Opinion
6:58 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Hot To Trot: Dating With A Few More Wrinkles

Adult children are often surprised when their their over-60 parents hit the dating scene.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 7:00 am

Brian Unger is the host of the History Channel show How The States Got Their Shapes.

When we talk about our moms, many of us end up crying. Barbra Walters made her career exploiting this universal weakness. Newt Gingrich proved it recently, very publicly, in Iowa talking about his mom.

I'm going to try to control my emotions as I discuss my mom.

Because I'm not ashamed to say — lately, there have been a few tears.

My mom's not sick. No, she beat cancer.

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The Two-Way
6:13 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Top Stories: Ship Search Suspended; Famine Fears Grow In Sudan

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 6:14 am

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The Two-Way
5:55 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Seattle, Western Washington Hunker Down As Snow Arrives

Bags of a deicing product were being stacked outside a hardware store in Seattle on Tuesday, as folks prepared for today's bad weather.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 10:01 am

While Seattle may not get hit quite as hard as previously thought by a winter storm that's moving across the Northwest, the National Weather Service has issued some ominous sounding updates about how large that storm is turning out to be.

There's this message:

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Around the Nation
5:38 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Handcuffed Man Accused Of Stealing Police Car

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:28 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Southern California City Fights Crime With Tweets

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 5:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A city here in Southern California is fighting crime with tweets - not social networking, real tweets by birds playing on speakers along the city's main drag. The Wall Street Journal posted online the soundscape - chirping robins, splashing water and faint musical notes. The mayor of Lancaster tells the Journal the birds put residents in, quote, "a better place." And though police say the causes are many, crime in the city is down. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
5:25 am
Wed January 18, 2012

If You Really Need Wikipedia Today, You Can Get To It

Wikipedia's blackout.
Wikipedia.org

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 6:57 am

Just to be clear:

Wikipedia's English pages have indeed "gone black" until midnight ET tonight — part of an organized protest by it and many other websites over pending anti-online piracy legislation in Congress.

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The Two-Way
5:05 am
Wed January 18, 2012

In Italy, Search Of Stricken Cruise Ship Suspended

"Divers searching the capsized Italian cruise liner Costa Concordia suspended work on Wednesday after the vast wreck shifted slightly but officials said they are hoping to resume as soon as possible," Reuters reports.

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Election 2012
5:00 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Hate Politics, Love TV, Live In S.C.? Not Your Week

A political ad airs on a TV at Tommy's Country Ham House in Greenville, S.C., where Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum was preparing to hold a campaign event.
Eric Thayer Reuters /Landov

Scott Sanders will be eating lunch at his desk again. Sanders is the general sales manager for the NBC affiliate in Columbia — South Carolina's capital — so all his time is devoted these days to handling ad traffic ahead of Saturday's Republican primary.

"It's been crazy this week," Sanders says. "It will be hard to watch TV, because there are so many ads."

All five major GOP candidates have ads running during the station's nightly news programs. Their messages are also being amplified and augmented by supportive superPACs.

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Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

After nearly a decade as an award-winning Foreign Correspondent with NPR's international desk, Eric Westervelt returned in September 2013 to domestic news with a new national beat covering American education as an Education Correspondent.

In this role, he covers the news, issues, and trends in classrooms across the country, from pre-K to higher education. He has a strong interest in the multiple ways in which technology is disrupting traditional pedagogy.

Westervelt recently returned from a 2013 John S Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford University. The fellowship focused on journalistic innovation, leadership, entrepreneurship and the future of news.

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