Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to leading the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell trains both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between departments. Other shows he has worked with include All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, as well as editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division. He also worked at the network's video and research library.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as editor-in-chief of The Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Since her birth in 1900, Anna Stoehr has seen dramatic shifts in technology. But when the Minnesota woman tried recently to create a Facebook account, she hit a snag. The service's software couldn't handle her advanced age of 113 years old. So she fudged it a bit, and said she was 99.

To put Stoehr's age in context, we'll remind you: She was born three years before the Wright brothers conducted their historic first flight of an airplane in North Carolina.

For the second consecutive year, a wide survey found people in Latin America are the least likely to say they live in countries where women are treated with respect and dignity, ranking below the Middle East and North Africa.

The Gallup survey found a wide range of opinions within Latin America: while 63 percent of respondents in Ecuador said women get respect, only 20 percent said the same in Peru and Colombia.

After 40 days of seclusion, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has made a public appearance, an outing that could help quell rumors about his health and status. Kim visited a new housing complex, according to state media that released photos of the event — but without attaching a specific date to it.

North Korea has confirmed only that Kim has been in "discomfort." The newly released photos show Kim using a cane, possibly confirming theories that he underwent ankle surgery. More than a month ago, he was seen limping as he walked.

Mr. Curly. That's the name Daniela Liverani gave to the 3-inch leech that doctors found living in her nostril last week. With that tone of creepiness established, we can now provide more details to a story that might have you giving the old schnozz a closer look the next time you see a mirror.

It took a medical team about 30 minutes to remove the leech; Liverani believes it had been living in there for about a month.

Same-sex couples in Alaska and North Carolina are receiving marriage licenses, after courts in those states recently overturned bans on gay marriage. The two states are part of the cascading effects of the Supreme Court's refusal to review any appeals in same-sex marriage cases in its current term.

Newly instituted screening procedures at New York's JFK International Airport identified 91 arriving passengers as having a higher risk of being infected with Ebola based on their recent travel, CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden said Monday. None of the airline passengers had a fever, Frieden said, noting that of five people who were sent for further evaluation, none were determined to have Ebola.

The remains of thousands of U.S. soldiers who died in the Korean War are "left here and there uncared and carried away en masse," a North Korean military spokesman said Monday.

He said the remains are being put at risk by large construction projects – and by the halting of joint recovery efforts. North Korea is estimated to contain the remains of more than 5,000 American soldiers.

From Seoul, Jason Strother reports:

At a sentencing hearing for Oscar Pistorius, a court-appointed prison social worker says the South African athlete's punishment for culpable homicide should include three years of house arrest.

Pistorius shot and killed his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, in his home last year. The former Olympian was found not guilty of murder last month.

From Pretoria, reporter Nastasya Tay filed this story for our Newscast unit:

The besieged city of Kobani, Syria, has seen an increase in air strikes and fighting, with Kurdish fighters in the area saying they've stopped the extremist group ISIS from advancing. As the U.S.-led coalition carried out strikes on areas east and south of Kobani, new reports emerged about Turkey's role in supporting the fight against ISIS.

Saying that he "clarified how to understand and regulate industries with a few powerful firms," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the Nobel Prize in economic sciences to Jean Tirole, who teaches at the Toulouse School of Economics. He studies oligopolies, markets that are controlled by a handful of powerful (and interdependent) companies.

"I was very surprised, I was incredibly surprised," Tirole said shortly after he received the phone call informing him of the win. "The honor... it took me half an hour to recoup from the call. I still haven't recouped yet."

Archaeologists have uncovered an intricate and beautiful floor mosaic in a large tomb in northern Greece. Dating from the last quarter of the 4th century B.C., the mosaic covers a space of nearly 15 feet by 10 feet. It features two horses, a man and the god Hermes; it was found in a tomb that was discovered in August.

Hundreds of thousands of people are seeking safety on India's eastern coast, fleeing a powerful storm that made landfall Sunday morning. Cyclone Hudhud is being blamed for several deaths after it struck the port city of Visakhapatnam (often called Vizag), destroying shops and snapping power lines along the coast of the Bay of Bengal.

