Dina Temple-Raston

Dina Temple-Raston is NPR's counter-terrorism correspondent and has been reporting from all over the world for the network's news magazines since 2007.

She recently completed a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University where she studied the intersection of Big Data and intelligence.

Prior to NPR, Temple-Raston was a longtime foreign correspondent for Bloomberg News in Asia and served as Bloomberg's White House correspondent during the Clinton Administration. She has written four books, including The Jihad Next Door: Rough Justice in the Age of Terror, about the Lackawanna Six terrorism case. She is a frequent contributor to the PBS Newshour, a regular reviewer of national security books for the Washington Post Book World, and also contributes to the New Yorker, WNYC's Radiolab, the TLS, and the Columbia Journalism Review, among others.

She is a graduate of Northwestern University and Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, and she has an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Manhattanville College.

CIA Director John Brennan told an audience at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York today that the self-proclaimed Islamic State, or ISIS, is facing dissension in its ranks and is finding it hard to govern the territory it controls. These are the same problems terrorist groups that try to govern have faced in the past. The director was cautiously optimistic that the group, which stormed across Syria and Iraq last summer and has held much of the territory it captured since then, is...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: Now a development in a story we heard on this program last week. NPR's Dina Temple-Raston told us about an 18-year-old Minnesota man arrested for trying to join ISIS. Today he entered a guilty plea and, as Dina reports, began to explain why he wanted to join the group. DINA TEMPLE-RASTON, BYLINE: In his plea agreement, Abdullahi Yusuf told prosecutors that last spring he and a handful of his friends...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: All across Europe, there's new attention to homegrown terrorism. Thousands of Europeans have traveled to Syria to fight. The concern is that when they return, they aren't back to resume their lives, but, instead, are dispatched by al-Qaida or the so-called Islamic State to attack the West. NPR's Dina Temple-Raston traveled to Paris to report on this phenomenon. And today, she looks at how serious the...

Among the sweeping changes France is proposing in the aftermath of this month's terrorist attacks in Paris are new measures to fight Islamic radicalization in its prisons. It is an enormous problem brought into starker relief because two of the suspects in the attacks earlier this month were products of the French penal system. Cherif Kouachi, one of the brothers behind the attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo , went from petty criminal to violent jihadist after just 20 months behind bars....

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: This morning we're exploring the road to radicalization through the life of one man, Cherif Kouachi. He's one of the two brothers who attacked the offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris. Their journey to that moment began more than a decade ago. The brothers began as small-time criminals and became violent jihadis. Theirs is a textbook case of radicalization, as we'll hear from NPR's Dina Temple-Raston. She...

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: The director of the FBI offered new evidence today to explain why the U.S. believes North Korea launched the cyberattack against Sony. James Comey spoke at a conference on cybersecurity in New York. When the FBI first accused North Korea last month, many technology experts were skeptical. NPR's Dina Temple-Reston reports on the FBI's latest effort to prove its case. DINA TEMPLE-RASTON, BYLINE: The FBI...

Shannon Maureen Conley was just 19, barely out of high school and a convert to Islam, when she fell in love with a Tunisian man who said he was an Islamic State fighter in Syria. And, according to a criminal complaint, she wanted to leave her Denver suburb and join him. Over the course of five months, the FBI talked to Conley nine times, trying to persuade her not to go to Syria. But it didn't work. According to a local news report, her father tipped off the FBI after he found her one-way...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Let's learn more now about three teenage girls from Denver who tried to fly to Syria. They were recruited by the terrorist group known as ISIS, or the Islamic State. The group lured the girls over social media - a tactic the group is using to draw fighters from around the world. NPR's Dina Temple-Raston went to Denver to find out exactly how three seemingly ordinary girls from the Muslim community...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: What has come to be known as the "Torture Report" by Senate investigators broke more new ground than expected. Lawmakers examined interrogations of terror suspects after 9/11. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: It was already known that interrogators used waterboarding, sleep deprivation and more. Senate investigators have now added to that story. Their report, released by Democrats, contends the tactics failed to...

One of the first targets of U.S. airstrikes in Syria was an al-Qaida unit that American officials call the Khorasan Group . Because few outside the intelligence community had ever heard of it, some critics have said Khorasan was created out of whole cloth to give the U.S. an excuse to bomb Syria. They aren't alone: Rebel fighters on the ground say they have never heard of Khorasan. Others claim it's just another name for what's been known for years as Core al-Qaida, the branch of the...

