Associated Press

Police investigation site
Matt Jensen

The family of a Utah college student who died after riding his bike into a slack line tied between two trees has agreed to dismiss three students from a wrongful death lawsuit.

The rope was set up by the students on Utah State University's campus to practice their balance. 

Media reports that Rafael Seminario, an attorney for one of the students, said three students reached a confidential settlement with the family of 24-year-old Eric Anderson to avoid an emotion trial.

The Anderson family attorney declined to comment Monday.

Canyon Road
www.efl.fhwa.dot.gov

Two teenagers survived after their vehicle plunged 100-150 feet down a steep ravine in Salt Lake County this weekend.

Unified Police Lt. Justin Hoyal said the 16-year-old boy driving the car took a curve too fast, and the vehicle plunged off the road around 10 p.m. on Sunday.

“They came around a corner just too quick, lost control, veered across the oncoming traffic lane, and then off the edge and down the embankment,” said Hoyal. “In the process of going down off the edge, they rolled several times then ultimately came to rest at the bottom of the ravine.”

Wolverine Sighting
Utah Division of Wildlife Resources

Utah wildlife officials have captured images of an animal thought nonexistent in the state, a wolverine.

The images come from trail cameras on the northern face of the Uinta Mountains, which the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources had set up to observe elusive animals in their natural habitat.

Though the bait in the area where the wolverine was sighted had already been devoured, the creature was drawn to the region by the scent.

The corporate owners of The Salt Lake Tribune and CEO of the Deseret News say in new court filings that changes to terms of a joint operating agreement aren't intended to put the Tribune out of business.

Digital First Media is a New York hedge fund that owns the Tribune. The CEO John Paton says there are no plans to stop publishing the Tribune and that the agreement is designed to save the paper. Deseret News CEO Clark Gilbert says the new terms preserve both papers.

Wayne Dodge
Weber County Sheriff

A man who engaged in a physical dispute over saved pew space at an Ogden LDS church will be spending some time in jail.

Wayne Dodge was scheduled to report to Weber County Jail, Monday where he will spend 30 days. Media reports Dodge was sentenced Wednesday after pleading guilty to the class B misdemeanor of assault. The 52-year-old was accused of punching another man and hitting him with his car.

Face of a mountain lion.
fwp.mt.gov

SANDY, Utah (AP) — Utah authorities have captured a mountain lion that startled shoppers but didn’t hurt anyone Friday morning at a shopping center in a suburb of Salt Lake.

Sandy Police Sgt. Dean Carriger says the mountain lion was spotted walking across a street into Jordan Commons in Sandy, Utah, just before 8 a.m.

Officers found the cat hunkered down at the entrance of a steakhouse. Some people were taking pictures and videos, while others were unaware the cat was even there.

The Taliban has suspended talks over a possible exchange of Taliban and U.S. prisoners due to the "complexity" of the situation in Afghanistan, the militant group said on Sunday.

"Due to the political complexity of the current situation in the country, the leadership of the Islamic Emirate has decided to suspend the issue for some time," Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in an email to media organizations, using the name the Taliban gave their 1996-2001 government.

A 55-year-old restaurant manager died and more than two dozen others were taken to hospitals Saturday after being overcome by carbon monoxide at a New York mall, police said.

Suffolk County police identified the man who died as Steven Nelson, a manager at the Legal Sea Foods restaurant at the Walt Whitman Shops in Huntington Station on Long Island.

Police said 28 others affected by carbon monoxide were taken to area hospitals.

The stakes were high and the vote was close as Boeing production workers agreed to concede some benefits in order to secure assembly of the new 777X airplane for the Puget Sound region.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and Boeing hailed Friday's vote, which proponents said solidifies the aerospace giant's presence in the Seattle area.

"Tonight, Washington state secured its future as the aerospace capital of the world," Inslee declared.

Paul Walker, the star of the "Fast & Furious" movie series, died Saturday in a car crash that killed one other person north of Los Angeles, his publicist said. He was 40.

Walker died Saturday afternoon, Ame Van Iden told the Associated Press.

A statement on the actor's Facebook page said he was a passenger in a friend's car, and that Walker was in the area to attend a charity event for his organization Reach Out Worldwide.

"We ... are stunned and saddened beyond belief by this news," the statement said.

Americans Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller won the Nobel prize for economics on Monday for developing new methods to study trends in asset markets.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said the three had laid the foundation of the current understanding of asset prices.

While it's hard to predict whether stock or bond prices will go up or down in the short term, it's possible to foresee movements over periods of three years or longer, the academy said.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Federal wildlife officials will hold public meetings in Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming on their proposal to buy conservation easements along the Bear River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reportedly wants to buy up to 920,000 acres from willing sellers for an estimated $745,000,000.

From its headwaters in Utah's Uinta Mountains, the river flows north through Wyoming and Idaho before ending its 500-mile journey at the Great Salt Lake.

Major League Baseball expanded its playoff format to 10 teams Friday, adding a second wild-card in each league.

The decision establishes a new one-game, wild-card round in each league between the teams with the best records who are not division winners, meaning a third-place team could win the World Series.

This is the only change in baseball's playoff structure since the 1995 season, when wild-card teams were first added.