Responding to a call to gather in St. Louis for a weekend event called Ferguson October, more than 1,000 people are hitting the city's streets to protest the recent killing of young black men by police. While most of the gatherings have been peaceful, some arrests took place last night.

Michael Brown, 18, was shot and killed by a police officer in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson two months ago this weekend.

A one-day conference in Cairo has brought pledges of some $5.4 billion to help rebuild Gaza, the Palestinian territory whose infrastructure was crippled in 50 days of fighting between Hamas and Israel. The figure far surpasses an estimate from Palestinians who said the rebuilding project would cost $4 billion. U.S. officials had expressed doubt the meeting would yield that figure.

Have you seen The Empire Strikes Back Uncut? If you have, there's a chance you're one of the hundreds of fans who contributed their own scenes to recreate the Star Wars classic in full.

The FDA has approved a once-a-day pill that combines two drugs to treat hepatitis C, the deadly virus that attacks the liver and is believed to infect 3.2 million Americans.

The new product brings several advances, but it also has a steep price tag, reported at $1,125 per tablet. NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff reports:

"The treatment, made by Gilead Sciences, bypasses the need for any injections or older drugs that have serious side effects.

Not many political opponents eat breakfast together or sit for a joint interview, but those things are what define the race for Campbell County sheriff in northern Kentucky. That's where Democrat Scott Hildebrand and Republican Mike Jansen are waging "a clean race," as Jansen says, because the voters deserve it.

Officials at five busy U.S. airports are putting in place screening measures meant to prevent the spread of the deadly Ebola virus. Screening began at JFK Airport today; it will start at other international airports next week.

The push comes as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced the outbreak has killed at least 4,024 people in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

For about a month, Kmart says, its stores' checkout registers were "compromised by malicious software that stole customer credit and debit card information."

The company, owned by Sears, says it removed the malware from its system after it was discovered Thursday. It announced the exposure late Friday, saying that no personal data or PIN numbers were lost.

While some important customer information seems to have been protected, the breach could still allow criminals to make counterfeit versions of the exposed credit cards.

Steven Patrick Morrissey, the singer who formerly led The Smiths and is on a solo tour in Europe, has undergone treatment for cancer, he tells a Spanish newspaper. Morrissey did not specify what ailment he had been suffering from, saying only that he had undergone "cancer scrapings."

The singer, 55, was asked about his health in an interview for Spanish newspaper El Mundo.

Same-sex couples are marrying in at least six more states today, after the Supreme Court left in place lower courts' rulings against bans on gay marriage. But couples have been turned away in Kansas, one of several states that share federal jurisdiction with states where bans were lifted.

As times got tough in the recent recession, the less well-off of America's citizens became more generous when giving to charity. But at the same time, wealthy Americans cut the proportion of their incomes they donated, according to a new study that analyzed data from tax returns.

NPR's Pam Fessler reports for our Newscast unit:

The Supreme Court's new term will not include any cases that might decide the issue of same-sex marriage in the U.S., a development that comes after many lower and appeals courts have ruled against states' bans on gay marriage. Advocates on both sides of the issue have been calling for the high court to review the issue and make an official ruling.

The court's refusal of all the petitions related to bans on gay marriage means that the appeals courts' decisions allowing gay marriage can now take effect. They had been on hold pending a potential review by the Supreme Court.

Computer giant Hewlett-Packard, a stalwart through decades of shifts in America's technology landscape, is dividing itself into two companies in its most drastic attempt yet to adjust to new markets.

The ailing company that was founded 75 years ago in a Palo Alto garage was synonymous with Silicon Valley.

October brings the peak of the autumn foliage season in many U.S. states, drawing both tourists and camera lenses. Thanks to the NPR community, we've collected a few photos that are worth taking a break from the news to stare at.

The photos were taken in a variety of states — except, of course, those where the season hasn't begun to turn. If you're heading out to see the autumn views, the USDA has a map showing where the leaves are turning; in many states, local agencies can provide more tailored information.

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