Editor's note on Nov. 17, 2015: This story was originally published in September 2014. But in the wake of the Paris attacks and the discussions surrounding it, we're republishing it now. In a speech before the U.N. General Assembly laying out a blueprint for the global battle against the group that calls itself the Islamic State, President Obama called on the world to take a stand against religious extremism. "The ideology of ISIL or al-Qaida or Boko Haram will wilt and die if it is...

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While the al-Qaida offshoot known as the Khorasan Group only burst into the public consciousness in the past week, the group has been on the radar of counterterrorism officials for a while, and intelligence officials say they have tracked the individual members of the group for years. Its members are part of al-Qaida's core operation, a roster of individuals who fought together in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and even lived together, in exile, in Iran after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The...

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel recently talked about the militants associated with the Islamic State, the group also known as ISIL or ISIS. He made them sound 10 feet tall. "ISIL is as sophisticated and well-funded as any group we have seen," he said. "They are beyond just a terrorist group. They marry ideology [and] a sophistication of strategic and tactical military prowess; they are tremendously well-funded. This is beyond anything we've seen." Audrey Kurth Cronin, a professor at George...

Mocha Hookah is a little Middle Eastern restaurant and cafe on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn where you can pick up a shawarma gyro sandwich and a falafel platter and still get change back from your $20 bill. Walk inside and there's Arabic music, soccer games on flat screen televisions, and a hookah, or water pipe, set up at every table. If you narrow your eyes, the cafe looks like it has been transplanted from Yemen. On the walls are drawings of camels and caravans; older men shuffle in and...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9CfIXEVqw8 The heyday of "war tourism" was probably the 1930s, when a host of intellectuals and artists left the U.S. to bear witness to the Spanish Civil War. Ernest Hemingway wrote about it. George Orwell, just to name another, actually fought in it. Regular people from all walks of life showed up on those fields of battle as well, in much the same way young men — both Muslim and non-Muslim — are streaming to Syria today. The modern-day result: Instead of...

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Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Today, American foreign policy intersected with personal tragedy. The parents of James Foley spoke about their son. He's the American journalist killed by the extremist group known as the Islamic State. DIANE FOLEY: He always hoped that he would come home, that was his hope. And he sustained all the others who were with him, really with that hope. SIEGEL: Foley's death is also a challenge to the United...

Editor's note on Aug. 17 at 11:25 a.m. ET: A clarification and links to the ombudsman's critique of this post have been added. For nearly a year, U.S. government officials have said revelations from former NSA contract worker Edward Snowden harmed national security and allowed terrorists to develop their own countermeasures. Those officials haven't publicly given specific examples — but a tech firm based in Cambridge, Mass., says it has tangible evidence of the changes. According to a new...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: At the White House today President Obama said the U.S. is confident that the crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was caused by a surface-to-air missile. He also said that the missile was fired from a part of Ukraine controlled by Russian backed separatists. (SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH) PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Nearly 300 innocent lives were taken. Men, women, children, infants who had nothing to do with the...

In the fight against terrorist organizations, one weapon has been effective in the past: cutting off their funding. Terrorist groups tend to get their money from outside donors or charities. But the Islamic State, the group that now controls huge areas of Syria and Iraq, doesn't get its money that way. So the methods the U.S. Treasury has used to fight terrorist groups in the past won't work as well. Right after the Sept. 11 attacks, the Bush administration created an intelligence unit within...

Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: And I'm Melissa Block. The head of a terrorist group controlling large parts of Syria and Iraq has declared himself the leader of a new caliphate, or Muslim state. But does saying it make it so? Counterterrorism officials say they haven't seen much happening on the ground that suggests major political changes. They say the decision to establish a caliphate is more about...

This week a young man in Texas became the first American to plead guilty to terrorism charges related to the recent fighting in Iraq. Michael Wolfe, 23, was arrested just before he boarded a plane. He was on his way to join ISIS, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, the Sunni extremist group that has been storming its way across Iraq for the past two weeks. ISIS and hundreds of other rebel groups in Syria have inspired thousands of young men around the world to leave their homes and join the...

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