendment 3 would be presumed constitutional unless the Supreme Court decides otherwise.

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Utah Environment
6:21 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Cedar City Building Fence To Keep Prairie Dogs Off The Green

Cedar City is building a specialized fence around the golf course to keep federally protected prairie dogs from digging into the green.
Credit U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Utah Prairie Dog was first listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1973. It remains listed as ‘threatened’ today, meaning residents of its native territory have had to come up with creative ways of keeping the rodent out of prime burrowing habitat.

“Prairie dogs are all over Iron County and there are many on the public golf course and many in the Cedar City cemetery,” said Rick Holman, city manager for Cedar City.

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Utah News
6:32 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

Nut Lovers Mourn Ice Cream Drought

Nutty flavors such as maple nut could be in short supply at Aggie Ice Cream if the California drought continues.
Credit Aggie Ice Cream

Nut lovers may have a hard time getting ahold of their favorite ice cream flavors at Aggie Ice Cream this summer. The Logan based creamery announced some flavors may be in limited supply due to the ongoing drought in California that has been hurting nut growers in parts of the state.

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Utah News
6:35 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Gardeners Can Give To Meet Growing Demand For Food

Local growers and gardeners can donate extra produce to local food pantries.
Credit Elaine Taylor

Though it’s not the traditional season of giving, food banks across the state are in need, and local gardeners could be part of the answer. According to the Utah Food Bank’s Heidi Cannella, demand for food is actually at its highest in the summer.

“We have our summer business food drive in the summer because kids are out of school without access to school meal programs, but donations are at their lowest,” said Cannella. “It’s actually a very critical time for us.”

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Utah News
6:25 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Historic Crash Site Memorialized As National Landmark

The 128 passengers of two planes which crashed above the Grand Canyon 58 years ago are being memorialized this week.
Credit http://grandcanyonhistory.clas.asu.edu/sites_coloradorivercorridor_1956crash.html / Arizona State University

The TWA-United Midair collision of 1956 happened 58 years ago Monday above the Grand Canyon. The crash between a Trans World Airlines Super Constellation aircraft and a United Airlines DC-7 killed 128 people and sparked the creation of the Federal Aviation Administration.

Grand Canyon National Park’s Kirby-Lynn Shedlowski said the crash was one of a number of tragic accidents that lead to federal hearings, creating the FAA and initiating the use of radar and black boxes, technology not present in the two aircraft.

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Utah Environment
6:22 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Drought Disaster Declared Statewide

91 percent of the state is experiencing dry or drought conditions.
Credit drought.gov

All 29 Utah Counties are now included on the disaster declaration list from the U.S. Department of Agriculture due to ongoing drought across the West.

In a letter to Gov. Gary Herbert earlier this week, U.S. Agricultural Secretary Tom Vilsack informed state officials that Uintah and Duchesne counties were added to the list. They were the only two counties not included before the change.

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Utah Politics
6:17 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Utah's Gay Marriage Ban Struck Down By Circuit Court

The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed an earlier decision by Judge Shelby striking down Utah's gay marriage ban.
Credit seattle.gov

On Wednesday, the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a decision from a Utah judge striking down the state’s gay marriage ban. 

Six months after the state appealed Judge Shelby’s ruling, which found Utah’s ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional, a three-judge panel from the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the lower court's decision in a 2-1 ruling. However, with the ruling, the court put an immediate stay on the decision.

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Utah Science
6:21 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Research Shines Light On Gardening Question

The efficiency of lights used for growing home gardens and crops has changed in recent years, leaving many to wonder which lamps to use.
Credit epa.org

Though the sun is still the primary source of light for most gardeners, many rely on electric lights some of the time. But varying claims on the efficiency of these lights from different manufacturers has left many growers confused about which products to use, according to Bruce Bugbee.

Bugbee, a professor in Utah State University’s College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences, along with graduate student Jacob Nelson decided to look into these claims, publishing an article on the topic in the journal PLOS ONE.

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Utah Science
6:37 pm
Fri June 20, 2014

Dino Goes Digital, Scientists Map Wall Of Bones

Dan Chure and Brooks Britt on the wall of bones.
Credit Dinosaur National Monument

Scientists from Brigham Young University and Dinosaur National Monument have teamed up to map the famous “wall of bones,” a sandstone slab containing more than a thousand dinosaur fossils.

Using a laser scanner and photogrammetry, Brooks Britt, a BYU professor and paleontologist, is working to put together the most accurate model of the wall since 1936.

Over the years, fossils of dinosaurs dating back 150 million years to the late Jurassic have been removed from the 5,000 square foot wall.

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