Ali Snow

Arts Reporter

After a year-long performing stint in Milan, Italy, Ali  graduated with a Bachelor's of Music in Piano Performance at Utah State University in May 2014.

Forever a closet poet and journal writer, she decided to take the plunge and explore different mediums, with public radio finding a special place in her heart. To her, there has been nothing more satisfying than combining her two loves: music and writing. She is currently working as a freelance Arts and Culture reporter with UPR, as well as continuing performing and teaching as a collaborative and chamber pianist.

This December she will be applying to graduate school to pursue a masters degree in journalism, in attempts to satisfy her insatiable appetite for learning.

Pianist David Korevaar will be performing a recital this Saturday at the Fibonacci Fine Arts Center in St. George. As a professor of piano at the University of Colorado, Boudler, he considers teaching to carry the same amount of weight as his creative work.

The centerpiece of pianist David Korevaar’s program will be Schubert’s sonata in A major. A grand and symphonic work, the piece was written in the final year of the composer’s life. To complement the piece, Korevaar will also be performing Mozart’s sonata K. 333 in B flat.


The exhibit “We are Such Stuff as Dreams are Made On” features production photographs spanning 50 plus years at the Utah Shakespeare Festival. This Tony award-winning company has featured big names and big shows with Shakespeare as its cornerstone.

Jason Spelbring is a theatre professor at Utah State University and has worked as an actor at the festival for six seasons.

“People in this exhibit can see the progression of work, quality, names, people that people probably know from T.V, film, and the state of Utah. It’s just sort of a great way to remember and realize that there is world-class theatre right here in the state of Utah,” said Spelbring.


A woman with a cowboy hat, tan jacket, and bright red scarf leans against a hay bale.
texascowboypoetry.com

The Cache Valley Cowboy Rendezvous is presenting an evening at the barn on Tuesday at the American West Heritage Center. Doris Daley, one of the featured performers, is a Canadian cowgirl and poet. She says the energy and audience engagement at events such as these is invigorating.

“One of my goals is to bring my audience along on the ride with me. If there are 100 people in the audience, I hope that there are 100 different movies playing in their heads. I want to bring people along in my story, but I also hope that they are experiencing their own stories,” Daley said.


A beautiful white lidded, ceramic pot with a ceramic blue bird perched on top.
Utah Museum of Natural History

The Natural History Museum of Utah will host Native American artists from across the state this weekend. We spoke with organizers of the event to learn more about what makes these Native American creations so unique.

Twenty Native American artists of tribes from Apache to Zuni will participate at this year’s second annual Indian Art Market.  A wide range of mediums will be on display including jewelry, sculpture, beadwork, fetish carving, and pottery.


A painting displaying beautiful autumn colors in Logan.
Vlad Krylov

Cache Valley boasts many gems, from its beauties in nature to its hidden outdoor adventure destinations.  Also lesser-known is the fact that the Valley is home to a thriving community of talented artists. Representatives from the Cache Valley Center for the Arts spoke about the grand opening for their new gallery in downtown Logan. One of their goals: to feature and uncover these great artists.

The new art gallery in downtown Logan, located in the Bullen Center, will be opening after months of dedicated passion and work. Adam Shelton, the Marketing Director for the Cache Valley Center for the Arts, says the opening exhibition displays a fascinating variety of works.

“I’ve been walking through as they’ve been setting up and it’s really interesting to see the works of photography standing right next to jewelry, standing right next to ceramics, and all of those arts working together,” said Shelton. “I think it’s like having an all-year-round Summerfest, right indoors.”

Is it possible to see music? Or hear a painting? The art exhibition “Enchanted Modernities: Mysticism, Landscape and the American West” answers these questions and more by exploring the impact of Theosophy, a society founded in New York in the late 19th century, on visual artists, writers, and composers in the American West. Join us at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art as the three exhibition curators give us personalized tour.

Alexander Scriabin, a Russian pianist and composer who was deeply influenced by Theosophy, visualized a grand magnum opus which he titled “Mysterium.” This week-long, multimedia performance would take place in the Himalayas incorporating music, scent, dance, and light. This great and final concert would ultimately bring about the end the world. Luckily for the fate of the rest of us, this work remained unfinished.

A traveling Ugandan children’s choir will perform in Logan Friday evening.

This concert will be filled with bright costumes, smiles, and songs delivering messages of hope and joy. As these children travel and perform far from home, they are not only helping kids back in Uganda, but are brightening the lives of those who they meet along the way.

This is the second year Robert and Barbara Guy have hosted the kids.

On Thursday, Utah will host their own version of the Grammys. The “Utah Music Awards” or “UMA’s” will be a glamorous evening of awards and performances, giving Utahns their chance to get the “Hollywood Treatment” in the Beehive State.

If you were asked what the bands Neon Trees, Imagine Dragons, The Used, Royal Bliss, Panic and the Disco and The Killers all have in common, what would you say? It’s a little known fact that all of these bands actually got their start in Utah.


When the Salt Lake Arts Council called for submissions for their temporary public art project in January, Cache Valley artist Michael Bingham heeded their call. His proposal was one of 12 selected to make their street sculpture visions a reality. 

Standing in the midst of this metal shop, there’s an overwhelming sense of power and of energy, and even danger. Perhaps it is from the massive machinery that fills the room, each with their own capabilities to cut, mold, and bend steel with ease.

This is the studio in which Cache Valley artist Michael Bingham works every day. We chatted together next to a giant, nine-foot-tall skeleton of an astronaut made out of steel rods and rebar. When thinking about what he could make that would align with the public art project’s theme, “Flying Objects,” he said an astronaut is immediately what came to mind.

“Probably a combination of things. Childhood dreams of wanting to be an astronaut [laughs]. Maybe like every other little boy," Bingham said. 


Have you ever considered what an amazing act of faith it is, for a conductor, to signal an upbeat and come down and expect sound to happen? We now introduce a fearless Karen Keltner, resident conductor of the San Diego Opera, who has helped to make the Utah Festival Opera and Musical Theatre a success now for eighteen seasons.

A native Hoosier from South Bend, Indiana, Karen Keltner says that she was bitten by the collaborative music-making bug early on in life. She began to take piano lessons at age six and the deal was, she had to practice an hour a day.

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