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NPR Story
2:00 am
Fri January 13, 2012

The Last Word In Business

On Twitter, News Corps. Chief Rupert Murdoch confessed: "We screwed up in every way possible." He added the company learned a lot of valuable and expensive lessons from the purchase of the social networking site.

NYS Emmy-nominated journalist Julie Philipp has been News Director for WXXI’s Center for Public Affairs since 2008, overseeing radio, television, and online news.

Prior to that, she served as WXXI Television News Director.  She first came to WXXI in 1989 as a radio journalist, earning top honors in the New York State Broadcasters Association’s General Excellence in Individual Reporting and Enterprise Reporting award categories.  She also served as interim Capitol Bureau Correspondent for New York State Public Radio, reporting statewide from Albany. While taking some time to raise her family on a small farm near Rochester, Julie was a freelance writer for news and general interest publications.

All Tech Considered
10:38 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

CES: Tech Launching Pad, Home To 8M Types Of iPod Cases

H2O has figured out a way to waterproof gadgets. The company was a media sensation at this year's CES.
H20

More than 3,100 companies flocked to the Consumer Electronics Show this year to hawk their wares. The show's host, the consumer Electronic Association, estimates roughly 20,000 products were launched at the show this year. And chances are good that many – maybe even most — will fail.

The show will close its doors Friday and there are lots of little companies and entrepreneurs packing up that may not make it back next year. Still, their hustle is infectious. And with luck, a few startups launched here this year could go on to become huge.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:28 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Will The Show Go On At New York City Opera?

The embattled general manager and artistic director of New York City Opera, George Steel.
Jason Kempin Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 9:50 am

For almost 70 years, New York City has been home to two opera companies: the well-heeled Metropolitan Opera and its scrappy younger sibling, the New York City Opera. But City Opera has fallen on hard times, and a bitter labor dispute might mean curtains for this beloved institution.

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Economy
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

In GOP Campaign, Private Equity Firms Draw Flak

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 10:20 am

Was Mitt Romney a job-creating turnaround artist? Or was he, as some on the campaign trail have said, a "vulture capitalist"? That question has become a top issue in the Republican presidential primaries.

In the 1980s, Romney ran a private equity firm called Bain Capital. It's an industry where it's hard to avoid getting your hands dirty.

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StoryCorps
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Threats And Lies, And 'Who I'm Supposed To Be'

Nathan Hoskins told Sally Evans the story of how his mother tried to scare him out of being gay, during a visit to StoryCorps in Lexington, Ky.
StoryCorps

Nathan Hoskins knew from an early age that he was gay. But when he was growing up in rural Kentucky, his mother took extreme steps to convince him otherwise.

"When I was in sixth grade, I had met a good friend and he wasn't interested in girls," Hoskins, who's now 33, tells his friend Sally Evans. "One day, he said, 'I have a Valentine's Day card for you.'"

"I asked him for it, and he said it was so special that he mailed it," he says. "And he didn't know he'd done a very terrible thing because at my house only one person got the mail — and that was my mother."

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Afghanistan
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

In Afghanistan, Some Former Taliban Become Police

The northern Afghan town of Char Bolak is guarded by the Critical Infrastructure Police, an auxiliary police program. The U.S. is increasingly relying on ad hoc local militias to fight the Taliban, but residents and government officials have concerns about the militias.
Quil Lawrence NPR

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 9:50 am

NATO officials say they have reversed a disturbing trend in northern Afghanistan.

In 2009 and 2010, Taliban insurgents made inroads across the north of the country, which had been secure for years. NATO says that last year it brought the north back under control, but Afghan officials say it's thanks to one of the most controversial American tactics here: the use of ad hoc local militias.

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Planet Money
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

The Transformation Of American Factory Jobs, In One Company

Maddie Parlier at work.
Dean Kaufman The Atlantic

Originally published on Sat January 14, 2012 12:46 pm

This is the second in a two-part series. Part one is here. For more, see Adam Davidson's cover story in this month's issue of The Atlantic.

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Business
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Kodak Retirees Worry Amid Bankruptcy Talk

Amid recent reports that Kodak could be headed into bankruptcy, financial advisers in Rochester, N.Y., where the company is based, are seeing more and more Kodak retirees who are anxious about their personal financial futures.

Once upon a time, Kodak provided secure, good-paying jobs to tens of thousands of local residents. For about the past 25 years, the company has been shedding local employees — from a high of more than 60,000 in 1982 to about 6,000 today.

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World
10:01 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

In Russia's Far East, A Frayed Link To Moscow

Compared to many of the dynamic economies in Asia, development is Russia's Far East is limited. Here, men wait for a ferry to take them to Russky Island just off Vladivostok, on Russia's Pacific Coast. In the background, a bridge to the island is being built.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 9:50 am

After a train journey of nearly 6,000 miles from Moscow, the Russian Pacific port of Vladivostok can feel like a different country. The people and the language are still Russian, but the strong Asian influence is undeniable. And many residents say the bond to the rest of Russia has been growing weaker, while the ties to Asia have been growing stronger since the Soviet breakup two decades ago. NPR's David Greene has this report as he wraps up his journey on the Trans-Siberian railway.

The last of three stories

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