Business
2:00 am
Wed January 11, 2012

Business News

A growth of 3 percent is not bad, given all the European turmoil. But there's a downside in the report. It shows the German economy shrinking a bit at the end of 2011.

Beijing Correspondent Louisa Lim is currently attending the University of Michigan as a Knight-Wallace Fellow. She will return to her regular role in 2014.

Based in Beijing, NPR foreign correspondent Louisa Lim finds China a hugely diverse, vibrant, fascinating place. "Everywhere you look and everyone you talk to has a fascinating story," she notes, adding that she's "spoiled with choices" of stories to cover. In her reports, Lim takes "NPR listeners to places they never knew existed. I want to give them an idea of how China is changing and what that might mean for them."

Sweetness And Light
12:59 am
Wed January 11, 2012

If You Pay For Cable, You're A Hostage Of Sports

Even if you don't watch ESPN's Monday Night Football, you help to pay for it if you're a cable subscriber. ESPN's monthly fees are the highest in the business.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

For the many reasons that the Republican presidential debates have been so popular, the main one is simply that they're live. Happening right before our eyes. When Rick Perry says "Oops," he's saying it just as we're hearing it. Live. Wow: "Oops."

This is why, whether you like sports or not — perhaps you'd desperately prefer NPR to have somebody else right now, talking about something really important, not sports — nonetheless, each month, you're charged about eight bucks on your cable bill for the privilege of not watching sports.

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World
10:01 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Russia, A Nation Shaped By Tragedy And Hardship

Ella Stroganova opens the door at the city museum in Yaroslavl, Russia, where she serves as curator. "Progress makes person absolutely weak," Stroganova said. "He loses his strength because he doesn't need to think how to survive."
David Gilkey NPR

Seven time zones and thousands of miles separate Russia's capital, Moscow, from the port city of Vladivostok on the Pacific Ocean. NPR journalists traveled the full length of the Trans-Siberian railroad and report on how Russia's history has shaped its people, and where, 20 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russians want their country to go.

First of three parts

Two decades after the collapse of communist rule, just where is Russia headed? Scholars, diplomats and poets are spending careers contemplating the question.

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National Security
10:01 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Guantanamo At 10: U.S. Weighs Future Of Detainees

The 20 detainees who stumbled down the gangway had been put on a nonstop flight from Kandahar, Afghanistan, to Cuba. The men came from all over the Middle East and Africa: Yemen, Sudan, Tunisia, Afghanistan. They all wore the same blackened goggles, earmuffs and orange socks as U.S. soldiers guided them from the plane by their elbows.

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Asia
10:01 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

China Targets Entertainment TV In Cultural Purge

TV show Super Girl Voice, a singing contest show, is recorded at Hunan Satellite TV station in 2006 in Changsha city, Hunan province of China. The show was recently banned as part of a recent entertainment industry crackdown.
Guang Niu Getty Images

Tens of millions of people tune in every week to the Chinese dating show Take Me Out. It's pure entertainment: girls in skimpy dresses hoping for a date; sweaty, geeky guys stammering questions; and two effete hosts sporting matching bouffant hairstyles.

But as of last week, the show was bumped from prime time — part of China's latest clampdown against "excessive entertainment," which is itself a manifestation of a larger ideological campaign.

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Your Money
10:01 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Credit Card Arbitration Trumps Lawsuits, Court Says

Consumers who sign credit card agreements that feature an arbitration clause cannot dispute fees or charges in court, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday. The 8-to-1 decision drew immediate fire from consumer advocates.

To get a credit card, a consumer generally must sign a detailed agreement. In the fine print, almost always, is an arbitration clause that says that if consumers want to dispute fees, they must do so through arbitration, not in court.

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Business
10:01 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

New For 2012: 'This Isn't Your Father's Dodge Dart'

The 2012 Dodge Dart is unveiled at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit on Monday.
Tony Ding AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:08 am

Between 1960 and 1976, the Dodge Dart was one of the best-selling cars in America, with its affordable price and rugged styling. More than 3.5 million Darts were sold.

Though the car was never known for being especially stylish or pretty, Chrysler is now reviving the name as the company continues its own revitalization. On Monday, it unveiled the new Dart at the 2012 North American Auto Show in Detroit.

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Utah News
7:00 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

St. George Excavation Company Gets Federal Pat on the Back

Prime Excavating of St. George replaced a critical water line in a forbidding area of the Arizona strip. The 60-year-old pipeline serves forest service and BLM grazing sites, as well as wildlife in the Houserock Valley area.

Forest managers praised the contractor for its work on very steep terrain and thanked local ranchers who secured the funding for the project.

Presidential Race
6:18 pm
Tue January 10, 2012

Liasson, Dionne, Continetti Discuss N.H. Primary

Melissa Block talks about the New Hampshire primary to NPR's Mara Liasson. She also talks to our political commentators E.J. Dionne, of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and Matthew Continetti, opinion editor of The Weekly Standard, about the results of the New Hampshire primary.

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