Dani Hayes

Assistant News Director & Online Managing Editor

Dani, hailing from Highland, Utah, graduated from Utah State University with a BS in journalism and a minor in art history. The plan was to become an art critic at some exotic area in Europe but then she discovered public radio during an internship at UPR. After graduation she worked for the LDS Church's radio station called the Mormon Channel. After 2 1/2 years there, she was drawn back to Logan to be a full-time employee at Utah Public Radio. She handles the UPR website and all its social media platforms, as well as sharing the newsroom load with Kerry Bringhurst. She also produces various UPR original series.

When she's not at work, you can find her adventuring or planning a new adventure on Pinterest. She loves to dance - specifically Scottish dance. She's currently training to become a certified Scottish dance teacher through the official dance board in Scotland. And she believes that everything in life can be related back to a Seinfeld episode.  

Ways to Connect

spotlightonpoverty.org

 

Officials south of Salt Lake City say efforts to tackle the contentious political issues of drugs and overcrowding at the capital's homeless shelter appear to be pushing more people in need to Provo. 

Dani Hayes

Do you remember the documentary Supersize Me? The one where the film’s director and star Morgan Spurlock ate nothing but McDonalds for a month? Well, now Spurlock is back, curating an art exhibit at the Kimball Art Center dedicated to the Sundance Film Festival. Supersize Me premiered at the festival along with many other projects Spurlock has done. His project this year is called Thirty-Three: Celebrating 33 Years of the Independent Spirit & Sundance Film Festival.

Erin Cox is a junior at Utah State University studying broadcast journalism. Over the 2016 Christmas break, she received an email from the Utah GOP saying there were tickets available to the presidential inauguration.

Mary Kay Andersen

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by self-starvation and excessive weight loss. According to the National Eating Disorder Association, anorexia has one of the highest death rates of any mental health condition and 1% of American females suffer from this life-threatening disorder.

Carol Berrey

 

The show is called “Fat Phobia” and is part of a larger multi-faceted program called “The Body Image Project.” Those at Art Access, which is a community-focused organization that uses art to drive ideas, wanted to tackle the concept of personal and social body image perspectives by deepening the conversation of weight. Within The Body Image Project was the Fat Phobia exhibit.

Ally Wall

Ally Wall spent most of her life in hiding. She was a member of the polygamist sect Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints lead by Warren Jeffs, who they consider to be a prophet of God. He’s currently serving a life sentence in a Texas prison for the sexual assault of underage girls. Ally tells her story about her life in the FLDS community, how she educated herself on the actuality of the sect she was born in, and how she ultimately made the decision to leave.

 

U.S. Rep. Rob Bishop and his Democratic opponent clashed on medical marijuana, climate change, and the Republican's continued support for Donald Trump at a debate.

Doctor Peter Clemens challenged the seven-term incumbent during a spirited event in Ogden on Monday.

Utah Debate Commission

On October 4, Charlene Albarran and Rep. Chris Stewart debated during the 2nd Congressional District Debate on the campus of the University of Utah.  

Jason Gilmore


Indigenous to Salvador, Brazil is the fighting form known as Capoeira. From the outside, it might appear as an acrobatic dance, or some sort of karate incorporating music and roundhouse kicks. The presentation is more theater than fighting to the outside observer. It is deceptively clever and excels at trickery. No mats are used here, this dance takes place on the streets.

Jason Gilmore

The identity of the modern Brazilian woman is ever changing. This complex story of female empowerment is a transnational one, but one that is especially visible in Brazil and Latin America.


The minute you set foot in the streets of downtown Salvador, Brazil, you are met with the sound of these drums. These are the drums of Olodum. Sounds that have become iconic of the Afro-Brazilian identity and culture of this colorful colonial city.

Jason Gilmore

The children of Salvador da Bahia, Brazil, sound just like any others. Happy, laughing, playing. But many of them face a difficult reality. Drugs and violence are daily concerns for many of these young children.

Jason Gilmore

"Roots of Brazil" is a 5-part radio series exploring Brazil's cultural origins by illuminating Salvador da Bahia, a city at the center of the country's rich history. Producer Dani Hayes sat down with those who were able to travel to Salvador and interview those who are influencing modern-day Brazil.

Dani Hayes

Traffic on Logan’s Main Street was diverted for several hours Friday morning. Local fire crews and emergency vehicles blocked traffic while battling a blaze on the south end of Main Street.

The fire department was called at 6:19 a.m. Friday. Craig Humphreys, fire marshal for the Logan City Fire Department, said when crews arrived at the location, smoke and flames were showing from the structure.