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Utah News
3:18 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

Wrongful Death Suit Going to Trial in Hurricane City

A federal judge in Salt Lake City has ruled that wrongful death lawsuit against Hurricane City, and two members of its police department may proceed to trial.

In 2009, Brian Cardall and family were traveling through Washington County returning to their home in Flagstaff, when Cardall experienced a manic episode related to bipolar disorder. He left his vehicle and began removing his clothing. His wife Anna dialed 911. Within minutes Chief Lynn Excell and Officer Kenneth Thompson of the Hurricane Police Department arrived.

NPR Story
3:08 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

A Look At Romney's Olympic Legacy

At the opening ceremony of the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Mitt Romney (left) stands with President George W. Bush (center) and International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge (right) in front of the American flag that flew at the World Trade Center before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
George Frey AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:07 am

Ten years after the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics, there's still some debate about Mitt Romney's claim that he helped "save" the games — and about whether he used the Olympics to relaunch a fledgling political career.

In 1999, Romney accepted the job as CEO of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee (SLOC), five years after he failed to oust Sen. Ted Kennedy from his Massachusetts Senate seat.

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Election 2012
2:58 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

The Ron Paul Paradox: GOP Questions His Impact

Ron Paul greets supporters in Meredith, N.H., on Sunday, two days before he placed second in the state's Republican primary.
Stephan Savoia Associated Press

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 8:08 pm

Four years ago, Texas Rep. Ron Paul finished fifth in the New Hampshire presidential primary with just under 8 percent of the vote.

On Tuesday, he got nearly 23 percent of the vote in the New Hampshire primary, finishing second to former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney in the Republican contest. That came a week after Paul's third-place finish in the Iowa caucuses.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:48 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

India Marks A Year Free Of Polio

An Indian boy receives a polio vaccination from an Indian health worker in Amritsar last year.
Narinder Nanu AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 3:08 pm

A year ago today, India saw its last recorded case of polio in an 18-month-old girl in West Bengal named Rukhsar Khatoon. She recovered without lasting paralysis.

One year without another case is an impressive milestone in the decades-long effort to wipe the poliovirus from the face of the planet. Only a few years ago, India reported more polio cases than anywhere else — as many as 100,000 cases a year.

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The Salt
2:37 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

Waste Whey? Some Say No Way.

Swiss cheese-maker Ernst Waser lets the whey drain off from the skimmed cheese curd through the cheesecloth.
GAETAN BALLY KEYSTONE /Landov

When you open a tub of yogurt, do you pour off that cloudy layer of liquid that collects on the top? If so, you're not just wasting nutritious protein and lactose – you're tossing out what some scientists see as a valuable raw material.

Strange though it might seem, researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering in Germany announced this week that they're turning whey into plastic-like films.

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Marin Alsop on Music
2:34 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

Alsop Sprach Zarathustra: Decoding Strauss' Tone Poem

Richard Strauss' iconic opening to Also Sprach Zarathustra evokes a sense of vastness and power, Marin Alsop says.
Valery Hache AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 14, 2012 12:12 pm

I can't imagine a more stimulating conversation opener than "God is dead." Indeed, this quote by Friedrich Nietzsche sparked heated debate in his time, as it still does today. But how many of us know the writings of this 19th-century philosopher?

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Elizabeth Blair is a Senior Producer on the Arts Desk of NPR News.

On a daily basis, she produces, edits and reports arts and cultural segments that air on NPR News magazines including Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Her recent stories explored the rise of public humiliation in popular culture, consumers' changing media habits and the intersection of the arts and education.

It's All Politics
2:30 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

A GOP 'Station Of The Cross,' Bob Jones Is Not On Romney's Itinerary

Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney greets supporters during a campaign stop at Cherokee Trikes and More in Greer, S.C. on Thursday.
BRIAN SNYDER Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 2:48 pm

Bob Jones University used to be a "station of the cross for aspiring presidential candidates," NPR's Ari Shapiro reports on Friday's All Things Considered. Candidates like Ronald Reagan, Bob Dole and Pat Buchanan all spoke at the school, a "bastion of the most conservative brand of evangelical Christianity," Shapiro says.

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Music News
2:25 pm
Fri January 13, 2012

Red Heart The Ticker: Raising The Dead Via Folk Music

Tyler Gibbons and Robin MacArthur of Red Heart the Ticker.
Ed Cyzewski

Family heirlooms take all shapes: a pocket watch, a painting. For Robin MacArthur and her husband Tyler Gibbons, who form the folk duo Red Heart the Ticker, the family inheritance consists of an old house and lots of songs — both gifts from MacArthur's late grandmother, Margaret.

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